Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Faculty Profiles
Paul F Lindholm, MD

Paul F Lindholm, MD

Associate Professor of Pathology

Focus of Work

Bio

Our clinical laboratory performs tests to evaluate the function of platelets and the plasma hemostatic system for patients with blood clotting disorders. We employ platelet function assays to identify the effects of antiplatelet medications and platelet transfusion on platelet function for patients at risk of bleeding. We find that in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), reversing anti-platelet medication and increased platelet activity leads to improved clinical outcomes. We als...[Read full text]Our clinical laboratory performs tests to evaluate the function of platelets and the plasma hemostatic system for patients with blood clotting disorders. We employ platelet function assays to identify the effects of antiplatelet medications and platelet transfusion on platelet function for patients at risk of bleeding. We find that in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), reversing anti-platelet medication and increased platelet activity leads to improved clinical outcomes. We also use these assays to identify optimal conditions for safe surgical interventions for patients who have blood clotting disorders or are taking anticoagulants. We are participating in an exciting project to produce platelets from stem cells. The function of these culture-derived platelets is tested to identify optimal culture and storage conditions to obtain a high yield of functional platelets.
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Our research laboratory studies the mechanisms by which prostate cancer cells invade surrounding tissues and spread to distant sites in the body. Clinical prostate cancer tissues contain increased numbers of monocytes and macrophages. We have found that human monocyte-lineage cells cross-communicate with prostate cancer cells and this process leads to increased cancer cell invasion. This cross-communication involves cytokines and growth factors including monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) and increased cancer cell NF-¿B activity. We are investigating how these factors promote cancer cell invasion and metastasis and hope to identify molecular targets that could block prostate cancer progression.[Shorten text]

Keywords


Education and Certification

  • MD: University of Minnesota (1983)
  • Residency: Univ. of Minnesota Hospital & Clinic (1988)
  • Board Certification: Anatomic Pathology & Clinical Pathology, Blood Banking & Transfusion Medicine