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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Driskill Graduate Program in Life Sciences
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Events

The Walter S. and Lucienne Driskill Graduate Training Program in Life Sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine holds regular events, conferences and seminars. Find out more below.

Sep

17

Basic Research Seminar: Preserving CTLA4 Immune Checkpoint for Safer and More Effective Cancer Immunotherapy

Chicago - 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

The Basic Research Seminar Series of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer of Northwestern University presents:

Preserving CTLA4 Immune Checkpoint for Safer and More Effective Cancer Immunotherapy

Yang Liu, PhD
Director, Division of Immunotherapy
Professor of Surgery
Institute of Human Virology
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Host: Bin Zhang, MD, PhD

Light lunch provided.

The Basic Research Seminar series presents prominent basic science speakers weekly to inspire and promote ongoing cancer research at Northwestern University.

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Sep

18

Annual Narahashi Lecture, Nieng Yan, Ph.D. - "Structural and Mechanistic Investigations of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels"

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

The Department of Pharmacology and the Driskill Graduate Program welcome Nieng Yan, Ph.D. as our lecturer for the 6th Annual Narahashi Lecture and Distinguished Lectures in Life Sciences.

Please join us for a reception immediately following the lecture in Ryan Family Atrium.

Nieng Yan, Ph.D.
Shirley M. Tilghman Professor of Molecular Biology
Princeton University

"Structural and Mechanistic Investigations of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels"

The voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are responsible for the initiation and propagation of action potentials. Being associated with a variety of channelopathies, they are targeted by multiple pharmaceutical drugs and natural toxins. We determined the crystal structure of a bacterial Nav channel NavRh in a potentially inactivated state a few years ago, which is a homotetramer in primary sequence but exhibits structural asymmetry. Employing the modern methods of cryo-EM, we determined the near atomic resolution structures of a Nav channel from American cockroach (designated NavPaS) and from electric eel (designated EeNav1.4). Most recently, we have determined the cryo-EM structures of the human Nav channels, Nav1.2, Nav1.4, and Nav1.7 in complex with distinct auxiliary subunits and toxins.These structures reveal the folding principle and structural details of the single-chain eukaryotic Nav channels that are distinct from homotetrameric voltage-gated ion channels. Unexpectedly, the two structures were captured in drastically different states. Whereas the structure of NavPaS has a closed pore and the four VSDs in distinct conformations, that of EeNav1.4 and the human channels is open at the intracelluar gate with VSDs exhibiting similar up states. The most striking conformational differenc occurs to the III-IV linker, which is essential for fast inactivation. Based on the structural features, we suggest an allosteric blocking mechanism for fast inactivation of Nav channels by the IFM motif. Structural comparison of the conformationally distinct Nav channels provides important insights into the electromechanical coupling mechanism of Nav channels and offers the 3D template to map hundredes of disease mutations.

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Sep

19

Immunometabolism and Cancer Minisymposium

Chicago - 1:00 PM - 4:45 PM

A joint minisymposium of the Carcinogenesis T32 CA009560 Training Program and the Membranes, Organelles and Metabolism (MOM) Program of the Lurie Cancer Center:

Weaponizing Metabolism to Enhance Cancer Immunotherapy
Jonathan David Powell, MD, PhD
Associate Director, Bloomberg Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy,
Professor of Oncology and Pharmacology
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Skewed NK Cell Metabolism and Effector Function by Tumor-Derivative NKG2D Ligands
Jennifer D Wu, PhD
Mary and Patrick Scanlan Professor, Professor of Urology and Microbiology-Immunology
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Tumor Microenvironment Metabolism and Its Role in Immune Activation, Regulation, and Response to Immunotherapy
Greg M. Delgoffe, PhD
Assistant Professor, Tumor Microenvironment Center, Department of Immunology
University of Pittsburgh

Mapping T Cell Metabolism In Vivo: New Insights Using Metabolomics
Russell Jones, PhD
Professor, Center for Cancer and Cell Biology; Program Lead, Metabolic and Nutritional Programming, Center for Cancer and Cell Biology
Van Andel Institute

Light refreshments provided. Reception to follow from 4:45 5:45 PM outside of Daniel Hale Williams Auditorium.

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Sep

20

The Under-recognized Translational Significant in Many Disorders, Including Cancer, Trauma, Intracranial Hemorrhage and Thrombolytic Therapy

Chicago - 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Hau Kwaan, MD, PhD

Marjorie S Barnett Professor of Medicine

Division of Hematology/Oncology

Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine

Chicago Campus

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Sep

20

Department of Microbiology-Immunology: Richard P. Sora, PhD

Chicago - 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Title:

"Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 2A Accelerates Lymphoma Development Through p27Kip1 Degradation and Increased PRMT5 Expression"

Speaker

Richard P. Sora, Ph.D.Northwestern University - Driskill Graduate Program in Life Sciences
Management for Scientists and Engineers Certification - Kellogg Business School
Carcinogenesis Training Grant Recipient

Host

Richard Longnecker, PhD

Topic

Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a B cell cancer that develops primarily in children and is associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The EBV latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) accelerates tumor development in a mouse model of BL. My studies show blocking degradation of the cell cycle regulatory protein p27Kip1 prevents this accelerated tumor development. I also show LMP2A expression results in increased levels of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5), which may also contribute to the accelerated tumor development driven by LMP2A.

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Sep

23

Cancer and Physical Sciences (CAPS) Webinar: What is the Bionanoprobe?

Online - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Cancer and Physical Sciences (CAPS) Webinar:

What is the Bionanoprobe?

Si Chen, PhD
Physicist
X-ray Science Division | Advanced Photon Source
Argonne National Laboratory

To join the webinar: https://bluejeans.com/863798950

To join via phone:

1) +1.312.216.0325 (US - Chicago)
+1.408.317.9253 (Alternate number)
+1.888.240.2560 (US Toll Free)
Global Numbers: www.bluejeans.com/premium-numbers
2) Enter Meeting ID: 863 798 950
3) Press #

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Sep

23

Pharmacologic Tools Probe Mitochondrial Behavior in Health and Disease

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Madesh Muniswamy, Ph.D.
Professor of Nephrology
University of Texas - San Antonio

The Muniswamy laboratory currently explores cutting-edge optical imaging-based methods to address major questions pertaining to explore the phenomenon referred as mitochondrial shape transition (MIST), a process that is independent of fission or fusion (Cell Reports 2018). With these observations, we currently are employing new pharmacologic tools to probe organellar communication and cell function. Our hope is to offer deeper insights behind inter-organellar communication that might be exploited to precisely treat various forms of disease.

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Sep

25

"General Overview of Cardiovascular Biology" Didactic Lecture

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Presented By:


Hossein Ardehali, MD, PhD
Director, Feinberg Cardiovascular and Renal Research Institute- Center for Molecular Cardiology
Professor of Cardiology and Pharmacology
Northwestern University


Feinberg Cardiovascular & Renal Research Institute

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Sep

26

Department of Surgery Research Conference

Chicago - 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Research residents, postdocs, staff, and other present their research projects in a bimonthly conference. Any Faculty and Research Staff are welcome to attend and learn.

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Sep

27

"Targeting Stem Cells for Neurodevelopmental Disorders"

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Xinyu Zhao, Ph.D.

My laboratory investigates the molecular mechanisms regulating neurodevelopment. Using mouse genetics and human pluripotent stem cells as models, we interrogate the mechanism underlying impaired neurogenesis in neurodevelopmental disorders. One of the proteins that we are studying is Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), a brain-enriched RNA-binding protein. Functional loss of FMRP leads to Fragile X syndrome, the most common monogenetic form of inherited intellectual disability and the largest single genetic contributor to autism. We have discovered that FMRP regulates postnatal and adult neurogenesis and uncovered underlying mechanisms such as altered epigenetic state and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our work has unveiled a number of novel therapeutic targets for neurodevelopmental disorders.

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Sep

28

Survive & Thrive - Ovarian Cancer Patient & Caregiver Program

Chicago - 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

On Saturday, September 28, the Lurie Cancer Center will host Survive & Thrive, a one-day interactive course for women living with ovarian cancer past or present or those at increased risk of developing the disease, along with their families and caregivers. This course will provide current information, valuable resources, access to experts in the field, and an opportunity to connect with others in the ovarian cancer community in a warm and supportive environment.

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Sep

30

Allosteric Modulation of Glutamate Receptors

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Stephen F Traynelis, Ph.D.
Professor of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology
Emory University School of Medicine

Abstract:
NMDA receptors mediate a slow, Ca2+-permeable component of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). These receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that are tetrameric assemblies of two glycine-binding GluN1 subunits and two glutamate-binding GluN2 subunits. There are four different genes encoding GluN2 (GRIN2A, GRIN2B, GRIN2C, GRIN2D), which are each expressed with a unique spatial profile throughout the CNS at different developmental stages. The different GluN2 subunits control the temporal signaling properties of the receptors, which likely allows different subunits to mediate different roles in development and circuit function. NMDA receptors require the binding of both glutamate and glycine in order to open the pore, which is triggered by protein rearrangements secondary to agonist-induced closure of a bi-lobed agonist binding domain that resembles a clamshell. We hypothesize that three key gating elements control opening of the ion-conducting pore following agonist binding. These elements include the 9 highly conserved residues (SYTANLAAF) that comprise the extracellular end of the M3 transmembrane helix, the short two turn helix that is parallel to the plane of the membrane and precedes the M1 transmembrane helix, and the short linker preceding the M4 transmembrane helix (Amin et al., 2018; Chen et al., 2017; Gibb et al., 2018, Yuan et al., 2014). A considerable amount of data implicates these regions in gating, including the observation that regions of the genes encoding these portions of the polypeptide chain are devoid of variation in the human population, yet are a locus for disease-causing mutations in patients with neurological disease (XiangWei et al., 2018). We have studied the functional consequences of these de novo mutations, which have diverse effects on the process of channel gating. Our results included the identification of a mutation in the pre-M1 helix that reduced single channel conductance (Ogden et al., 2017), which is rare for receptor mutations that lie outside of the pore-forming regions. These data suggest that the pre-M1 helix may influence the geometry and characteristics of the open pore. Consistent with this idea, we have identified several allosteric modulators that appear to act at the pre-M1 region and can also reduce single channel conductance, an effect not previously observed for exogenous modulators of NMDA receptor function. For example, the thienopyrimidone EU1622 series of positive allosteric modulators of NMDA receptor function (Perszyk et al., Soc Neuroscience Annual Meeting, 2014) have structural determinants in the pre-M1 region. Members of this class can reduce single channel conductance while still potentiating the maximally effective current. Chord conductance levels of NMDA receptors on cultured cortical neurons changed from 52, 44 pS in vehicle (0.2% DMSO) to 42, 35, and 28 pS in 50 M EU1622-14 (mean from 7 outside out patches recorded at -80 mV, SEM varied between 0.5-1.1 pS). Given that the pre-M1 region might influence the properties of the pore, we explored the mechanism underlying this effect, and discovered that one modulator that reduces conductance can also alter the relative permeability ratio for cations. We found that EU1622-14 reduced the relative permeability of Ca2+ to Na+ for recombinant GluN1/GluN2A and GluN1/GluN2B receptors expressed in HEK cells by more than 2-fold (p<0.05 for both receptors, One-way ANOVA, post-hoc t-test of drug vs vehicle, Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, F3,28 = 6.91). This represents the first example to our knowledge of an exogenous drug-like allosteric modulator that can interact with the NMDAR protein complex to alter the relative permeability of ions, which has important implications. The result is perhaps intuitively understandable, as any change in the diameter or electrostatic properties of the pore that alters unitary conductance would be unlikely to do so in a manner that equally affects the permeability of ions with different diameters and distinct hydration shells. Rather, it seems likely that ions with unique atomic radii will have a different relative permeability when the pore diameter or electrostatic environment changes. These findings highlight important biophysical considerations about how the NMDA receptor tetrameric complex controls pore diameter and related properties. In addition, the precedent that Ca2+ permeability can be controlled pharmacologically creates a new potential therapeutic target (i.e. regulation of ionic selectivity) with intriguing possibilities, such as future development of positive allosteric modulators of NMDA receptor function that do not elevate intracellular Ca2+ to potentially pathological levels.

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Oct

01

Department of Microbiology-Immunology: Alejandro Balazs, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: Escapability of HIV Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies is the Major
Driver of Therapeutic Efficacy

Speaker: Alejandro Balazs, Phd, Harvard University

Host: Pablo Penaloza-MacMaster, PhD

Topic:

Dr. Alejandro B. Balazs is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at
Harvard Medical School and a Principal Investigator at the Ragon
Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard in Cambridge, MA. Dr. Balazs received
his PhD from Harvard University and conducted postdoctoral research at
the California Institute of Technology prior to joining the faculty at
Harvard Medical School in 2014. He leads a laboratory that explores the
fundamental mechanisms by which the immune system prevents the
establishment of infection by employing immunological engineering as a
tool to dissect the underpinnings of protection mediated by the natural
immune system. His group is focused on applying this understanding to
the development and implementation of novel technologies to engineer
immunity as an alternative approach towards preventing or treating
infection.

5. Recent studies identifying antibodies from infected patients that can
neutralize diverse strains of HIV have changed the landscape of vaccine
design. While these broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) are the
ultimate goal of any future vaccine, a range of approaches is being
explored to generate this class of antibody de novo in patients. This
presentation will focus on the use of viral vectors as a means of
producing these proteins in vivo. We demonstrate that these antibodies
are capable of generating potent protection against challenge with
replication competent HIV in humanized mice. We also find that bNAbs
are capable of suppressing actively replicating HIV infections, which
may form the basis of a novel therapeutic regimen for infected patients.

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Oct

01

Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans - Info Session

Evanston - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Juniors, Seniors, and First-Year Graduate Students join us!

Deputy Director Yulian Ramos will be visiting campus to discuss The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans, which honors the contributions of immigrants and children of immigrants to the United States.


Each year, the program invests in the graduate education of 30 New Americans immigrants and children of immigrants who are poised to make significant contributions to US society, culture or their academic field.


Each Fellow receives up to $90,000 in financial support over two years, and they join a lifelong community of New American Fellows.

RSVP to fellowships@northwestern.edu.

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Oct

03

21st Annual Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium

Off-Campus -

Referred to as the most valuable breast cancer meeting worldwide for the practicing clinician, the Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium provides 3.5 days of formal presentations and interactive case discussions. For over 20 years, this multidisciplinary CME program has been bringing together leading national and international medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists to present, debate, and evaluate cutting-edge technology and approaches in the management of breast cancer.

Progress across all aspects of patient care, including prevention, screening, detection, and survivorship, as well as in the primary treatment modalities of surgery, radiation therapy, endocrine therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and novel biologic therapies are leading to new strategies and therapeutic options. The symposium focuses on the close cooperation required for effective multidisciplinary management of patients with breast cancer.

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Oct

03

Chung Lee Lectureship: Exploiting Unique Prostate Cancer Phenotypes to Improve Detection and Treatment

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM

The Basic Research Seminar Series of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer of Northwestern University presents:

Chung Lee Lectureship: Exploiting Unique Prostate Cancer Phenotypes to Improve Detection and Treatment

David F. Jarrard, MD
Professor Urologic Surgery
Clinical Vice Chair
John P. Livesey Chair in Urologic Oncology
Associate Director for Translational Research, Carbone Cancer Center
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

Host: Robin Leikin, PhD

Light refreshments provided.

The annual Chung Lee Lectures pay tribute to Chung Lee, PhD, Professor Emeritus in Urology and his many contributions to the Lurie Cancer Center and the field of prostate cancer research at the Feinberg School of Medicine.

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Oct

04

21st Annual Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium

Off-Campus -

Referred to as the most valuable breast cancer meeting worldwide for the practicing clinician, the Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium provides 3.5 days of formal presentations and interactive case discussions. For over 20 years, this multidisciplinary CME program has been bringing together leading national and international medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists to present, debate, and evaluate cutting-edge technology and approaches in the management of breast cancer.

Progress across all aspects of patient care, including prevention, screening, detection, and survivorship, as well as in the primary treatment modalities of surgery, radiation therapy, endocrine therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and novel biologic therapies are leading to new strategies and therapeutic options. The symposium focuses on the close cooperation required for effective multidisciplinary management of patients with breast cancer.

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Oct

04

Department of Physiology Seminar - Ulli Bayer, Ph.D.

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Ulli Bayer, Ph.D.

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Oct

04

TEAM/SBDRC Seminar: Development of a B-Cell-Based Vaccine to Treat Glioblastoma

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University's TEAM Program and Northwestern's Skin Biology and Diseases Resource-Based Center present:

Development of a B-Cell-Based Vaccine to Treat Glioblastoma

Catalina Lee Chang, PhD
Research Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Refreshments will be provided.

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Oct

05

21st Annual Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium

Off-Campus -

Referred to as the most valuable breast cancer meeting worldwide for the practicing clinician, the Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium provides 3.5 days of formal presentations and interactive case discussions. For over 20 years, this multidisciplinary CME program has been bringing together leading national and international medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists to present, debate, and evaluate cutting-edge technology and approaches in the management of breast cancer.

Progress across all aspects of patient care, including prevention, screening, detection, and survivorship, as well as in the primary treatment modalities of surgery, radiation therapy, endocrine therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and novel biologic therapies are leading to new strategies and therapeutic options. The symposium focuses on the close cooperation required for effective multidisciplinary management of patients with breast cancer.

more

Oct

06

21st Annual Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium

Off-Campus -

Referred to as the most valuable breast cancer meeting worldwide for the practicing clinician, the Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Symposium provides 3.5 days of formal presentations and interactive case discussions. For over 20 years, this multidisciplinary CME program has been bringing together leading national and international medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists to present, debate, and evaluate cutting-edge technology and approaches in the management of breast cancer.

Progress across all aspects of patient care, including prevention, screening, detection, and survivorship, as well as in the primary treatment modalities of surgery, radiation therapy, endocrine therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and novel biologic therapies are leading to new strategies and therapeutic options. The symposium focuses on the close cooperation required for effective multidisciplinary management of patients with breast cancer.

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Oct

07

Eugene M. Silinsky Student-Led Symposium | Forbidden Pharmacology: Illicit Drugs Through a Scientific Lens

Chicago - 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Lunch boxes available | Reception to follow

1:15pm
Richard Miller, PhD
- The Rise and Fall... and Rise of Hallucinogenetic Drugs
Alfred Newton Richards Professor of Pharmacology
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

1:55pm
Harriet de Wit, PhD
- Determinants of Addictive Drug Use: Translational Studies
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience
Professor of Grossman Institute for Neuroscience
Director, Human Behavioral Pharmacology Laboratory
The University of Chicago

2:55pm
Lisa Monteggia, PhD - Mechanism of Rapid Antidepressant Action
Professor of Pharmacology
Barlow Family Director, Vanderbilt Brain Institute
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

3:40pm
Kim Janda
, PhD - Biologics for the Treatment of Drug Addiction and Overdose
Ely R. Callaway, Jr. Professor of Chemistry
Director, Worm Institute For Research & Medicine
The Scripps Research Institute

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Oct

07

Metabolism, Organelles and Membranes (MOM) Program Meeting

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Lurie Cancer Center's Membranes, Organelles and Metabolism (MOM) Program presents:

Molecular Mechanisms of IDH1 Oncogenicity in Glioblastoma
Serena Tomassini-Ghelfi, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
Laboratory of Alexander H. Stegh, PhD
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

NAD+ Drives Clock Nuclear Localization to Counter Circadian Desynchrony in Aging
Daniel Levine
PhD Candidate
Laboratory of Joseph Bass, MD, PhD
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Light refreshments provided.

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Oct

08

Department of Microbiology-Immunology: Robert Hogg, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: How Viral and Cellular RNAs Protect Themselves from Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay

Speaker: Robert Hogg, PhD, NIH

Host: Mojgan Naghavi, PhD

Topic:

The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway performs quality control and regulatory functions in virtually all eukaryotic cells. Best known for detecting and degrading mRNAs containing mutations that cause premature translation termination events, NMD also targets viral and cellular mRNAs with features such as upstream open reading frames and long 3 untranslated regions. Using retroviral RNAs as models, we have identified proteins important for the protection of viral and cellular mRNAs from decay. The mechanisms and functional consequences of NMD evasion will be discussed.

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Oct

09

Cell & Developmental Biology Seminar -- Staying in the PINK1: Novel Neuroprotective Strategies

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Please join the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology in welcoming Charleen T. Chu, MD PhD, Professor of Pathology and A. Julio Martinez Chair of Neuropathology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, for her presentation on "Staying in the PINK1: Novel Neuroprotective Strategies".

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Oct

09

Department of Microbiology-Immunology: Robert M. Brosh, Jr., PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: 'Nucleic Acid Transactions by Helicases are Involved in Fundamentally Important Biological Processes

Speaker: Robert M. Brosh, Jr., PhD, NIH

Senior Investigator & Chief, Section on DNA Helicases

Laboratory of Molecular Gerontology

National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health

Host: Hank Seifert, PhD

Topic:

Genetic mutations in a class of molecular motor proteins known as helicases are linked to a growing number of human disorders, indicating that these enzymes have vitally important roles during replication, DNA repair, recombination and transcription. My research team believes that defining the biochemical and cellular functions of helicases will help us understand molecular defects associated with chromosomal variability. The focus of our group is genetic diseases frequently associated with premature aging, cancer, and/or mitochondrial dysfunction arising from mutations in genes encoding DNA helicases that operate uniquely in pathways of DNA repair and the replication stress response. Topics of interest include the importance of helicases in the replication stress response, cellular homeostasis, immunity and DNA repair.

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Oct

09

TEAM Minisymposium: Immune Regulation and Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

Chicago - 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

A minisymposium sponsored by the Tumor Environment and Metastasis (TEAM) Program of the Lurie Cancer Center:

Introductory Comments
H.G. Munshi, MD
TEAM Program Leader

A Novel Macrophage-Specific Function of NRP2: Implications in Solid Tumors
Kaustubh Datta, PhD
Professor, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Nebraska Medical Center

Mechanisms of Immunotherapy Response and Resistance in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma
Ingunn M. Stromnes, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology
University of Minnesota

Cellular Crosstalk in the Pancreatic Cancer Microenvironment
Marina Pasca di Magliano, PhD
Associate Professor, General Surgery
Associate Professor, Cell and Developmental Biology
Associate Chair of Research, Department of Surgery
University of Michigan

Light refreshments provided.

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Oct

10

Department of Surgery Research Conference

Chicago - 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Research residents, postdocs, staff, and other present their research projects in a bimonthly conference. Any Faculty and Research Staff are welcome to attend and learn.

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Oct

11

Department of Physiology Seminar - George Augustin, Ph.D.

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes George Augustin, Ph.D.

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Oct

11

Cell & Developmental Biology Seminar --Trial in Absentia: Examining Nucleoporin Function through Regulated Degradation

Chicago - 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Please join the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology in welcoming Mary C. Dasso, PhD, Senior Investigator, Section on Cell Cycle Regulation, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda MD, as she discusses "Trial in Absentia: Examining Nucleoporin Function through Regulated Degradation".

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Oct

14

Identification and Therapeutic Targeting of Breast Cancer Metastasis Genes

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Yibin Kang, Ph.D.
Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor of Molecular Biology
Princeton University

Abstract:
Breast cancer remains a significant health concern worldwide. Our previous studies suggested that Metadherin (MTDH) promotes breast cancer initiation, progression, and treatment resistances. However, whether targeting MTDH has therapeutic potential is still elusive. Using inducible Mtdh knockout mouse models we found that MTDH sustains breast cancer progression and metastasis via interacting with SND1, and acute Mtdh loss inhibits breast cancer development. Through high throughput screenings, we obtained a serial of MTDH/SND1 inhibitors. Treatments of the compounds suppress breast tumor growth, metastasis, and sensitize breast cancer to chemotherapy by sensitize cancer cells to stress-induced apoptosis. Our results suggest that targeting MTDH/SND1 complex could have therapeutic potential and compounds that disrupt the interaction may be developed as novel therapeutic agents for breast cancer.

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Oct

15

Department of Microbiology-Immunology: Min Dong, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: TBA

Speaker: Min Dong, PhD, Harvard University

Host: Karla Satchell, PhD

Topic:

TBA

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Oct

17

Cell & Developmental Biology Seminar --Drosophila to Model Nucleolar Stress

Chicago - 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Please join the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology in welcoming Patrick J. DiMario, PhD, Professor, Division of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) and Cellular, Developmental and Integrative Biology (CDIB), College of Life Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, for his presentation: "Drosophila to Model Nucleolar Stress".

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Oct

18

Department of Physiology Seminar - Rafael Fernandez-Chacon, Ph.D.

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Rafael Fernandez-Chacon, Ph.D.

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Oct

21

Brain Tumor Patient and Caregiver Forum

Chicago - 3:00 PM - 7:00 PM

During this complimentary program for brain tumor patients, families and caregivers, our experts will discuss advances in brain tumor treatment, as well as skills and resources for managing the unique challenges that come with a brain tumor diagnosis. This program is sponsored by the Malnati Brain Tumor Institute of the Lurie Cancer Center at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

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Oct

21

CatSper: The Ca2+ Channel in the Sperm Function

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Jean Ju Chung, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Cellular & Molecular Physiology
Yale School of Medicine

Abstract:
To achieve fertilization, sperm must have properly functioning Ca2+ signaling. Ca2+ influx into the flagellum is required for sperm to hyperactivate, an asymmetric flagellar movement necessary for mammalian sperm navigation and egg penetration. Varying pH of luminal fluid along the female reproductive tract is a physiological cue that modulates the sperm motility. CatSper is a sperm-specific, pH-sensitive calcium channel essential for hyperactivated motility and male fertility. Multi-subunit CatSper channel complexes organize linear Ca2+ signaling nanodomains along the sperm tail. Here we report a pH-dependent calcium sensor that enables modulation of CatSper channel and the sperm motility in response to changing conditions along the female reproductive tract.

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Oct

22

Department of Microbiology-Immunology: Jonathan Kipnis, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: Meningeal Lymphatics in CNS Immune Surveillance and in Neuroinflammation

Speaker: Jonathan Kipnis, PhD

Host: Immunology Graduate Students and Postdocs

Topic:

Immune cells and their derived molecules have major impact on brain function. Mice deficient in adaptive immunity have impaired cognitive and social function compared to that of wild-type mice. Importantly, replenishment of the T cell compartment in immune deficient mice restored proper brain function. Despite the robust influence on brain function, T cells are not found within the brain parenchyma, a fact that only adds more mystery into these enigmatic interactions between T cells and the brain. Our results suggest that meningeal space, surrounding the brain, is the site where CNS-associated immune activity takes place. We have recently discovered a presence of meningeal lymphatic vessels that drain CNS molecules and immune cells to the deep cervical lymph nodes. This communication between the CNS and the peripheral immunity is playing a key role in immune surveillance of the CNS and in several neuroinflammatory disorders.

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Oct

23

Study in the UK Information Session with Imperial College London

Evanston - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Discover the benefits of studying in London and the programs of Imperial College London, the only UK university to focus entirely on science, engineering, medicine and business.

An Imperial representative will be providing advice and guidance about UK graduate degrees, funding, and the application process -- find out how you can acquire an international experience which will set you apart!

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Oct

24

Department of Physiology Seminar - Avishek Adhikari, Ph.D.

Chicago - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM

The department of Physiology welcomes Avishek Adhikari, Ph.D.

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Oct

24

Department of Surgery Research Conference

Chicago - 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Research residents, postdocs, staff, and other present their research projects in a bimonthly conference. Any Faculty and Research Staff are welcome to attend and learn.

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Oct

24

Virology Club: Dr. Tom Hope

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

"TBDd"

Dr. Tom Hope. Northwestern University.

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Oct

25

Department of Physiology Seminar - Marc Fuccillo, Ph.D.

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Marc Fuccillo, Ph.D.

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Oct

28

Welcome Reception for Students Interested in Cancer Biology

Chicago - 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The Cancer Biology Cluster directors, J. Julie Kim, PhD and Kathy Green, PhD, and the associate director for Education and Training in the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, John Crispino, PhD, invite all PhD students interested in Cancer Biology to a fall welcome reception. This is a wonderful opportunity to meet current trainees and preceptors, learn about a current trainee s research, and discover training activities available to students from T32 leaders and a student Cancer Biology Cluster leader. Light refreshments will be provided.

Agenda:
3:30 3:35 PM: Welcome
John Crispino, PhD
Robert I. Lurie, MD, and Lora S. Lurie Professor
Professor of Medicine (Hematology and Oncology) and Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Associate Director, Education and Training, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center

3:35 3:50 PM: Introduction to Cancer Biology Track
J. Julie Kim, PhD
Susy Y. Hung Research Professor
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive Science in Medicine)
Director, Cancer Biology Cluster

Invitation to Cancer Research Club
Emma Schuster, Driskill Graduate Program in the Life Sciences (Liu Lab)
Kevin Park, Northwestern Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program (Yu Lab)

3:50 4:05 PM: T32 Training Grant Overview
Kathy Green, PhD
Joseph L. Mayberry, Sr., Professor of Pathology and Toxicology
Professor in Pathology and Dermatology
Associate Director of Basic Sciences, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center
Co-Director, Cancer Biology Cluster

4:05 4:35 PM: Student Presentation
Caleb Stubbs (Satchell Lab)

4:35 5:00 PM: Networking
Light refreshments will be provided.

About the Carcinogenesis T32 Training Program:
The Carcinogenesis Training Program, funded by an Institutional National Research Award (NRSA) from the National Cancer Institute (NCI T32 CA009560), provides comprehensive research training to 9 predoctoral students per year in cancer biology. The program serves as a focus for interdisciplinary interactions among students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty in tumor biology with special strengths in signal transduction, adhesion, motility and angiogenesis, viral carcinogenesis, tumor therapy, translational studies, chemoprevention and a growing program in cancer genetics. Candidates for funding in this Training Program come from the pool of second year graduate students matriculated into either the Driskill Graduate Program (DGP) at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine or the Interdepartmental Biological Sciences Program (IBiS) in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern University. Applications, consisting of a letter of nomination from thesis advisor, student CV, essay describing cancer-relevant project, graduate school performance evaluations and undergraduate academic transcript, are reviewed by the Program's Steering Committee in the fall of the 2nd year. From this pool, students are invited for an interview and selected students are admitted in the fall of the 3rd year. The Program makes every effort to attract students from diverse racial/ethnic, economic and other disadvantaged backgrounds. Graduates of the program go on to pursue outstanding postdoctoral positions, and the majority ultimately obtain positions in cancer research in academia or the commercial sector.

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Oct

28

Pharmacology Seminar: Xin He, Ph.D.

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Xin He, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Human Genetics
University of Chicago

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Oct

29

Department of Microbiology-Immunology: Victor DiRita, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: Physiological Mechanisms Contributing to Fitness of the Foodborne Pathogen Campylobacter jejuni During Chicken Colonization

Speaker: Victor DiRita, PhD, Michigan State University

Host: Hank Seifert, PhD

Topic:

Campylobacter jejuni is the major source of bacterial food poisoning in the United States. Colonizing chickens as a commensal, it enters the food supply through food processing and preparation, and in humans causes severe gastroenteritis and diarrhea. Its ability to thrive in chickens is an interesting problem to explore just for the biological aspects, and is also a target for potential intervention to reduce human exposure. Our research tackles the biological question by identifying and studying mechanisms used to colonize, and recent work focuses on metabolic traits that enable growth in the chicken. We are also exploring ways to reduce colonization loads in chickens by developing anti-Campylobacter therapeutics emerging out of high-throughput screens.

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Nov

01

Department of Physiology Seminar - Myriam Heiman, Ph.D.

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Myriam Heiman, Ph.D.

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Nov

05

Department of Microbiology-Immunology: Jyl Matson, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: Vibrio cholerae Responses to Antimicrobial Peptide Exposure

Speaker: Jyl Matson, PhD, University of Toledo

Host: Karla Satchell, PhD

Topic:

Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of epidemic cholera, encounters a variety of stressful conditions in the human gastrointestinal tract and in the aquatic environment. One of the many stresses that the bacteria encounter in the host is exposure to antimicrobial peptides on mucosal surfaces. Our ongoing studies aim to characterize newly identified proteins and pathways that contribute to bacterial survival in the presence of antimicrobial peptide stress. Related to this work, we have also identified antimicrobial peptides as an inducer of virulence gene expression in V. cholerae. Therefore, we also aim to elucidate the exact mechanism by which this signal is sensed and used to modulate gene expression.

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Nov

08

Cancer Survivorship Symposium

Chicago - 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Strategies to Implement and Disseminate Evidence-Based Cancer Care in Clinics and Communities

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Nov

11

Pharmacology Seminar: Baron Chanda, Ph.D.

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Baron Chanda, Ph.D.
Professor of Neuroscience
University of Wisconsin-Madison

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Nov

12

Departmentof Microbiology-Immunolgy: Mario Feldman,PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: A "Control Freak" Plasmid Governs Type VI Secretion and Virulence in Acinetobacter baumannii

Speaker: Mario Feldman, PhD, Washington University School of Medicine/St. Louis

Host: Alan Hauser, MD, PhD

Topic:

Acinetobacter baumannii (Ab) is a nosocomial pathogen with one of the highest rates of multidrug resistance (MDR). This is partially due to transmissible plasmids. Many Ab strains harbor a constitutively active type VI secretion system (T6SS) that is employed to kill nonkin bacteria. T6SS and plasmid conjugation both involve cell-to-cell contact. Paradoxically, successful conjugation requires the survival of the recipient, which is the target of the T6SS. Thus, an active T6SS in either the donor or the recipient poses a challenge to plasmid conjugation. Here, we show that large conjugative MDR plasmids heavily rely on their distinctive ability to repress the T6SS of their hosts to enable their own dissemination and the conjugation of other plasmids, contributing to the propagation of MDR among Acinetobacter isolates. Furthermore, I wills how that these plasmid confers niche specificity by regulating the expression of multiple chromosomally-encoded virulence factors besides T6SS. Our results demonstrate that plasmids can impact bacterial infections by controlling the expression of chromosomal genes.

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Nov

14

Department of Surgery Research Conference

Chicago - 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Research residents, postdocs, staff, and other present their research projects in a bimonthly conference. Any Faculty and Research Staff are welcome to attend and learn.

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Nov

15

Department of Physiology Seminar - Jesse Goldberg, Ph.D.

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Jesse Goldberg, Ph.D.

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Nov

18

Pharmacology Seminar: Indira M. Raman, Ph.D.

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Indira M. Raman, Ph.D.
Bill and Gayle Cook Professor of Neurobiology
Northwestern University

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Nov

20

"Introduction to Speckle Tracking Echocardiography" Didactic Lecture

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Presented By:

Lauren Nelson, MS, RDCS, FASE
Technical Director, Northwestern University Echocardiography Core Laboratory
Technical Director, T1 Center for Cardiovascular Developmental Therapeutics
Department of Medicine-Cardiology
Northwestern University


Feinberg Cardiovascular & Renal Research Institute

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Nov

22

Department of Physiology Seminar - Peyman Golshani, Ph.D.

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Peyman Golshani, Ph.D.

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Nov

25

Serotonergic Monitoring of Peripheral Inflammation: Clues to an Autism Treatment?

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Randy D. Blakely, Ph.D.
Executive Director of FAU Brain Institute
Professor of Biomedical Science
Florida Atlantic University

Epidemiological, post-mortem and gene network analyses have pointed to changes in inflammatory signaling pathways as a contribution to risk of autism. How such changes lead to alterations in brain development and function remain ill-defined. Previously, we identified an IL-1R activated p38 MAPK signaling pathway as central to the posttranslational control of serotonin signaling via modulation of presynaptic serotonin transporter (SERT) function, consistent with recent findings of significant expression of Il-1Rs by serotonin neurons. The possibility that an IL-1R/p38 MAPK/SERT signaling pathway might have disease relevance became of interest with our identification in subjects with autism of multiple, rare, hyperfunctional SERT coding variants that display constitutive p38 MAPK-dependent activation. With a knock-in mouse expressing the most common of these variants, SERT Ala56, we demonstrated elevated CNS serotonin clearance in vivo, and demonstrate changes in CNS and GI physiology and behavior consistent with constitutive-activation of SERT function. Recently, using brain penetrant, isoform-specific, p38 MAPK inhibitors, as well as conditional, serotonin neuron-specific elimination of p38 MAPK, we have been able to normalize multiple changes in these mice. Together, our studies point to the normal use of an IL-1R/p38 MAPK signaling pathway targeting SERT in serotonin neurons to modulate behavior in response to CNS and/or peripheral innate immune system activation. Inappropriate or excessive activation of this pathway during early life may contribute to one or more facets of autism that may be manipulated through pharmacological p38 MAPK inhibition.

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Nov

28

Department of Surgery Research Conference

Chicago - 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Research residents, postdocs, staff, and other present their research projects in a bimonthly conference. Any Faculty and Research Staff are welcome to attend and learn.

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Dec

02

Pharmacology Seminar: Geoffrey W. Abbott, Ph.D.

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Geoffrey W. Abbott, Ph.D.
Professor of Pharmacology, Physiology and Biophysics
University of California Irvine

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Dec

03

Department of Microbiology-Immunology: Victor Garcia, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: Next Generation Precision Animal Models for Biomedical Research

Speaker: Victor Garcia, PhD

Host: Mojgan Naghavi,phD

Topic:

The applications of current humanized mouse models for biomedical research would be significantly broadened by the inclusion of human non-hematopoietic cell types, the primary targets of most human pathogens, that can present antigen to autologous human immune cells in the full context of HLA. When epithelial, endothelial, mesenchymal and smooth muscle cells are incorporated into humanized BLT mice, emerging and clinically relevant human pathogens such as Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, Zika virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and cytomegalovirus replicate in vivo in these models. Direct inoculation of the model with HCMV induces HCMV-specific human IgM, IgG and T cell responses that can effectively control infection in vivo. These new models can be used to study pathogen replication, pathogenesis, immune reactivity and human therapies in the context of a fully functional human immune system.

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Dec

09

Pharmacology Seminar: Nicole Aceta, Ph.D.

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Nicola Aceto, Ph.D.
SNSF Assistant Professor of Oncology
Cancer Metastasis Laboratory
Department of Biomedicine
University of Basel and University Hospital Basel

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Dec

12

Department of Surgery Research Conference

Chicago - 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM

Research residents, postdocs, staff, and other present their research projects in a bimonthly conference. Any Faculty and Research Staff are welcome to attend and learn.

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Dec

13

Department of Physiology Seminar - Hyunsoo Shawn Je, Ph.D.

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The department of Physiology welcomes Hyunsoo Shawn Je, Ph.D.

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Dec

17

Department of Microbiology-Immunology: Jan Carette, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: Genetic Dissection of Viral Pathogenesis and Host Defense

Speaker: Jan Carette, PhD

Host: Gregory A. Smith PhD

Topic:

Emerging and re-emerging viruses pose a constant threat to human health. Through advanced genetic screens we have identified proteins with critical roles in the replication of medically important viruses from diverse families including Ebola virus, rhinovirus, enterovirus, dengue virus, and hepatitis C virus. In addition, we have discovered a key cellular receptor for the AAV gene therapy vector. We are studying the molecular details on how the viruses have hijacked these host components to facilitate their pathogenesis and are characterizing the roles they play in human biology and infectious disease.

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