Skip to main content
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Center for Translational Pain Research
Skip to main content

News and Announcements

Read the latest news from the Center for Center for Translational Pain Research.

  • 09.17.2018

    Scientists have shown they can predict which chronic pain patients will respond to a placebo pill based on brain anatomy and psychological characteristics.

  • 10.31.2016

    New research from Northwestern Medicine and the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago scientists has identified the brain region responsible for the placebo response to pain.

  • 05.19.2016

    Certain anatomical properties of the brain – not the initial injury – determine most of a patient’s risk of developing chronic pain, according to a new study.

  • 12.21.2015

    A brain region controlling whether we feel happy or sad, as well as addiction, is remodeled by chronic pain, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study, and a new treatment targeting this region may dramatically lessen symptoms.

  • 11.06.2014

    Northwestern Medicine scientists mapped brain circuitry associated with addiction and reward, and found that smoking affects the way the brain relates and responds to pain. The findings could lead to targeted therapies for chronic pain sufferers.

  • 09.18.2013

    In a study published September 16 in the journal Pain, A. Vania Apkarian, PhD, found that abnormalities in brain axons predispose people to chronic back pain after injury.

  • 12.30.2009

    Faculty members at the Feinberg School of Medicine frequently are quoted or featured in national and/or international news stories.

  • 10.30.2009

    Faculty members at the Feinberg School of Medicine frequently are quoted or featured in national and/or international news stories.

  • 03.10.2009

    Chronic Pain Reorganizes the Brain Dr. Marco Martina Studies of people suffering from chronic pain have shown that depression and specific cognitive declines are associated with the condition. In humans, the prefrontal cortex is known to be important in higher-order cognitive and emotional functions, and a subsection, the medial prefrontal cortex, has been correlated with [...]

  • 06.01.2007

    June 4, 2007 Contact: Marla Paul at (312) 503-8928 or atmarla-paul@northwestern.edu Broadcast Media: Tamara Kerrill Field at (847) 491-4888 or attlk@northwestern.edu Old Memory Traces in Brain May Trigger Chronic Pain, as Newly Identified Drug Relieves Suffering CHICAGO—Why do so many people continue to suffer from life-altering, chronic pain long after their injuries have actually healed? [...]

  • 11.01.2004

    November 23, 2004 Chronic Back Pain Shrinks ‘Thinking Parts’ of Brain CHICAGO—Chronic back pain, a condition afflicting many Americans, shrinks the brain by as much as 11 percent—equivalent to the amount of gray matter lost in 10 to 20 years of normal aging, a Northwestern University research study found. Loss in brain density is related [...]

Back to top