Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
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Breakthroughs Podcast

Listen to the people behind the science

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine is a research-intensive medical school that fosters powerful collaborations on a thriving academic medical campus. We are driven by our mission to transform the practice of medicine and profoundly impact human health beyond the individual patient. We believe better answers only come from discovery.

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Cover image for episode 29

Heart Failure Deaths on the Rise in Younger People with Sadiya Khan, MD, MSc

Death rates due to heart failure are increasing, especially in people under the age of 65 and specifically among Black men. What is fueling this upturn? How can it be stopped? Sadiya Khan, MD, assistant professor of medicine explains.
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Improving Memory Loss in Older Adults with Joel Voss, PhD

As we age, almost all of us have some memory loss. This age-related affliction is normal, but a new Northwestern Medicine study suggests it can be improved with non-invasive brain stimulation that sends electromagnetic pulses into a specific area of the brain. Joel Voss, PhD, an associate professor at Northwestern, led this study, published in the journal Neurology.
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Eyes May Reveal Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease with Amani Fawzi, MD

A new approach from the field of ophthalmology shows promise in detecting non-invasive biomarkers of mild cognitive impairment, the precursor to Alzheimer’s disease. Northwestern's Amani Fawzi, MD, explains.
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New Evidence on Eggs and Heart Health with Norrina Allen, PhD

A large, new Northwestern Medicine study reports adults who ate more eggs and dietary cholesterol had a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease and death from any cause. Norrina Allen, associate professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, explains.
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Serious Eczema Symptoms Beyond the Skin with Jonathan Silverberg, MD, PhD, MPH

The health issues facing people with severe eczema are not only skin deep. Aside from intense itching and dry, irritable skin, people with a type of eczema known as atopic dermatitis also have significantly higher rates of medical and mental health issues. Why does atopic dermatitis come with so many other health issues and what can be done to give patients relief? Northwestern's Dr. Jonathan Silverberg explains.  
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Going Wireless in the NICU with John A. Rogers, PhD and Amy Paller, MD

Northwestern’s John A. Rogers, PhD, and Amy Paller, MD, published a study in the journal Science that shows how ultra thin, electronic sensors developed in Roger’s lab have the potential to make NICUs wireless.
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Children in the Juvenile Justice System Face Serious Health Risks with Linda Teplin, PhD

The landmark Northwestern Juvenile Project, led by Linda Teplin, PhD, has produced some astonishing findings about health risks and premature deaths of delinquent youth. These findings are shaping services and programs that support juvenile detainees, giving them the help they need to live healthier lives.
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Why Are Food Allergies on the Rise? with Ruchi Gupta, MD

There’s been an uptick in childhood food allergies in recent years, and new evidence from Northwestern shows that they’re also becoming more common in adults. Many of the reactions to these allergies are life-threatening. Why is this increase happening and how can we keep people affected by food allergy safe? Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH is trying to answer those questions.
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Finding the Internal Fountain of Youth in Amish Country with Douglas Vaughan, MD

A rare blood disorder related to people missing a protein, called PAI-1, was identified in a small Amish community. Douglas Vaughan, MD, studies the community and found that those without the protein seem to live longer and healthier lives.
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Your Ideal Heart Health with Donald Lloyd-Jones, MD, ScM

Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones was named physician of the year in 2017 by the American Heart Association. Through his research and practice as a preventive cardiologist at Northwestern, Dr. Lloyd Jones is chasing a big goal – to improve and preserve the heart health of Americans, one patient at a time.
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The Genetics of Coffee Drinkers with Marilyn Cornelis, PhD

Is drinking coffee a healthy habit or a vice? Why can some people drink coffee all day with little consequence while others get jittery after a cup? Marilyn Cornelis, PhD, studies the genetics of coffee consumption, caffeine metabolism and taste preferences and has some new findings to share about one of the most popular beverages in the world.
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Precision Medicine for African-Americans with Minoli Perera, PharmD, PhD

The field of pharmacogenomics -- using a patient’s genome to predict how well they will respond to medication -- is a hot area of medicine today. But, almost all data used in these predictions comes from people of European decent. Minoli Perera, PharmD, PhD, wants to change that. She is a pioneer in the area of pharmacogenomics in African-Americans and has some new discoveries to share.
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Improving Survival for Advanced Breast Cancer with Massimo Cristofanilli, MD

It is possible to improve and prolong the life of patients with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer, according to the results of a new phase III clinical trial. Massimo Cristofanilli, MD, principal investigator of the trial explains the results and the state of breast cancer in America today. 
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Diabetes Drug Could Help Prevent Air Pollution Deaths, Scott Budinger, MD

A common, safe and inexpensive drug for type 2 diabetes, metformin, decreases the risk of heart attacks and strokes triggered by particulate matter air pollution. Scott Budinger, MD, explains the study and other ways the drug could be used to protect people at risk of heart attack and
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Chronic Pain and the Placebo Effect with A. Vania Apkarian, PhD

Chronic pain, such as lower back pain that lasts for months or years, affects 100 million Americans and costs half a trillion dollars a year in healthcare costs. It is also contributing to the current opioid crisis. A. Vania Apkarian, PhD, explains his recent discoveries related to chronic pain and how placebos may be a very effective option for some.
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How to Stop Antibiotic Misuse with Jeffrey Linder, MD, MPH

Physicians are notorious for prescribing antibiotics to people who don't really need them. This can lead to dangerous side effects for patients. Jeffrey Linder, MD, MPH, has developed effective ways to reduce the number of inappropriate prescriptions. He explains how similar interventions can be used to address the prescription opioid crisis.
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New Ways to Diagnose Sleep and Circadian Rhythm Disorders with Phyllis Zee, MD, PhD

A new blood test developed at Northwestern has the potential to advance treatments of a variety of disorders and diseases. Phyllis Zee, MD, PhD, explains the test, which can reveal if an individual’s circadian clock is running too fast or too slow and how circadian clocks impact far more than sleep.
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High BMI and Pregnancy Weight Gain with Alan Peaceman, MD

More than 50 percent of women who are of childbearing age are overweight or obese, which may put them at risk for complications during pregnancy and child birth and affect their babies’ health, too. Alan Peaceman, MD, shares results of a new clinical trial, aimed to help these women safely reduce their weight gain with diet and exercise interventions.
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What Makes Someone a SuperAger? with Emily Rogalski, PhD

Some people’s brains are aging at a rate much slower than average. They are called SuperAgers, men and women over the age of 80 with the mental faculties of people decades younger. Emily Rogalski, PhD, has been studying SuperAgers for a decade and reveals some fascinating findings about their brains and lives.
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When Children Need Palliative Care with Kelly Michelson, MD, MPH

Anticipating, preventing and treating suffering is at the heart of excellent palliative care. Kelly Michelson, MD, MPH, discusses the importance palliative care in pediatric hospitals and how she works with young patients and their families when they're facing a deadly health condition.
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Wearable Technology in Medicine with John A. Rogers, PhD

John A. Rogers, PhD, has created a fleet of wireless, wearable devices that have the potential to change the way physicians collect data and treat patients, from NICU preemies to stroke patients in recovery.
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Continuing Medical Education Credit

Physicians who listen to this podcast may claim continuing medical education credit after listening to an episode of this program.

Target Audience

Academic/Research, Multiple specialties

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the research interests and initiatives of Feinberg faculty.
  2. Discuss new updates in clinical and translational research.
Accreditation Statement

The Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation Statement

The Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine designates this Enduring Material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

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