Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Driskill Graduate Program in Life Sciences
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Events

The Walter S. and Lucienne Driskill Graduate Training Program in Life Sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine holds regular events, conferences and seminars. Find out more below.

Sep

19

FCVRRI Didactic Lecture

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Presented By: TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD

Feinberg Cardiovascular & Renal Research Institute

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Sep

20

New TA Conference

Evanston - 9:00 AM - 2:30 PM

The New TA Conference introduces graduate students to learning and teaching at Northwestern. Throughout the day, participants engage in discipline-specific and cross-disciplinary workshops and discussions aimed at helping graduate students prepare to teach.

NTAC is open to all graduate student and postdoctoral fellows with teaching responsibilities at Northwestern.

Order of Events:

9:00 AM - 9:30 AM: Registration & Breakfast (Tech Lobby)
9:30 AM - 10:00 AM: Welcoming Address (Ryan Auditorium)
10:15 AM - 11:45 AM: Discipline Specific Workshop (Tech Classrooms)
11:45 AM - 12:15 PM: Lunch Pick Up (Tech Lobby)
12:15 PM - 12:45 PM: Breakout Panel Discussions & Working Lunch (Lecture Rooms)
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM: Cross-Disciplinary Workshop on Learning & Teaching (Tech Classrooms)

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Sep

20

The CD95/Fas Ligand mRNA is Toxic to Cells

Chicago - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Marcus Peter, PhD

Tom D. Spies Profesor of Cancer Metabolism

Leader of the Translational Research in Solid Tumors (TRIST) Program

Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine

Chicago Campus

* Joint Lurie Cancer Center Basic Research / TRIST seminar

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Sep

21

Transitioning to High Quality Survivorship Care after Head and Neck Cancer

Off-Campus - 7:30 AM - 9:30 AM

Jonas T. Johnson, MD

Eugene N. Myers, MD Distinguished Service Professor and Chairman, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and

Marci Lee Nilsen, PhD, RN, CHPN

Assistant Professor, Department of Acute and Tertiary Care, School of Nursing

University of Pittsburgh

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Sep

21

TEAM/SDRC Seminar: Inhibition of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis: The Crucial Role of the Interplay Between Mutant p53 and Farnesylated DNAJA1

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University's TEAM Program and Northwestern's Skin Disease Research Center present:

Inhibition of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis: The Crucial Role of the Interplay Between Mutant p53 and Farnesylated DNAJA1

Xin Tong, PhD
Research Assistant Professor of Pathology (Guang-Yu Yang Lab)
Feinberg School of Medicine

Refreshments will be provided.

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Sep

21

"The Neurobiology of Temperature Sensing: from Genes to Circuits to Behavior"

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Dr. Marco Gallio with the department of Neurobiology, Northwestern University, Evanston

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Sep

25

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Pradeep K. Singh, MD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: The "Bacterial Swarm in Chronic Human Infections

Pradeep K. Singh, MD - University of Washington

Host: Alan Hauser, MD, PhD

Description:

Chronic infections involve long-term interactions between bacteria and their hosts, some lasting for decades. The chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections that afflict people with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic wounds are a prime example. This presentation will highlight recent findings on the evolution of diversity in bacterial populations causing chronic infections and discuss mechanisms and consequences of bacterial diversification in disease.

TBA

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Sep

27

Annual Chung Lee Lectureship-Targeting Androgen Receptor Nuclear Localization and Function in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

Chicago - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Zhou Wang, PhD

Professor, Departments of Urology, Pathology and Pharmacology

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Pittsburgh, PA

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Sep

28

"Assembly or Retinal Circuits: Cells and Synapses"

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Presented By:

Joshua Sanes, PhD
Jeff C. Tar Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology
Paul J. Finnegan Family Director,
Center for Brain Science
Harvard University

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Sep

28

"Intersections of Genes and Environment in Parkinson’s Disease"

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Tim Greenamyre, M.D., Ph.D.

The Greenamyre lab studies putative environment causes of Parkinson s disease (PD) and developed the rotenone model of PD, which provided the first proof of the concept that systemic mitochondrial impairment could lead to selective nigrostriatal degeneration and -synuclein (Lewy) pathology. Recent unpublished data show that trichloroethylene (TCE), an industrial solvent and prevalent groundwater contaminant implicated epidemiologically in PD risk, also causes selective nigrostriatal degeneration. Both rotenone and TCE induce endolysosomal dysfunction and pathological accumulation of pSer129- -synuclein, apparently as a consequence of activating Leucine-Rich-Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2), mutation of which is the most common genetic cause of PD. LRRK2 kinase inhibitors protect against rotenone-induced endolysosomal impairment, prevent pSer129- -synuclein accumulation and protect nigral dopamine neurons from degeneration. Thus, LRRK2 appears to play a central role in both genetic and environmental causes of PD.

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Oct

01

"Long-term Presynaptic Plasticity: Novel Functions and Mechanisms"

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Pablo Castillo, M.D., Ph.D.
Harold and Muriel Block Chair and Professor
Department of Neuroscience
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Abstract:

Long-term synaptic plasticity is critical for experience-induced neural adaptations in the brain. The mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity are diverse and can be typically due to postsynaptic receptor modifications, or changes in neurotransmitter release. While most research has focused on postsynaptic forms of plasticity, much less is known about how neural activity regulates neurotransmitter release in a long-term manner. Importantly, increasing evidence indicates that presynaptic plasticity is a potent regulator of circuit output that underlies several forms of learning. In his talk, Dr. Pablo Castillo (Professor of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine) will discuss recent discoveries on major molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying presynaptic plasticity in the rodent hippocampus.

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Oct

02

Microbiology-Immunology Department: K. Heran Darwin, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title:

Cytokinin Signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Functions and Consequences"

K. Heran Darwin, PhD - New York University

Host: Derek Walsh PhD

Description:

Tuberculosis (TB) kills about 1.5 million people globally every year, making it the leading causes of death by an infectious agent. My lab is working to understand how Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) persists in animals by characterizing substrates of the Mtb proteasome. We reported the identification of a proteasome substrate called lonely guy (Log) that catalyzes the synthesis of cytokinins, which had previously only been characterized as plant hormones. In my talk I will discuss the function of cytokinins in Mtb as well as discuss the consequences of making too many cytokinins, which may provide a new understanding of host-pathogen interactions.

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Oct

03

Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans

Evanston - 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans is a $90,000 merit-based fellowship exclusively for immigrants and children of immigrants who are pursuing graduate school in the United States. The application deadline is November 1, 2018.

The competition is mer-bitased. Selection criteria emphasize creativity, originality, initiative, and sustained accomplishment. The program values a commitment to Constitution and the Bill of Rights. The program does not have any quotas for types of degrees, universities or programs, countries of origin, or gender.

In order to be eligible for the Class of 2019 you must be a New American who is 30 or younger as of the application deadline, and who is planning on starting or continuing an eligible graduate degree program full time in the United States in the 2019-2020 academi year. Applicants may apply to the Fellowship at the same time that they are applying to graduate school, or after they are already enrolled in graduate school. However, applicants must not have started or passed the third year of the graduate program that they are seeking funding for in the 2019-20 academic year as of November 1, 2018.

For information on eligibility requirements go to the homepage.

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Oct

03

"A Model System to Develop Therapies for Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFpEF)"

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Presented By:

Steven Houser, PhD
Goodfriend Chair & Professor of Cardiovascular Research,
Department of Physiology
Senior Associate Dean for Research
Temple University School of Medicine

Feingberg Cardiovascular and Renal Research Institute

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Oct

04

Mitochondrial Anchors: Positioning the Powerhouse and More

Chicago - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Laura Lackner, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Molecular Biosciences

Northwestern University

Evanston Campus

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Oct

05

"A Cortical Gain Control Mechanism for Pain"

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Jing Wang, M.D., Ph.D.

The experience of pain is strongly shaped by emotional and cognitive processes, and yet cortical mechanisms for pain are poorly understood. We recently found that in rodents, persistent pain can induce a generalized, anatomically nonspecific increase in the aversive response to a noxious stimulus, similar to what patients of fibromyalgia or other chronic pain experience. Using a combination of optogenetics, in vivo electrophysiology and neuro-computation, we have identified a new cortical mechanism for this enhanced aversion. We found that the nociceptive response of a neuron in the PFC or anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is linked to its baseline firing rates through a linear gain control mechanism. Chronic or persistent pain enhances the basal firing rates, which in turn provides an enhanced gain factor in the nociceptive response in ACC neurons. Conversely, chronic pain reduces the gain of PFC neurons. Hence, cortical neurons possess an internal gain for the regulation of pain, and depending on the location and identity of these neurons, this gain control system can either magnify or diminish the pain experience. We have successfully applied this mechanism to neuromodulation, where we showed that a small stimulatory effect on the PFC, when temporally coupled with the time course of noxious stimulation, can have a dramatic effect on pain regulation. This gain control concept could provide a working mechanism for neuromodulatory techniques such as transcranial current stimulation.

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Oct

05

Research in Progress: Alfa Herrera and Hilary Truchan

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Alfa Herrera and Hilary Truchan

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Oct

09

NSF GRFP Information Workshop

Evanston - 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Social Sciences students are eligible to apply for the NSF-GRFP.

Rising seniors and first or second year graduate students should attend an informational meeting to learn more about the application process.

Unable to attend a meeting? Contact Stephen Hill.

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Oct

09

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Jae U. Jung, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title:

"Immunopathogenesis of Two Eemerging Arboviruses, Zika Virus and SFST Virus"

Jae U. Jung, PhD - University of Southern California

Hosts: Eva Gottwein, PhD & Richard Longnecker, PhD

Description:

The recent global (re)emergence of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) raises considerable public health concern. The re-emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection of pregnant women has been associated with microcephaly and nervous system malformations. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia virus (SFTSV) is an emerging Bunyavirus and has a fatality rate of 10-30% by causing multiple organ failure, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia. Understanding how ZIKV and SFTSV evade host immune system and cause diseases is the main topics of my talk.

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Oct

09

“Single Particle Cryo-EM of TRP Channels"

Chicago - 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

The Department of Pharmacology Seminar Series welcomes our guest speaker:

Dr. Yifan Cheng, Ph.D
Professor
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics
University of California San Francisco

As a laboratory specializes in electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM), we are interested in both methodologies and applications of this versatile technology to study structures and functions of various biological macromolecules. Of particular interests to us are studying integral membrane proteins and large dynamic macromolecular machineries, and developing enabling technologies to facilitate structural studies of these challenging macromolecules by cryo-EM.

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Oct

11

20th Annual Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium

Off-Campus - 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium has been called the most valuable breast cancer meeting worldwide for the practicing clinician. For 20 years, this multidisciplinary CME event has been bringing together leading national and international medical, surgical and radiation oncologists to present, debate and evaluate cutting-edge technology and approaches in the management of breast cancer. New options are occurring in all aspects of patient care including prevention, screening, and detection, as well as in the primary treatment modalities of surgery, radiation therapy, endocrine therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, novel biologic therapies as well as survivorship. This symposium focuses on the multidisciplinary cooperation that is required for the management of today's breast cancer patient.

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Oct

12

20th Annual Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium

Off-Campus - 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium has been called the most valuable breast cancer meeting worldwide for the practicing clinician. For 20 years, this multidisciplinary CME event has been bringing together leading national and international medical, surgical and radiation oncologists to present, debate and evaluate cutting-edge technology and approaches in the management of breast cancer. New options are occurring in all aspects of patient care including prevention, screening, and detection, as well as in the primary treatment modalities of surgery, radiation therapy, endocrine therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, novel biologic therapies as well as survivorship. This symposium focuses on the multidisciplinary cooperation that is required for the management of today's breast cancer patient.

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Oct

12

"Sensory Computation through the Lens of Behavior"

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Leslie Osborne, Ph.D.

Animals are capable of fast, accurate movements in response to sensory inputs. House flies can respond to each others turns in 30ms during a chase, major league baseball players can hit balls with 100ms to estimate where and when the ball will cross the plate. Performances like this indicate that sensory circuits are efficient, estimating target motion quickly, and that precision is not lost in translation from vision to action. The mapping between sensation and behavior cannot be static if it is to remain efficient. In the natural world, where the statistics of sensory stimuli fluctuate over a large range, circuits need to adapt to maintain neural and behavioral sensitivity. My talk will explore how cortical neurons maintain information rates under changing conditions and how adaptive coding keeps our eyes on the ball. But even the most efficient sensory computations take time, creating delays in behavioral responses. In order to catch what we chase, or connect with a baseball, we need to extrapolate estimates of target motion into the future. I will explore our first steps toward understanding the role of prediction in movement sensory-guided movement behavior.

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Oct

13

20th Annual Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium

Off-Campus - 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium has been called the most valuable breast cancer meeting worldwide for the practicing clinician. For 20 years, this multidisciplinary CME event has been bringing together leading national and international medical, surgical and radiation oncologists to present, debate and evaluate cutting-edge technology and approaches in the management of breast cancer. New options are occurring in all aspects of patient care including prevention, screening, and detection, as well as in the primary treatment modalities of surgery, radiation therapy, endocrine therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, novel biologic therapies as well as survivorship. This symposium focuses on the multidisciplinary cooperation that is required for the management of today's breast cancer patient.

more

Oct

14

20th Annual Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium

Off-Campus - 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium has been called the most valuable breast cancer meeting worldwide for the practicing clinician. For 20 years, this multidisciplinary CME event has been bringing together leading national and international medical, surgical and radiation oncologists to present, debate and evaluate cutting-edge technology and approaches in the management of breast cancer. New options are occurring in all aspects of patient care including prevention, screening, and detection, as well as in the primary treatment modalities of surgery, radiation therapy, endocrine therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, novel biologic therapies as well as survivorship. This symposium focuses on the multidisciplinary cooperation that is required for the management of today's breast cancer patient.

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Oct

15

Brain Tumor Patient & Caregiver Forum

Chicago - 3:00 PM - 7:00 PM

During this complimentary program for brain tumor patients and their families, our experts will discuss advances in brain tumor treatment, as well as skills and resources for managing the unique challenges faced by patients and caregivers. The program includes opportunities to ask questions and meet other brain tumor patients and their families. This program is sponsored by the Northwestern Medicine Lou and Jean Malnati Brain Tumor Institute of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

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Oct

16

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Kimberly A. Kline, MPH, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title:

"Mechanisms of Biofilm-Associated Enterococcus faecalis Infections"

Kimberly A. Kline, PhD - Nanyang Technological University, SINGAPORE

Host: Hank Seifert, PhD

Description:

The Gram-positive Enterococci are commensal inhabitants of the gastrointestinal tract, as well as opportunistic nosocomial pathogens associated with endocarditis, urinary tract infections (UTI), and wound infection. Many Enterococcal infections are difficult to treat due to their multi-drug resistance, association with bacterial biofilms, and polymicrobial nature. The goal of our research is to understand the molecular mechanisms by which Enterococcus faecalis interacts with other bacterial species and the host in the context of these polymicrobial, biofilm-associated infections.

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Oct

17

FCVRRI Didactic Lecture

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Presented By: TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD

Feinberg Cardiovascular & Renal Research Institute

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Oct

18

Deciphering the Multiple Pathways of HOXA5 Tumor Suppressor Action in Breast Cancer

Chicago - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Saraswati Sukumar, PhD

Professor, Department of Oncology and Pathology

Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center

Johns Hopkins Unversity School of Medicine

Baltimore, MA

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Oct

18

ASH/EHA Joint Symposium Lecture: GATA1 Deficiency Syndromes, from Congenital Anemia to AML and Myelofibrosis

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

John Crispino, PhD

Professor, Division of Hematology/Oncology

Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine

Chicago Campus

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Oct

19

Department of Physiology Seminar Series - Gary Miller, Ph.D.

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Gary Miller, Ph.D.

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Oct

19

Stem Cells & Regenerative Biology Seminar Series

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Presented By:

J. Paul Taylor, MD, PhD
HHMI Investigator
Chairman, Department of Cell & Molecular Biology
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

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Oct

22

"Understanding Breast Cancer Initiation in Single Cell Resolution"

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

The Department of Pharmacology Seminar Series welcomes our guest speaker:

Kai Kessenbrock, Ph.D
Assistant Professor
Department of Biological Chemistry
University of California, Irvine School of Medicine

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Oct

23

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Lena Al-Harthi, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "HIV Sanctuary Sites: The Brain/Peripheral Organ Connection

Lena Al-Harthi, PhD - Rush University

Host: Mojgan Naghavi, PhD

Description:

Twenty-five years ago, an HIV diagnosis meant a death sentence within 4-6 years. Thankfully, with advances in HV treatment, HIV has become a chronic disease, albeit with considerable co-morbid complications. Nonetheless, scientific efforts are focused on an HIV cure (e.g. eliminating the virus from the body). Those efforts have largely focused on the role of resting memory T cells. Yet, other sanctuary sites for HIV persist that will be a challenge to HIV cure initiatives. HIV enters the brain during acute HIV infection, yet there is an underappreciation for the role of the brain as a reservoir for HIV, largely because it is difficult to probe active virus replication in the brain and also to address how this virus may re-seed the periphery. In this presentation, I will share our body of work regarding the role of the brain, and particularly astrocytes, as an HIV reservoir. Specifically, I will address HIV infection of astrocytes, mechanisms that restrict productive infection, pathways that overcome this restriction, evidence for HIV latency in astrocytes, and HIV dissemination (egress) from the brain (infected astrocytes) to peripheral organs. Further, HIV and its inflammatory sequelae lead to HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), I will discuss the mechanisms driving HAND as they relate to dysregulation in astrocyte function and a novel biomarker for HAND. Our collective studies point to brain as a reservoir for HIV, which cannot be viewed as a separate HIV compartment but rather as a contributing source of HIV dissemination into other tissues and highlight the impact of HIV/inflammatory mediators in disrupting astrocytes function contributing to HAND.

r. Al-Harthi s research is focused on defining mechanism(s) driving HIV neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and HIV latency in the central nervous system. Specifically, she studies the role of astrocytes in HAND and HIV latency/persistence. To date, her body of work has demonstrated that HIV replication in astrocytes is restricted through robust expression of b-catenin signaling, which blocks HIV transcription. Yet, this restriction is overcome by inflammatory mediators allowing for bursts of productive HIV replication and persistence of HIV in astrocytes. Disruption of b-catenin in astrocytes in turn dysregulates astrocyte function leading to neuronal injury. More recently, she developed an innovative xenotransplantation model of human astrocytes into humanized mice to demonstrate that HIV in astrocytes can re-seed peripheral organs contributing to dissemination of HIV throughout the body.

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Oct

24

Writing Effective Teaching Statements: Getting Started

Evanston - 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Beginning to draft a Teaching Statement can be a challenging process, particularly for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who may have limited teaching experience.

In this workshop, participants will learn about the characteristics of successful teaching statements and engage in the Generative Knowledge Interview process, which uses key moments as learners or teachers to help frame the value of teaching in their teaching statements.

Participants will leave the workshop with a deeper understanding of the conventions of strong teaching statements and generated content for a teaching statement draft.

The workshop is open to graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from all departments and disciplines, at all stages of drafting their teaching statements.

Facilitators:

Lauren M. Woods, PhD

Lauren Woods is the CIRTL at Northwestern Postdoctoral Fellow in STEM Education at Northwestern University s Searle Center for Advancing Learning and Teaching. She holds a B.A. in Zoology from Ohio Wesleyan University and a Ph.D. in Evolution, Ecology, and Population Biology from Washington University in St. Louis. CIRTL, or the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning, is an NSF center that seeks to train STEM graduate students in order to develop a national STEM faculty committed to advancing effective teaching practices for diverse student audiences.

Kate Flom Derrick

Kate is the Senior Program Coordinator of Graduate and Postdoctoral Learning at the Searle Center. She earned her Masters in Writing, Rhetoric, and Discourse with a concentration in Teaching Langauge and Writing from DePaul University, where she also taught in the First-Year Writing program. Before joining the Searle Center in 2017, she had over nine years of Writing Center experience working with student and faculty populations.

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Oct

25

Microbilogy-Immunology Department: Edward S. Mocarski, PhD

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Title: "Alternative Cell Death Pathways in Antiviral Host Defense"

Special Microbiology-Immunology and Virology Club Seminar

Edward Mocarski, PhD, Emory University

Host: Richard Longnecker, PhD

Description:

Herpesviruses and other large DNA viruses elaborate cell death suppressors that reveal how these pathways contribute to host defense. Virus-encoded inhibitors block cell autonomous death pathways in order to sustain infection. Accumulating evidence indicates that programmed cell death pathways in mice, the model mammal, such as caspase-8-mediated apoptosis, caspase-11-dependent pyroptosis, and RIPK3-MLKL-dependent necroptosis all evolved primarily for host defense. Although apoptosis is observed throughout multicellular organisms, pyroptosis and necroptosis are only observed in mammals. Necroptosis is an alternate death pathway that is triggered by caspase-8 compromise and is a potent means of eliminating infected cells. Virus-induced necroptosis depends on the protein kinase activity of RIPK3 to phosphorylate MLKL, a pore-forming protein that executes cell leakage after allosteric activation by binding highly phosphorylated inositol phosphate. Necroptosis is naturally induced by murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) through the Z-nucleic acid binding protein (ZBP)1 (also called DAI and DLM1), a pathogen sensor that recruits and activates RIPK3 via common RIP homotypic interaction motifs (RHIMs). MCMV M45 encodes the viral inhibitor of RIP activation (vIRA), a RHIM-signaling inhibitor that prevents recruitment of RIPK3 during infection of cells and mice.

Over the course of the last eight years, human CMV, as well as herpes simplex virus (HSV) and vaccinia virus (VACV) have been shown to inhibit ZBP1-RIPK3-MLKL necroptosis, and influenza has been shown to be naturally susceptible to ZBP1-induced necroptosis and apoptosis. The evidence that virus-induced necroptosis is highly potent derives from work on MCMV and VACV, where viral mutants that fail to block activation of RIPK3 cannot infect mice due to the uniform death of cells at the inoculation site. Thus, necroptosis represents the most potent form of cell autonomous innate host defense to prevent infection and reduce the likelihood of dissemination within the host.

HSV1 and HSV2 encode an M45 homolog (RR1, UL39-encoded ICP6) that has been shown to block RHIM signaling and prevent necroptosis in human cells. ICP6 exhibits species specificity and acts to promote necroptosis in mouse cells and in mice by functioning as a RHIM-dependent activator of RIPK3. Recent studies have shown that ICP6 RHIM mutant virus nevertheless retains the ability to induce necroptosis in mice; however, this virus-induced death is dependent on ZBP1 RHIM-dependent recruitment of RIPK3, a pathway strikingly similar to MCMV M45 mutant virus. Thus, HSV1 infection of mouse cells induces necroptosis via two distinct RHIM-dependent mechanisms in mice, one dependent on the ICP6 RHIM-mediated recruitment of RIPK3 and one triggered via the pathogen sensor ZBP1. Like MCMV M45 RHIM mutant virus, ICP6 RHIM mutant HSV1 pathogenesis becomes normalized during infection of Zbp1-/-, Ripk3-/- and Mlkl-/- mice. Importantly, in human HT-29 cells, which are commonly employed for studies on TNF-induced necroptosis (RIPK1-RIPK3-MLKL pathway), lack sufficient ZBP1 to support virus-induced necroptosis. ZBP1-transduced HT-29 cells are susceptible to virus-induced death depending on the Z nucleic acid binding domains, Zalpha1 and Zalpha2. Transcription is necessary for the execution of virus-induced necroptosis, suggesting that, like MCMV, vaccinia and influenza, cell death is initiated by ZBP1 sensing of dsRNA rather than viral DNA, an area that is under active investigation. Thus, virus-induced ZBP1-RIPK3-MLKL necroptosis is likely to be a feature of natural infection in humans but is masked when WT HSV1 is in the non-natural mouse host due to ICP6 RHIM-triggered death.

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Oct

29

Joint Pharmacology & Center for Advanced Microscopy Seminar: Jeffery Bylund, Ph.D.

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Jeffery B. Bylund, PhD
Applications Manager, Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine
Nikon Instruments

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Oct

30

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Hank Seifert, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title:

Location, Location, Location: Evolution and Pathogenesis of the Human-Restricted Neisseria

Hank Seifert, PhD - Northwestern University

Host: Driskill Graduate Program

Description:

There are several Neisseria species that live only within humans but only, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis have acquired the ability to cause disease. There are several distinguishing characteristics of the pathogenic Neisseria including several different diversity generation systems and the ability to induce neutrophil inflammation while resisting killing by neutrophils. I will discuss my laboratory s work on the mechanisms allowing N. gonorrhoeae to promote pilus antigenic variation, evade neutrophil killing, and how the pathogenic species may have evolved from a commensal progenitor.

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Nov

06

Writing Effective Teaching Statements: Peer Review

Evanston - 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Teaching statements are an important component of many academic job applications, but they can be challenging to write. Receiving feedback from peers can provide you with recommendations on how to clarify and improve your main claims about your teaching. Allowing others to read your writing can also give you critical insight into how your target audience may understand and interpret your claims, which can help further refine your teaching statement.

In this workshop, participants will bring their teaching statement drafts and engage in guided peer feedback.

This workshop is open to graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from all departments and disciplines who have a draft of their teaching statement.

Please bring three hard copies of your teaching statement draft to the workshop.

Facilitators:

Lauren M. Woods, PhD

Lauren Woods is the CIRTL at Northwestern Postdoctoral Fellow in STEM Education at Northwestern University s Searle Center for Advancing Learning and Teaching. She holds a B.A. in Zoology from Ohio Wesleyan University and a Ph.D. in Evolution, Ecology, and Population Biology from Washington University in St. Louis. CIRTL, or the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning, is an NSF center that seeks to train STEM graduate students in order to develop a national STEM faculty committed to advancing effective teaching practices for diverse student audiences.

Kate Flom Derrick

Kate is the Senior Program Coordinator of Graduate and Postdoctoral Learning at the Searle Center. She earned her Masters in Writing, Rhetoric, and Discourse with a concentration in Teaching Langauge and Writing from DePaul University, where she also taught in the First-Year Writing program. Before joining the Searle Center in 2017, she had over nine years of Writing Center experience working with student and faculty populations.

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Nov

06

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Billy Tsai, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title:

"Hijacking Host Components to Promote Infection by DNA Tumor Vruses"

Billy Tsai, PhD - University of Michigan

Host: Gregory A. Smith, PhD

Description:

Our lab is focused on understanding how viruses hijack host cell factors to cause disease. In particular, we seek to clarify the entry mechanism of DNA tumor viruses including polyomavirus and papillomavirus, as well as RNA viruses belonging to the flavivirus family including Dengue and Zika viruses. Our studies have revealed a rather striking conservation in entry mechanism between these viruses. For instance, we discovered how machineries within the endoplasmic reticulum are exploited by these viruses to promote infection. These findings raise the possibility that there may be a common anti-viral strategy against diseases caused by these viruses.

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Nov

07

FCVRRI Molecular Cardiology Seminar Series

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Presented By:

Douglas L. Mann, MD
Lewin Chair & Chief, Cardiovascular Division
Professor, Medicine, Cell Biology, and Physiology
Washington University School of Medicine

Feingberg Cardiovascular and Renal Research Institute

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Nov

09

Stem Cells & Regenerative Biology Seminar Series

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Presented By:

Shelley Berger, PhD
Daniel S. Och University Professor
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology
Perelman School of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania

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Nov

10

Lurie Cancer Center Multidisciplinary Head & Neck Symposium

Chicago - 7:45 AM - 5:45 PM

The Lurie Cancer Center Multidisciplinary Head & Neck Symposium is a one and one-half day interactive program on the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of head and neck cancer patients held on November 10-11, 2018, in Chicago, Illinois. The symposium brings together medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, otolaryngologists, head and neck surgeons, dentists, nurses and allied health professionals to discuss and debate the latest advances in multidisciplinary therapies, clinical research and supportive care methodology. The agenda features internationally-recognized experts who will engage attendees in dialogue to improve multi-specialty collaboration in the treatment and care of head and neck cancer patients.

Conference Chair: Sandeep Samant, MD

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Nov

11

Lurie Cancer Center Multidisciplinary Head & Neck Symposium

Chicago - 8:00 AM - 1:15 PM

The Lurie Cancer Center Multidisciplinary Head & Neck Symposium is a one and one-half day interactive program on the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of head and neck cancer patients held on November 10-11, 2018, in Chicago, Illinois. The symposium brings together medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, otolaryngologists, head and neck surgeons, dentists, nurses and allied health professionals to discuss and debate the latest advances in multidisciplinary therapies, clinical research and supportive care methodology. The agenda features internationally-recognized experts who will engage attendees in dialogue to improve multi-specialty collaboration in the treatment and care of head and neck cancer patients.

Conference Chair: Sandeep Samant, MD

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Nov

12

Department of Pharmacology Seminar Series: Dr. Jianming Jiang

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

The Deparmtent of Pharmacology welcomes Jianming Jiang, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine.

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Nov

13

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Benjamin Gewurz, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "CRISPR/Cas9 Genetic Analysis of the Epstein-Barr Virus Lifecycle

Benjamin Gewurz, PhD

Harvard University

Hosts: Dr. Eva Gottwein and Richard Longnecker

Description:

Epstein-Barr virus is associated with multiple human cancers, including lymphomas of immunosuppressed hosts, Burkitt and Hodgkin lymphoma, nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas. To gain insights into host factors that control key aspects of the EBV lifecycle, we are using CRISPR/Cas9 screens and temporal proteomic maps of viral latent and lytic infection states. This approach is highlighting vulnerabilities that may ultimately be exploited to selectively target EBV-infected cancers.

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Nov

16

"Mechanisms of Epilepsy"

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Paul S. Buckmaster, Ph.D.

Abstract: Temporal lobe epilepsy is common and can be difficult to treat. The cause of seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy is unknown. We use anatomical and electrophysiological techniques to evaluate animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy, including sea lions, to test the hippocampal formation s role in generating spontaneous seizures.

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Nov

19

The OncoPPi Network: Cancer- Associated Protein-Protein Interaction Networks for Therapeutic Target Discovery

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

The Department of Pharmacology welcomes, Dr. Haian Fu, Ph., Associate Dean for Innovation and International Strategies at Emory University School of Medicine.

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Nov

20

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Jun Huang, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "T-Cell Recognition and Differentiation"

Jun Hung, PHD - University of Chicago

Host: Chyung-Ru Wang, PhD

Description:

Our lab carries out basic research with a focus on molecular mechanisms of T cell recognition, as well as translational research with the objective of developing immunotherapies for cancer and HIV. This seminar will discuss our recent works on pMHC dodecamer technology development, CD28 as the primary target for PD-1-mediated inhibition, and the role of histone methyltransferase EZH2 in Tfh cell differentiation.

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Nov

21

FCVRRI Didactic Lecture

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Presented By: TBD
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Feinberg Cardiovascular & Renal Research Institute

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Nov

27

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Nels Elde, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "The Evolutionary Potential of Poxviruses"

Nels Elde, PhD - University of Utah

Host: Virology Graduate Students/ Coordinator Nathan Meade, PhD (Lab of Derek Walsh)

Description:

We use experimental evolution, genomic analysis, and related approaches to investigate how poxviruses adapt to counteract host immune defenses. The work is revealing an array of recombination-driven processes and mechanisms of adaptation involving horizontal gene transfer. Our studies highlight the unique biology of poxvirus evolution.

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Nov

30

“Circuit Defects Underlying Impaired Perceptual Learning in Fragile X Syndrome”

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Carlos Portera-Cailliau, M.D.

To uncover the circuit-level alterations that underlie atypical sensory processing associated with autism, we have adopted a symptom-to-circuit approach in the Fmr1-/- mouse model of Fragile X syndrome (FXS). Using a go/no-go task and in vivo 2-photon calcium imaging, we find that impaired visual discrimination in Fmr1-/- mice correlates with marked deficits in orientation tuning of principal neurons, and a decrease in the activity of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons in primary visual cortex. Restoring visually evoked activity in PV cells in Fmr1-/-mice with a chemogenetic (DREADD) strategy was sufficient to rescue their behavioral performance. Strikingly, human subjects with FXS exhibit similar impairments in visual discrimination asFmr1-/- mice. These results suggest that manipulating inhibition may help sensory processing in FXS. More recently, we find that the ability of Fmr1-/- mice to perform the visual discrimination task is also drastically impaired in the presence of visual or auditory distractors, suggesting that sensory hypersensitivity may affect higher order perceptual learning in autism.

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Dec

04

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Harry Mobley, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title:

"Gene Expression and Growth Rates During Human Infection"

Harry Mobley, PhD - University of Michigan

Host: Hank Seifert, PhD

Description:

Our traditional definition of bacterial virulence has been based on in vitro measurements of adherence, iron acquisition, toxin activity, protein secretion, and motility. Now we must consider what metabolic pathways are in play, what transport systems must be active, and, most importantly, which genes are actually being expressed during human infection. Novel techniques including RNA-Seq and Tn-Seq allow us to identify the most highly expressed genes and which genes are essential during actual infections. In addition, methods to measure in vivo growth rates help us understand the kinetics of infection. This leads to a better understanding of how bacterial pathogens outfox our immune defenses.

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Dec

05

FCVRRI Molecular Cardiology Seminar Series

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Presented By:

Rong Tian, MD, PhD
Director, Mitochondria & Metabolism Center
Professor, Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, and Bioengineering
University of Washington

Feingberg Cardiovascular and Renal Research Institute

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Dec

07

Department of Physiology Seminar Series - Charles Wilson, Ph.D.

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Charles Wilson, Ph.D.

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Dec

11

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Andrea Sant, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "The Contributions of CD4 T Cells to Protective Immunity to Influenza Infection"

Andrea Sant, PhD

University of Rochester

Host: Melissa Brown, PhD

Description:

Research focus: Our research seeks to understand the elements in vivo that dictate the selective specificities in CD4 T cells during protective immune responses, and the competitive events that shape selective recognition of foreign and pathogenic organisms in vivo. We are particularly interested in the links between the viral antigen specificity and function of CD4 T cells in response to influenza virus infection and vaccination. Most recently, we have begun to explore influenza virus tropism in the lung and the function of influenza specific CD4 T cells that deliver effector function at this site. To address these research topics, our lab utilizes approaches such as novel, recombinant fluorescent reporter viruses, multiparameter flow cytometry, and different animal models of infection and vaccination . We are also developing vaccine candidates to promote the needed effector function to protect the host against influenza virus infection.

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Dec

14

Department of Physiology Seminar Series - Tim Cope, Ph.D.

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Tim Cope, Ph.D.

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Dec

14

Stem Cells & Regenerative Biology Seminar Series

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Presented By:

Tobias Walther, PhD
Professor of Genetics and Complex Diseases (Harvard T.H. Chan SPH)
Professor of Cell Biology
HHMI Investigator
Harvard Medical School

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Dec

18

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Colleen Furey

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "The Role of +TIPs and Microtubule Dynamics in HSV-1 Infection of Neuronal and Non-Neuronal Cell Types"

Colleen Furey

Graduate Student, Driskill Graduate Program in the Life Sciences (DGP)

Lab of Derek Walsh, PhD

Northwestern University

Description:

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Dec

19

FCVRRI Didactic Lecture

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Presented By: TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD

Feinberg Cardiovascular & Renal Research Institute

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