Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Basic Science Administration
Skip to main content

Events

Sep

17

5th Annual Narahashi Lecture, Brian K. Kobilka, M.D - "Structural Insights into the Dynamic Process of G Protein Coupled Receptor Activation"

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

The Department of Pharmacology and the Driskill Graduate Program welcome Brian Kobilka, MD, as our lecturer for the 5th Annual Narahashi Lecture and Distinguished Lectures in Life Sciences. Please join us for a reception immediately following the lecture in Ryan Family Atrium. Brian K. Kobilka, M.D.2012 Nobel Prize in ChemistryProfessor, Department of Molecular & Cellular Physiology Helene Irwin Fagan Chair in CardiologyStanford School of Medicine "Structural Insights into the Dynamic Process of G Protein Coupled Receptor Activation" G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) conduct the majority of transmembrane responses to hormones and neurotransmitters, and mediate the senses of sight, smell and taste. The 2 adrenergic receptor (2AR), the M2 muscarinic receptor and the mu-opioid receptor are prototypical Family A GPCRs. We have obtained three-dimensional structures of these receptors in inactive and active conformations, as well as a structure of the 2AR in complex with the G protein Gs. Comparison of these structures provides insights into common mechanisms for propagation of conformational changes from the agonist binding pocket to the G protein coupling interface. Crystal structures of inactive and active states may give the impression that GPCRs behave as simple two-state systems. However, cellular signaling assays reveal that many GPCRs signal through more than one G protein isoform, and through G protein independent pathways. This complex functional behavior provides evidence for the existence of multiple functionally distinct conformational states. We have used fluorescence, EPR and NMR spectroscopy to study the dynamic properties of several GPCRs. I will discuss what we these studies have taught us about allosteric regulation of GPCR structure by G proteins and ligands.

more

Sep

18

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Anne Simon, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "RNA Virus Evasion of Nonsense-Mediated Decay" Anne Simon, PhD - University of Maryland Host Derek Walsh PhD Description: Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) serves a critical role in preserving the integrity of the host transcriptome. RNA transcripts bearing premature termination codons (PTCs) are subject to NMD as they can lead to expression of truncated, deleterious proteins, which is associated with many genetic diseases and cancer. While it is known that long 3’ UTRs promote NMD, many transcripts that naturally contain long 3’ UTRs are protected, but the mechanism(s) involved in this protection are virtually unknown. Natural stop codons in the genomes of multicistronic RNA plant viruses would resemble PTCs and thus these viruses must have developed the means to combat NMD to maintain genome stability. We show that the compact, positive-sense Turnip crinkle virus evades NMD by several mechanisms including having an unstructured region of RNA immediately downstream of the coat protein (CP) termination codon, which may also be used by non-susceptible host mRNAs.

more

Sep

20

BMG Seminar: Gene essentiality and druggable genetic dependencies in KSHV-transformed primary effusion lymphoma - Eva Gottwein, PhD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar Series presents: Eva Gottwein, PhDAssistant Professor of Microbiology-ImmunologyNorthwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine The oncogenic herpesvirus Kaposi’s Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) causes primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), a highly aggressive cancer with few treatment options. I will present recent data from genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 essentiality screens that have revealed the cellular gene essentiality landscape in PEL derived cell lines. Our new work addresses how KSHV may usurp cellular pathways to gain transcriptional control over the essential genes that promote survival and proliferation in PEL. We have finally built on this work to explore the potential utility and mechanisms of action of the immunomodulatory drugs lenalidomide and pomalidomide in PEL.  

more

Sep

20

A Neural Circuitry Substrate for Cognitive Dysfunction in Schizophrenia - David A. Lewis, MD

Chicago - 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

The Center for Autism and Neurodevelopment of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine welcomes you to attend a lecture featuring: David A. Lewis, MDDistinguished Professor of Psychiatry and NeuroscienceThomas Detre Professor of Academic PsychiatryChair, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Pittsburgh Medical Director and Director of ResearchWestern Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMCDeficits in cognitive control, the ability to adjust thoughts or behaviors in order to achieve goals, are now considered to be a core feature of schizophrenia and to be the best predictor of long-term functional outcome. Cognitive control depends on the coordinated activity of a number of brain regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Subjects with schizophrenia exhibit altered activation of the DLPFC, and reduced power of frontal lobe gamma band (~40 Hz) oscillations, when performing tasks that require cognitive control. Gamma oscillations require robust activity in the reciprocal connections between the parvalbumin-containing basket cell class of cortical GABA neurons and neighboring pyramidal neurons. Thus, alterations in either the excitatory or inhibitory synapses in this circuit could contribute to impaired gamma oscillations and cognition in schizophrenia. This presentation will review the evidence for alterations in components of this circuit in the DLPFC of subjects with schizophrenia. Current findings converge on the hypothesis that the primary disturbances are in pyramidal neurons with the changes in parvalbumin neurons representing compensatory responses to maintain excitatory-inhibitory balance in DLPFC networks. In concert, the findings provide both a circuity-based explanation for gamma oscillations impairments and cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia and a possible mechanistic substrate for the emergence of psychosis. Dr. Lewis is a Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, the Thomas Detre Professor of Academic Psychiatry, the Chair of the Department of Psychiatry, and Director of the Translational Neuroscience Program, University of Pittsburgh; and Medical Director and Director of Research, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC. He also serves as Director of an NIMH Conte Center for Translational Mental Health Research, which addresses the mechanisms linking the pathology, pathophysiology, and clinical features of schizophrenia. His clinical interests and research activities focus on the following three areas: 1) the neural circuitry of the prefrontal cortex and related brain regions and the alterations of this circuitry in schizophrenia; 2) the postnatal development of prefrontal cortical circuitry, with special emphasis on maturational events during adolescence; and 3) the influence of cannabis use during adolescence of these neural circuits. Dr. Lewis received his medical degree from Ohio State University, completed residencies in both internal medicine and psychiatry at the University of Iowa, and received his research training at the Research Institute of the Scripps Clinic. His research findings have been published in more than 480 scientific articles. Dr. Lewis serves as Deputy Editor of both The American Journal of Psychiatry and Neurobiology of Disease. Recognition of Dr. Lewis’ research accomplishments has included the Lieber Prize for Schizophrenia Research from NARSAD, the William K. Warren Award from the International Congress of Schizophrenia Research, Stanley Dean Research Award from the American College of Psychiatrists, the American Psychiatric Association’s Research Award, and NIMH Senior Scientist and MERIT Awards. In addition, he has twice received the APIRE/Kempf award for mentorship from the American Psychiatric Association. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and of the Association of American Physicians, and he currently serves on the Scientific Councils for the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation and the Simons Foundation. He previously served as a member of the National Advisory Mental Health Council and as President of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology.

more

Sep

21

The Neurobiology of Temperature Sensing: from Genes to Circuits to Behavior

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Physiology welcomes Dr. Marco Gallio with the department of Neurobiology, Northwestern University, Evanston

more

Sep

21

BMG Journal Club

Chicago - 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The BMG Journal Club will convene every other Friday from 3:30pm to 5:00pm. This is an opportunity for the department to come together and have in-depth discussions about the current literature and the overall implications of new studies, enhancing everyone’s knowledge of the field at large and about each other’s research interests within the department; providing possible opportunities to collaborate as well. This is also an opportunity to practice vital presentation skills in front of a friendly audience. Pizza and soda will be served.

more

Sep

24

SQE Lecture: Molecular Technologies for Transcriptome Engineering - Patrick David Hsu, PhD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Simpson Querrey Center for Epigenetics presents:Patrick David Hsu, PhDLaboratory of Molecular and Cellular BiologySalk Institute for Biological Studies

more

Sep

25

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Pradeep K. Singh, MD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: The "Bacterial Swarm” in Chronic Human Infections Pradeep K. Singh, MD - University of Washington Host: Alan Hauser, MD, PhD Description:   Chronic infections involve long-term interactions between bacteria and their hosts, some lasting for decades. The chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections that afflict people with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic wounds are a prime example. This presentation will highlight recent findings on the evolution of diversity in bacterial populations causing chronic infections and discuss mechanisms and consequences of bacterial diversification in disease. TBA

more

Sep

27

BMG Seminar: Pathway analysis of gene expression reveals cancer vulnerabilities - Josh Stuart, PhD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar Series presents: Josh Stuart, PhDProfessor, Biomolecular Engineering DepartmentBaskin Engineering Endowed ChairAssociate Director, Center for Biomolecular Science and EngineeringUniversity of California at Santa Cruz Sequencing cancer genomes has revealed many shared and private variants. However, the link to treatment options for most patients is still missing. While there are a some variants (e.g. BRAF-V600E) that implicate specific drugs (e.g. vemurafenib), or genomic conditions (e.g. high mutation burden) that implicate therapy (e.g. pembro immunotherapy), most tumors harbor DNA changes with no known significance. A growing list of examples demonstrates gene expression is a powerful indicator of treatment such as HER2 for herceptin treatment, EGFR for cetuximab, and tubulin for chemotherapy alternatives. My talk will focus on how theexpression of genes, and associated genetic pathway activities, can be leveraged to find targetable vulnerabilities. I’ll discuss the results of identifying tumor subtypes from the national and international Pan-Cancer projects. The information reveals the oncogenic processes and cells-of-origin of tumor cells that provide a fine-grained molecular-based classification framework for cancer. In addition, constructing genetic network models for specific tumor types reveals inhibitor combinations for individual patients.

more

Sep

27

Annual Chung Lee Lectureship-Targeting Androgen Receptor Nuclear Localization and Function in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

Chicago - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Zhou Wang, PhD Professor, Departments of Urology, Pathology and Pharmacology University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Pittsburgh, PA

more

Sep

28

Simpson Querrey Center for Epigenetics Forum on Biochemistry, Epigenetics, and Metabolism (BEaM)

Chicago - 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The BEAM Forum is a data group where Simpson Querrey Epigenetics Center members present ongoing work being conducted in the Center. It is a great opportunity to get feedback on your work from colleagues, and to make new connections and foster new collaborations within the Center. The forum is normally held every other Friday from 3:30-5:00 pm throughout the year in Baldwin Auditorium. Two presenters will give ~30 minute talks each week with 10 minutes for discussion and questions. We invite all labs associated with the SQE Center to participate. We welcome presentation from students, techs, postdocs, and PIs. Presenting work-in-progress is always encouraged! Pizza and soda is provided.

more

Oct

01

"Long-term Presynaptic Plasticity: Novel Functions and Mechanisms"

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Pablo Castillo, M.D., Ph.D.Harold and Muriel Block Chair and Professor Department of NeuroscienceAlbert Einstein College of Medicine Abstract: Long-term synaptic plasticity is critical for experience-induced neural adaptations in the brain. The mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity are diverse and can be typically due to postsynaptic receptor modifications, or changes in neurotransmitter release. While most research has focused on postsynaptic forms of plasticity, much less is known about how neural activity regulates neurotransmitter release in a long-term manner. Importantly, increasing evidence indicates that presynaptic plasticity is a potent regulator of circuit output that underlies several forms of learning. In his talk, Dr. Pablo Castillo (Professor of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine) will discuss recent discoveries on major molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying presynaptic plasticity in the rodent hippocampus.

more

Oct

02

Microbiology-Immunology Department: K. Heran Darwin, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: “Cytokinin Signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Functions and Consequences" K. Heran Darwin, PhD - New York University Host: Derek Walsh PhD Description: Tuberculosis (TB) kills about 1.5 million people globally every year, making it the leading causes of death by an infectious agent. My lab is working to understand how Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) persists in animals by characterizing substrates of the Mtb proteasome. We reported the identification of a proteasome substrate called “lonely guy” (Log) that catalyzes the synthesis of cytokinins, which had previously only been characterized as plant hormones. In my talk I will discuss the function of cytokinins in Mtb as well as discuss the consequences of making too many cytokinins, which may provide a new understanding of host-pathogen interactions.  

more

Oct

04

BMG Seminar: Marcelo Nobrega, MD, PhD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar Series presents: Marcelo Nobrega, MD, PhDProfessor, Department of Human GeneticsUniversity of Chicago

more

Oct

05

BMG Journal Club

Chicago - 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The BMG Journal Club will convene every other Friday from 3:30pm to 5:00pm. This is an opportunity for the department to come together and have in-depth discussions about the current literature and the overall implications of new studies, enhancing everyone’s knowledge of the field at large and about each other’s research interests within the department; providing possible opportunities to collaborate as well. This is also an opportunity to practice vital presentation skills in front of a friendly audience. Pizza and soda will be served.

more

Oct

09

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Jae U. Jung, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "Immunopathogenesis of Two Eemerging Arboviruses, Zika Virus and SFST Virus" Jae U. Jung, PhD - University of Southern California Hosts: Eva Gottwein, PhD & Richard Longnecker, PhD Description: The recent global (re)emergence of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) raises considerable public health concern. The re-emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection of pregnant women has been associated with microcephaly and nervous system malformations. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia virus (SFTSV) is an emerging Bunyavirus and has a fatality rate of 10-30% by causing multiple organ failure, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia. Understanding how ZIKV and SFTSV evade host immune system and cause diseases is the main topics of my talk.

more

Oct

11

BMG Seminar: Christian Metallo, PhD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar Series presents: Christian Metallo, PhDAssociate Professor, BioengineeringUniversity of California at San Diego, Jacobs School of Engineering

more

Oct

12

Simpson Querrey Center for Epigenetics Forum on Biochemistry, Epigenetics, and Metabolism (BEaM)

Chicago - 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The BEAM Forum is a data group where Simpson Querrey Epigenetics Center members present ongoing work being conducted in the Center. It is a great opportunity to get feedback on your work from colleagues, and to make new connections and foster new collaborations within the Center. The forum is normally held every other Friday from 3:30-5:00 pm throughout the year in Baldwin Auditorium. Two presenters will give ~30 minute talks each week with 10 minutes for discussion and questions. We invite all labs associated with the SQE Center to participate. We welcome presentation from students, techs, postdocs, and PIs. Presenting work-in-progress is always encouraged! Pizza and soda is provided.

more

Oct

16

SQE Invited Lecture: Epigenetic Drivers in Medulloblastoma - Martine F. Roussel, PhD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Simpson Querrey Center for Epigenetics presents: Martine F. Roussel, PhDEndowed Chair of Molecular OncogenesisCo-leader of the Cancer Biology ProgramSt. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Medulloblastoma (MB), an embryonal cerebellar tumor, comprises four major molecularly, histopathologically and clinically distinct subgroups: Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), Wingless (WNT), Group3 (G3) and Group4 (G4). Compared to other cancers, MBs have a relative paucity of mutations affecting known oncogenes and tumor suppressors (β-CATENIN, PATCHED, SUFU, GLI2, MYC and MYCN) that account for only 20-30% of overall cases. Next generation genome sequencing revealed additional somatically altered genes, many of which play roles in epigenetic regulation and chromatin modification. Remarkably, some tumors have no reported mutations, suggesting that some genes required for oncogenesis might be regulated by epigenetic mechanisms.

more

Oct

16

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Kimberly A. Kline, MPH, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "Mechanisms of Biofilm-Associated Enterococcus faecalis Infections"   Kimberly A. Kline, PhD - Nanyang Technological University, SINGAPORE Host: Hank Seifert, PhD Description: The Gram-positive Enterococci are commensal inhabitants of the gastrointestinal tract, as well as opportunistic nosocomial pathogens associated with endocarditis, urinary tract infections (UTI), and wound infection. Many Enterococcal infections are difficult to treat due to their multi-drug resistance, association with bacterial biofilms, and polymicrobial nature. The goal of our research is to understand the molecular mechanisms by which Enterococcus faecalis interacts with other bacterial species and the host in the context of these polymicrobial, biofilm-associated infections.

more

Oct

18

BMG Seminar: Dylan Taatjes, PhD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar Series presents: Dylan Taatjes, PhDAssociate Professor, Chemistry and BiochemistryUniversity of Colorado, Boulder

more

Oct

18

Center for Autism and Neurodevelopment seminar - Edwin H. Cook Jr., MD

Chicago - 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

The Center for Autism and Neurodevelopment of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine welcomes you to attend a lecture featuring: Edwin H. Cook, Jr., MDEarl M. Bane Professor of PsychiatryDirector, Center for Neurodevelopmental DisordersDirector, Division of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryUniversity of Illinois at Chicago

more

Oct

19

BMG Journal Club

Chicago - 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The BMG Journal Club will convene every other Friday from 3:30pm to 5:00pm. This is an opportunity for the department to come together and have in-depth discussions about the current literature and the overall implications of new studies, enhancing everyone’s knowledge of the field at large and about each other’s research interests within the department; providing possible opportunities to collaborate as well. This is also an opportunity to practice vital presentation skills in front of a friendly audience. Pizza and soda will be served.

more

Oct

23

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Lena Al-Harthi, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "HIV Sanctuary Sites: The Brain/Peripheral Organ Connection Lena Al-Harthi, PhD - Rush University Host: Mojgan Naghavi, PhD Description: Twenty-five years ago, an HIV diagnosis meant a death sentence within 4-6 years. Thankfully, with advances in HV treatment, HIV has become a chronic disease, albeit with considerable co-morbid complications. Nonetheless, scientific efforts are focused on an HIV cure (e.g. eliminating the virus from the body). Those efforts have largely focused on the role of resting memory T cells. Yet, other sanctuary sites for HIV persist that will be a challenge to HIV cure initiatives. HIV enters the brain during acute HIV infection, yet there is an underappreciation for the role of the brain as a reservoir for HIV, largely because it is difficult to probe active virus replication in the brain and also to address how this virus may re-seed the periphery. In this presentation, I will share our body of work regarding the role of the brain, and particularly astrocytes, as an HIV reservoir. Specifically, I will address HIV infection of astrocytes, mechanisms that restrict productive infection, pathways that overcome this restriction, evidence for HIV latency in astrocytes, and HIV dissemination (egress) from the brain (infected astrocytes) to peripheral organs. Further, HIV and its inflammatory sequelae lead to HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), I will discuss the mechanisms driving HAND as they relate to dysregulation in astrocyte function and a novel biomarker for HAND. Our collective studies point to brain as a reservoir for HIV, which cannot be viewed as a separate HIV compartment but rather as a contributing source of HIV dissemination into other tissues and highlight the impact of HIV/inflammatory mediators in disrupting astrocytes function contributing to HAND.   r. Al-Harthi’s research is focused on defining mechanism(s) driving HIV neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and HIV latency in the central nervous system. Specifically, she studies the role of astrocytes in HAND and HIV latency/persistence. To date, her body of work has demonstrated that HIV replication in astrocytes is restricted through robust expression of b-catenin signaling, which blocks HIV transcription. Yet, this restriction is overcome by inflammatory mediators allowing for bursts of productive HIV replication and persistence of HIV in astrocytes. Disruption of b-catenin in astrocytes in turn dysregulates astrocyte function leading to neuronal injury. More recently, she developed an innovative xenotransplantation model of human astrocytes into humanized mice to demonstrate that HIV in astrocytes can re-seed peripheral organs contributing to dissemination of HIV throughout the body.

more

Oct

25

BMG Seminar: TBD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar Series  

more

Oct

25

Microbilogy-Immunology Department: Edward S. Mocarski, PhD

Chicago - 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Title: "Alternative Cell Death Pathways in Antiviral Host Defense" Special Microbiology-Immunology and Virology Club Seminar Edward Mocarski, PhD,  Emory University Host: Richard Longnecker, PhD Description: Herpesviruses and other large DNA viruses elaborate cell death suppressors that reveal how these pathways contribute to host defense. Virus-encoded inhibitors block cell autonomous death pathways in order to sustain infection. Accumulating evidence indicates that programmed cell death pathways in mice, the model mammal, such as caspase-8-mediated apoptosis, caspase-11-dependent pyroptosis, and RIPK3-MLKL-dependent necroptosis all evolved primarily for host defense. Although apoptosis is observed throughout multicellular organisms, pyroptosis and necroptosis are only observed in mammals. Necroptosis is an alternate death pathway that is triggered by caspase-8 compromise and is a potent means of eliminating infected cells. Virus-induced necroptosis depends on the protein kinase activity of RIPK3 to phosphorylate MLKL, a pore-forming protein that executes cell leakage after allosteric activation by binding highly phosphorylated inositol phosphate. Necroptosis is naturally induced by murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) through the Z-nucleic acid binding protein (ZBP)1 (also called DAI and DLM1), a pathogen sensor that recruits and activates RIPK3 via common RIP homotypic interaction motifs (RHIMs). MCMV M45 encodes the viral inhibitor of RIP activation (vIRA), a RHIM-signaling inhibitor that prevents recruitment of RIPK3 during infection of cells and mice. Over the course of the last eight years, human CMV, as well as herpes simplex virus (HSV) and vaccinia virus (VACV) have been shown to inhibit ZBP1-RIPK3-MLKL necroptosis, and influenza has been shown to be naturally susceptible to ZBP1-induced necroptosis and apoptosis. The evidence that virus-induced necroptosis is highly potent derives from work on MCMV and VACV, where viral mutants that fail to block activation of RIPK3 cannot infect mice due to the uniform death of cells at the inoculation site. Thus, necroptosis represents the most potent form of cell autonomous innate host defense to prevent infection and reduce the likelihood of dissemination within the host. HSV1 and HSV2 encode an M45 homolog (RR1, UL39-encoded ICP6) that has been shown to block RHIM signaling and prevent necroptosis in human cells. ICP6 exhibits species specificity and acts to promote necroptosis in mouse cells and in mice by functioning as a RHIM-dependent activator of RIPK3. Recent studies have shown that ICP6 RHIM mutant virus nevertheless retains the ability to induce necroptosis in mice; however, this virus-induced death is dependent on ZBP1 RHIM-dependent recruitment of RIPK3, a pathway strikingly similar to MCMV M45 mutant virus. Thus, HSV1 infection of mouse cells induces necroptosis via two distinct RHIM-dependent mechanisms in mice, one dependent on the ICP6 RHIM-mediated recruitment of RIPK3 and one triggered via the pathogen sensor ZBP1. Like MCMV M45 RHIM mutant virus, ICP6 RHIM mutant HSV1 pathogenesis becomes normalized during infection of Zbp1-/-, Ripk3-/- and Mlkl-/- mice. Importantly, in human HT-29 cells, which are commonly employed for studies on TNF-induced necroptosis (RIPK1-RIPK3-MLKL pathway), lack sufficient ZBP1 to support virus-induced necroptosis. ZBP1-transduced HT-29 cells are susceptible to virus-induced death depending on the Z nucleic acid binding domains, Zalpha1 and Zalpha2. Transcription is necessary for the execution of virus-induced necroptosis, suggesting that, like MCMV, vaccinia and influenza, cell death is initiated by ZBP1 sensing of dsRNA rather than viral DNA, an area that is under active investigation. Thus, virus-induced ZBP1-RIPK3-MLKL necroptosis is likely to be a feature of natural infection in humans but is masked when WT HSV1 is in the non-natural mouse host due to ICP6 RHIM-triggered death.      

more

Oct

26

Simpson Querrey Center for Epigenetics Forum on Biochemistry, Epigenetics, and Metabolism (BEaM)

Chicago - 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The BEAM Forum is a data group where Simpson Querrey Epigenetics Center members present ongoing work being conducted in the Center. It is a great opportunity to get feedback on your work from colleagues, and to make new connections and foster new collaborations within the Center. The forum is normally held every other Friday from 3:30-5:00 pm throughout the year in Baldwin Auditorium. Two presenters will give ~30 minute talks each week with 10 minutes for discussion and questions. We invite all labs associated with the SQE Center to participate. We welcome presentation from students, techs, postdocs, and PIs. Presenting work-in-progress is always encouraged! Pizza and soda is provided.

more

Oct

30

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Hank Seifert, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: “Location, Location, Location: Evolution and Pathogenesis of the Human-Restricted Neisseria” Hank Seifert, PhD - Northwestern University Host: Driskill Graduate Program Description: There are several Neisseria species that live only within humans but only, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis have acquired the ability to cause disease. There are several distinguishing characteristics of the pathogenic Neisseria including several different diversity generation systems and the ability to induce neutrophil inflammation while resisting killing by neutrophils. I will discuss my laboratory’s work on the mechanisms allowing N. gonorrhoeae to promote pilus antigenic variation, evade neutrophil killing, and how the pathogenic species may have evolved from a commensal progenitor.

more

Nov

01

BMG Seminar: Daniel Foltz, PhD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar Series presents: Daniel Foltz, PhDAssociate Professor, Biochemistry and Molecular GeneticsNorthwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

more

Nov

02

BMG Journal Club

Chicago - 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The BMG Journal Club will convene every other Friday from 3:30pm to 5:00pm. This is an opportunity for the department to come together and have in-depth discussions about the current literature and the overall implications of new studies, enhancing everyone’s knowledge of the field at large and about each other’s research interests within the department; providing possible opportunities to collaborate as well. This is also an opportunity to practice vital presentation skills in front of a friendly audience. Pizza and soda will be served.

more

Nov

06

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Billy Tsai, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "Hijacking Host Components to Promote Infection by DNA Tumor Vruses" Billy Tsai, PhD - University of Michigan Host: Gregory A. Smith, PhD Description: Our lab is focused on understanding how viruses hijack host cell factors to cause disease. In particular, we seek to clarify the entry mechanism of DNA tumor viruses including polyomavirus and papillomavirus, as well as RNA viruses belonging to the flavivirus family including Dengue and Zika viruses. Our studies have revealed a rather striking conservation in entry mechanism between these viruses. For instance, we discovered how machineries within the endoplasmic reticulum are exploited by these viruses to promote infection. These findings raise the possibility that there may be a common anti-viral strategy against diseases caused by these viruses.

more

Nov

08

BMG Seminar: Evangelos Kiskinis, PhD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar Series presents: Evangelos Kiskinis, PhDAssistant Professor, Neurology (Neuromuscular Disease) and PhysiologyNorthwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

more

Nov

09

Simpson Querrey Center for Epigenetics Forum on Biochemistry, Epigenetics, and Metabolism (BEaM)

Chicago - 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The BEAM Forum is a data group where Simpson Querrey Epigenetics Center members present ongoing work being conducted in the Center. It is a great opportunity to get feedback on your work from colleagues, and to make new connections and foster new collaborations within the Center. The forum is normally held every other Friday from 3:30-5:00 pm throughout the year in Baldwin Auditorium. Two presenters will give ~30 minute talks each week with 10 minutes for discussion and questions. We invite all labs associated with the SQE Center to participate. We welcome presentation from students, techs, postdocs, and PIs. Presenting work-in-progress is always encouraged! Pizza and soda is provided.

more

Nov

13

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Benjamin Gewurz, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "CRISPR/Cas9 Genetic Analysis of the Epstein-Barr Virus Lifecycle Benjamin Gewurz, PhD Harvard University Hosts: Dr. Eva Gottwein and Richard Longnecker Description:  Epstein-Barr virus is associated with multiple human cancers, including lymphomas of immunosuppressed hosts, Burkitt and Hodgkin lymphoma, nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas. To gain insights into host factors that control key aspects of the EBV lifecycle, we are using CRISPR/Cas9 screens and temporal proteomic maps of viral latent and lytic infection states. This approach is highlighting vulnerabilities that may ultimately be exploited to selectively target EBV-infected cancers. 

more

Nov

15

BMG Seminar: Ernesto Guccione, PhD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar Series presents: Ernesto Guccione, PhDSenior Faculty, Oncological SciencesIcahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai

more

Nov

16

BMG Journal Club

Chicago - 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The BMG Journal Club will convene every other Friday from 3:30pm to 5:00pm. This is an opportunity for the department to come together and have in-depth discussions about the current literature and the overall implications of new studies, enhancing everyone’s knowledge of the field at large and about each other’s research interests within the department; providing possible opportunities to collaborate as well. This is also an opportunity to practice vital presentation skills in front of a friendly audience. Pizza and soda will be served.

more

Nov

20

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Jun Huang, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "T-Cell Recognition and Differentiation" Jun Hung, PHD - University of Chicago Host: Chyung-Ru Wang, PhD Description: Our lab carries out basic research with a focus on molecular mechanisms of T cell recognition, as well as translational research with the objective of developing immunotherapies for cancer and HIV. This seminar will discuss our recent works on pMHC dodecamer technology development, CD28 as the primary target for PD-1-mediated inhibition, and the role of histone methyltransferase EZH2 in Tfh cell differentiation.  

more

Nov

27

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Nels Elde, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "The Evolutionary Potential of Poxviruses" Nels Elde, PhD - University of Utah Host: Virology Graduate Students/ Coordinator Nathan Meade, PhD (Lab of Derek Walsh) Description: We use experimental evolution, genomic analysis, and related approaches to investigate how poxviruses adapt to counteract host immune defenses. The work is revealing an array of recombination-driven processes and mechanisms of adaptation involving horizontal gene transfer. Our studies highlight the unique biology of poxvirus evolution.    

more

Nov

29

BMG Seminar: Josh Rabinowitz, PhD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar Series presents: Josh Rabinowitz, PhDProfessor, Chemistry and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative GenomicsPrinceton University

more

Nov

30

BMG Journal Club

Chicago - 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The BMG Journal Club will convene every other Friday from 3:30pm to 5:00pm. This is an opportunity for the department to come together and have in-depth discussions about the current literature and the overall implications of new studies, enhancing everyone’s knowledge of the field at large and about each other’s research interests within the department; providing possible opportunities to collaborate as well. This is also an opportunity to practice vital presentation skills in front of a friendly audience. Pizza and soda will be served.

more

Dec

04

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Harry Mobley, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "Gene Expression and Growth Rates During Human Infection" Harry Mobley, PhD - University of Michigan Host: Hank Seifert, PhD Description: Our traditional definition of bacterial virulence has been based on in vitro measurements of adherence, iron acquisition, toxin activity, protein secretion, and motility. Now we must consider what metabolic pathways are in play, what transport systems must be active, and, most importantly, which genes are actually being expressed during human infection. Novel techniques including RNA-Seq and Tn-Seq allow us to identify the most highly expressed genes and which genes are essential during actual infections. In addition, methods to measure in vivo growth rates help us understand the kinetics of infection. This leads to a better understanding of how bacterial pathogens outfox our immune defenses.

more

Dec

06

BMG Seminar: Michael Levin, PhD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar Series presents: Michael Levin, PhDProfessor, Vannevar Bush Chair, Department of BiologyDirector, Allen Discovery Center at TuftsTufts University

more

Dec

07

Simpson Querrey Center for Epigenetics Forum on Biochemistry, Epigenetics, and Metabolism (BEaM)

Chicago - 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

The BEAM Forum is a data group where Simpson Querrey Epigenetics Center members present ongoing work being conducted in the Center. It is a great opportunity to get feedback on your work from colleagues, and to make new connections and foster new collaborations within the Center. The forum is normally held every other Friday from 3:30-5:00 pm throughout the year in Baldwin Auditorium. Two presenters will give ~30 minute talks each week with 10 minutes for discussion and questions. We invite all labs associated with the SQE Center to participate. We welcome presentation from students, techs, postdocs, and PIs. Presenting work-in-progress is always encouraged! Pizza and soda is provided.

more

Dec

11

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Andrea Sant, PhD

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "The Contributions of CD4 T Cells to Protective Immunity to Influenza Infection" Andrea Sant, PhD University of Rochester Host: Melissa Brown, PhD Description: Research focus: Our research seeks to understand the elements in vivo that dictate the selective specificities in CD4 T cells during protective immune responses, and the competitive events that shape selective recognition of foreign and pathogenic organisms in vivo. We are particularly interested in the links between the viral antigen specificity and function of CD4 T cells in response to influenza virus infection and vaccination. Most recently, we have begun to explore influenza virus tropism in the lung and the function of influenza specific CD4 T cells that deliver effector function at this site. To address these research topics, our lab utilizes approaches such as novel, recombinant fluorescent reporter viruses, multiparameter flow cytometry, and different animal models of infection and vaccination . We are also developing vaccine candidates to promote the needed effector function to protect the host against influenza virus infection.    

more

Dec

13

BMG Seminar: M. Celeste Simon, PhD

Chicago - 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar Series presents: M. Celeste Simon, PhD Arthur H. Rubenstein, MBBCh Professor, Cell and Developmental BiologyUniversity of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine

more

Dec

18

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Colleen Furey

Chicago - 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Title: "The Role of +TIPs and Microtubule Dynamics in HSV-1 Infection of Neuronal and Non-Neuronal Cell Types" Colleen Furey Graduate Student, Driskill Graduate Program in the Life Sciences (DGP) Lab of Derek Walsh, PhD Northwestern University Description:    

more

Back to top