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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Foundation Relations

Welcome to this non-federal funding opportunities page for biomedical and bioscience research for the Feinberg School of Medicine. Due to the volume of listings, we will list regular opportunities by the month of the deadline. Please click through to get the exact deadline date.

This is a searchable database by career stage and keyword

Career Stage – Please note that if an opportunity is open to more than one category, it will be tagged and found in all eligible career categories. Also, foundations do not consistently consider “early stage” on the same basis. For the purposes of this database, we have listed it with up to six years of experience past postdoc/fellowship. Past that and one should be considered established. Again, if there is a question, we will list an opportunity in both early and established. (For example, if you can have up to ten years experience.)

  • Fellowship Category: Fellowship/post-doc funding opportunities only
  • Early Stage Scientist: up to six years of experience past postdoc/fellowship
  • Established Scientist: more than six years of experience past post-doc/fellowship

Keyword: You’ll be able to search across all listings by any word in any listing.

Our team is in the process of adding funding opportunities to this page every week, so this is not yet a full listing. Please continue to visit this page for more opportunities. Also, if you are in the Feinberg School of Medicine, feel free to contact Michelle Melin-Rogovin for questions about funding opportunities.

Here are some additional websites to search for funding opportunities:

Northwestern University Office of Fellowships - Fellowship Finder

Northwestern University Office of Research Development - Funding Opportunities Powered by Pivot (requires Northwestern NetID login)

Pathways to Science.org (Institute for Broadening Participation)

Duke University - Research Funding Opportunities

UCLA Graduate Programs - Funding Search

The Graduate College at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Fellowship Finder

Johns Hopkins University - Postdoctoral Funding Opportunities

Johns Hopkins University - Early Career Funding Opportunities

Stanford University School of Medicine - Calendar of Funding Opportunities

Search by Type

Fellowship
This award is to support the training of researchers who have received a doctoral degree to provide initial funding leading to an independent career in cancer research (including basic, preclinical, clinical, cancer control, psychosocial, behavioral, epidemiology, health services and health policy research). Awards may be for three years with progressive stipends of $48,000, $50,000, and $52,000 per year, plus a $4,000 per year fellowship allowance (an additional $1,500 is added to the fellowship allowance in the last year to attend the ACS Postdoctoral Fellows Symposium or a domestic scientific meeting). Depending on availability of special endowment funds, the Society annually selects one or more of the top-ranked fellowships to be supplemented above the standard stipend.
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Fellowship
These fellowships are available to postdoctoral researchers (MD, MD/PhD, PhD, DVM, or equivalent) to provide support for high quality training in disciplines and topics relevant to diabetes, in an environment conducive to beginning a career in diabetes research. Awards are between $47,484-$55,581/year for up to 3 years, plus yearly $5,000 training and $5,000 fringe benefit allowances.
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Fellowship
These fellowships are available to minority* postdoctoral researchers (MD, MD/PhD, PhD, DVM, or equivalent) who are underrepresented in biomedical research. Fellowships provide support for high quality training in disciplines and topics relevant to diabetes, in an environment conducive to beginning a career in diabetes research. Awards are between $47,484-$55,581/year for up to 3 years, plus yearly $5,000 training and $5,000 fringe benefit allowances. *Eligible racial/ethnic groups are African American or Black, Hispanic/Spanish/Latino, American Indian/Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander.
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Fellowship
Enhances the integrated research and clinical training of postdoctoral applicants who are not yet independent. The applicant must be embedded in an appropriate research group with the mentorship, support, and relevant scientific guidance of a research supervisor. AHA awards are open to the array of academic and health professionals. This includes but is not limited to all academic disciplines (biology, chemistry, mathematics, technology, physics, etc.) and all health-related professions (physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, dentists, physical and occupational therapists, statisticians, nutritionists, etc.). At the time of award activation, the applicant must hold a post-baccalaureate Ph.D. degree or equivalent, or a doctoral-level clinical degree, such as M.D., D.O., D.V.M., Pharm.D., D.D.S., Dr.Ph, Ph.D. in nursing, public health, or other clinical health science., or equivalent clinical health science doctoral student who seeks research training with a sponsor prior to embarking upon a research career. Awards are for one or two years and awardees may apply for a second two-year award. Maximum of four years of Association postdoctoral fellowship support per individual. Total Award Amount is $63,854 - $150,316.
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Fellowship
The Dr. George C. Cotzias Memorial Fellowship is intended to assist promising young neurologist in establishing careers in research, teaching and patient care relevant to the problems, causes, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson's disease and related neurological movement disorders. One hundred thousand dollars will be awarded each year for salary and supporting research expenses for three consecutive years providing the required conditions are met to the satisfaction of the APDA Scientific Advisory Board, and the APDA Board of Directors. The applicant must be a physician who is licensed to practice medicine in the US and who is completing, or has completed, training in a clinical discipline concerned with disorders of the nervous system (i.e. adult neurology, child neurology, neurosurgery, neuropathology). The applicant should be an instructor or assistant professor and demonstrate a clear commitment to the goal described above. There should also be evidence that the sponsoring institution will provide the environment and support needed for career development. The applicant should be no more than 10 years beyond completion of his/her clinical training at the time of submission and must be sponsored by a non-profit institution in the US or its territories.
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Fellowship
APDA Post-doc fellowships are intended to support post-doctoral trainees at U.S. research institutions whose research training focuses on new insights into the pathophysiology, etiology, and/or treatment of Parkinson's disease. One year fellowship up to a maximum of $50,000 will be awarded to post-doctoral (MD, MD/PhD, or PhD) research trainees. These fellowships are not renewable for a second year of funding. Applicants must have completed their MD, PhD, MD/PhD or clinical residency program within two (2) years of the onset of the proposed award.
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Fellowship
The Beckman Young Investigator (BYI) Program provides research support to the most promising young faculty members in the early stages of their academic careers (within the first three years of a tenure-track position or an equivalent independent research appointment) in the chemical and life sciences, particularly to foster the invention of methods, instruments and materials that will open up new avenues of research in science. Projects are normally funded for a period of four years. Grants are in the range of $600,000 over the term of the project, contingent upon demonstrated progress after the second year of the award. Projects proposed for the BYI program should be truly innovative, high-risk, and show promise for contributing to significant advances in chemistry and the life sciences. They should represent a departure from current research directions rather than an extension or expansion of existing programs. Proposed research that cuts across traditional boundaries of scientific disciplines is encouraged. Proposals that open new avenues of research in chemistry and life sciences by fostering the invention of methods, instruments and materials will be given additional consideration.
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Fellowship
The Career Awards for Medical Scientists (CAMS) is a highly competitive program that provides $700,000 awards over five years for physician-scientists, who are committed to an academic career, to bridge advanced postdoctoral/fellowship training and the early years of faculty service. Proposals must be in the area of basic biomedical, disease-oriented, or translational research. Proposals in health services research or involving large-scale clinical trials are not eligible. BWF anticipates making up to 14 awards including up to two awards to clinically trained psychiatrists who focus their research at the interface between psychiatry and neuroscience. Applicants must hold an M.D., D.D.S., D.V.M., or D.O. degree, must not be more than 13 years past their clinical doctorate degree, and may hold a junior faculty appointment (lecturer, instructor, assistant professor-non-tenure track). Applicants with tenure track appointments are not eligible.
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Fellowship
The Foundation encourages all theoretical and experimental research relevant to the study of cancer and the search for cancer causes, mechanisms, therapies, and prevention. Damon Runyon Postdoctoral Research Fellowships are granted for a four-year term ($231,000 over 4 years) with second-, third- and fourth- year funding contingent upon satisfactory progress reports. Awards are made to institutions for the support of the Fellow under direct supervision of the Sponsor.
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Fellowship
This award provides funding to basic scientists and clinicians who conduct research with the potential to significantly impact the prevention, diagnosis or treatment of one or more pediatric cancers. Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Fellowships are granted for a four-year term ($231,000 over 4 years) with second-, third- and fourth-year funding contingent upon satisfactory progress reports. Awards are made to institutions for the support of the Fellow under direct supervision of the Sponsor.
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Fellowship
The Doris Duke Physician Scientist Fellowship program provides grants to physician scientists at the subspecialty fellowship level who are seeking to conduct additional years of research beyond their subspecialty requirement. The goal is to aid in the transition into a research faculty appointment. The Fellowship consists of $100,000 for annual direct costs plus $10,000 (10 percent) for annual indirect costs for one or two years. The priority of the Physician Scientist Fellowship program is to fund outstanding individuals with excitement for clinical research careers, whose projects will address highly significant research questions and lead to career advancement. DDCF does not have funding priorities for this fellowship based on disease area or research type.
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Fellowship
Postdoctoral Fellowship Awards are designed to support early-career researchers under the mentorship of an independent investigator. These fellowships are awarded to qualified applicants whose proposed projects investigate hypotheses directly related to Dravet syndrome. Proposals are scored according to NIH guidelines based on the quality of preliminary data, research design, feasibility, investigator's qualifications, and overall impact. Grants are awarded for $50,000 (beginning January 1 of each year), intended to support a full-time research effort with salary and benefits (no indirect costs).
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Fellowship
FRAXA Fellowships provide $45,000 per year, renewable for a second year of funding (maximum two years), assuming successful progress, and timely submission of a renewal application. Any scientist is eligible for salary support from these awards (not just postdocs), and a supply budget may be included. Given the flexible nature of the new fellowships, a detailed budget is required. Only one position will be supported per project, and the individual should be working at least time on the project. These are significant changes from our previous Fellowships. It is recommended that potential applicants send a brief Letter of Intent to Michael Tranfaglia, MD (mtranfaglia@fraxa.org) well in advance of a formal application. Priority is given to research with a translational or preclinical focus on fragile X, which has potential to lead to improved treatment.
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Fellowship
The Helen Hay Whitney Foundation supports early postdoctoral research training in all basic biomedical sciences. Candidates who hold, or are in the final stages of obtaining a Ph.D., M.D., or equivalent degree and are seeking beginning postdoctoral training in basic biomedical research are eligible to apply for a fellowship. The Foundation accepts applications from candidates who have no more than one year of postdoctoral research experience at the time of the deadline for submitting the application, and who have received a PhD (or D.Phil. or equivalent) degree no more than two years before the deadline, or an M.D. degree no more than three years before the deadline. Award: $175,500 (Stipend/Research allowance) over three years.
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Fellowship
The goal of the Hanna H. Gray Fellows Program is to recruit and retain individuals from gender, racial, ethnic, and other groups underrepresented in the life sciences, including those individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. Through their successful careers, HHMI Hanna Gray Fellows will become leaders in academic research and inspire future generations of scientists from America's diverse talent pool. Following the people, not projects philosophy of HHMI, the competition is open to those dedicated to basic research from both doctoral and/or medical training paths in the biomedical and life science disciplines, including plant biology, evolutionary biology, biophysics, chemical biology, biomedical engineering, and computational biology. Fellows have freedom to change their research focus and follow their own curiosity for the duration of the award. The program is open to individuals who: are basic science researchers and physician-scientists in the biomedical and life science disciplines; hold a PhD and/or MD (or equivalent), which must be conferred by the start of the grant term; have been accepted to join a laboratory as a postdoctoral researcher at an academic research institution located in the U.S. (including Puerto Rico) at the time of the application due date. The postdoctoral training mentor must hold a tenured or tenure-track position (or equivalent) at an institution in the U.S. (including Puerto Rico) and applicants can have no more than 16 months of postdoctoral research experience at the time of the application due date. During the Postdoctoral Training Phase, fellows will receive annual support of a $70,000 salary for the initial year and a $20,000 expense allowance, paid through a non-renewable grant to the training institution. This phase of the award is for a minimum of two and maximum of four years. During the Faculty Training Phase, fellows will receive $250,000 in research funding and a $20,000 expense allowance per year, paid through a non-renewable grant to the institution where they have attained a faculty position. This phase of the award has a maximum length of four years. Fellows in both postdoctoral training and faculty phases are required to devote at least 75% of their total effort to research. To transition to the faculty phase of the program, fellows must obtain a tenure-track (or equivalent) faculty position at a U.S. (including Puerto Rico) research institution with a doctoral-level graduate program in their area of interest.
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Fellowship
The Jane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund for Medical Research was established for the purpose of supporting research into the causes and treatment of cancer. The Fund has taken a broad approach to the study of cell growth and development, emphasizing the study of the basic biology and chemistry of the underlying processes. The current Fellowship stipend levels are Year 1 - $52,000; Year - 2 $52,500 and Year 3 - $53,000. Postdoctoral applicants should have no more than one year of postdoctoral research experience at the time of the deadline for submitting applications; PhD. degree must not have been conferred more than 18 months prior to the deadline date; and MD. degree should not have been conferred more than three years before deadline date of application.
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Fellowship
Applicants must be a promising investigator with less than 2.5 years of postdoctoral research training. This award encourages you to embark on an academic career involving basic or translational research in hematologic malignancies and/or relevant premalignant conditions under a research sponsor's direction. The proposal must be directly relevant to hematological malignancies and/or relevant pre-malignant conditions. In addition, your Sponsor(s) must be have the appropriate experience to mentor you as you engage in research of direct relevance to blood cancer. The award is for $60,000 per year for three years.
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Fellowship
Applicants for the Special Fellow Award must be a highly qualified postdoctoral fellow or instructor who's completed a minimum of 2.5 years of postdoctoral research training and is in a mentored research position, continuing a research program of direct relevance to hematological malignancies and/or relevant pre-malignant conditions. In addition, your Sponsor(s) must be have the appropriate experience to mentor you as you engage in blood cancer-relevant research. This award provides you with the opportunity to continue building a research program that will make you competitive for an independent position by the end of the award funding period. The award is for $67,000 per year for two or three years.
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Fellowship
The Life Sciences Research Foundation aims to identify and fund exceptional young scientists at a critical juncture of their training in all areas of basic life sciences, and to provide a high-quality peer-review service to anyone wishing to sponsor a fellow who shares their vision of important research. LSRF does not require a budget; a single type of award is offered - a three-year postdoctoral fellowship. The current award amount is $62,000/year ($186,000 total). Of this, $52,000 is allocated for the fellow's salary/stipend and the remaining $10,000 is a research allowance for the fellow's use.
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Fellowship
The Lung Cancer Research Foundation's annual pilot grant program provides funding for research focused on the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure of lung cancer. The goal of the program is to fund innovative projects across the spectrum of basic, translational, and clinical research. We encourage applications for projects investigating a wide variety of topics including Improving our understanding of lung cancer biology; Prevention and screening for early detection; Identification of new biomarkers and the development of targeted therapies; and Development of more effective and safer therapies. Investigators must be affiliated with a non-profit academic or research institution and must fall into one of the following categories: Students and fellows; Young and mid-career investigators with less than ten years experience since initial faculty appointment; Non-tenure track researchers, staff scientists, and clinicians (any number years of experience). The maximum award amount is $150,000 for a period of two years (disbursed at $75,000 per year).
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Fellowship
This award supports individuals engaged in multidisciplinary/collaborative research training programs that will extend their credentials in Translational Medicine and Therapeutics. Eligible candidates will have doctoral degrees, e.g., PhD, D.Sc, D.Eng, MD, and seek to further develop and refine their skills and understanding of TMT through post-doctoral training. A key component of TMT involves collaborative programs that span non-clinical and clinical domains, potentially involving multiple laboratories, advisers, and institutions. All applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. This award is $60,000 per year for up to two years.
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Early Stage Scientist
The "A" Award is a four-year grant designed for the early independent career scientist who wants to establish a career in pediatric oncology research. The ideal applicant has an original project that is not currently being funded. Demonstration of a future commitment to pediatric cancer investigation as well as institutional support for the career development of the investigator are critical components of a successful application. The award is a maximum of $200,000 per year for 4 years, with the possibility of 5th year funding.
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Early Stage Scientist
The purpose of the grant is to fund research in strategies leading to the development of therapies to prevent the transition from pre-leukemia to leukemia for patients with FPD/AML. Projects should focus on leukemia caused by familial RUNX1 mutations rather than sporadic AML with somatic RUNX1 mutations. Two Year Grant Amount: $250,000; up to $125,000 per year may be requested.
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Early Stage Scientist
The Young Investigator grant is a 3-year award designed to support scientists in the early stages of their research careers, such as postdoctoral or clinical fellows. Outstanding mentorship and demonstration of a career plan that shows commitment to pediatric cancer investigation are critical components of a successful application. Applicants must have their M.D., Ph.D. or dual M.D., Ph.D. and must not have achieved an appointment higher than Instructor (Assistant Professor level faculty, including Adjuncts at this level, will not be considered). Applicants from accredited clinical fellowship programs are automatically eligible for the duration of their training and during their first three years at the Instructor level. All other applicants must be within five years from the granting of the last doctoral degree. The award amount is up to $150,000 over three years. A maximum of $50,000 in total costs will be awarded to applicants annually. Budget items may include salary, fringe, travel, supplies and small pieces of equipment (less than $5,000).
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Early Stage Scientist
Each year the Academy recognizes outstanding basic, translational, and clinical research by young dermatology investigators. The purpose of the award is to acknowledge significant research advances in the science and practice of dermatology by those beginning their research careers and who demonstrate the potential to become established, independently-funded investigators in dermatology. Up to two basic/translational researchers and one clinical researcher will be selected. Each recipient will receive a $6,000 prize.
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Early Stage Scientist
The award provides support of $150,000 for three years for a total of $450,000. This award is for junior investigators interested in an academic career in clinical, basic, or translational neurological research. Recipient must be a neurologist and an AAN member. Recipient must be a neurologist and an AAN member interested in an academic career in neurologic research who completed residency between 5-10 years prior to the start date of the Career Development Award.
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Early Stage Scientist
This award will consist of a commitment of $65,000 per year for two years, plus a $10,000 per year stipend to support education and research-related costs for a total of $150,000. This award aims to recognize the importance of good clinical research and to encourage young investigators in clinical studies. Recipient must be an AAN member interested in an academic career in neurological research. For the purpose of this scholarship, research is defined as patient-oriented research conducted with human subjects, or translational research specifically designed to develop treatments or enhance diagnosis of neurologic disease. These areas of research include epidemiologic or behavioral studies, clinical trials, studies of disease mechanisms, the development of new technologies, and health services and outcomes research. Disease-related studies not directly involving humans or human tissue are also encouraged if the primary goal is the development of therapies, diagnostic tests, or other tools to prevent or mitigate neurological diseases.
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Early Stage Scientist
Each award will consist of a commitment of $65,000 per year for two years, plus a $10,000 per year stipend to support education and research-related costs for a total of $150,000. The award aims to recognize the importance of, and encourage young investigators in, good laboratory or preclinical research. Recipient must be an AAN member interested in an academic career in neurological research.
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Early Stage Scientist
This award is a joint effort between the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) and the American Lung Association. The Allergic Respiratory Diseases Research Award is for $75,000 per year, for up to two years. No more than 75% of the requested budget may be used for an awardee's salary and/or fringe benefits and no more than 30% of the total award budget may be used to fund the purchase of permanent equipment. Grant funds may be used for the salary and fringe benefit costs of personnel other than the Applicant. Grants are subjected to annual review, the second year of support is based on demonstrating satisfactory progress, as well as, the availability of funding from both organizations. At the time of application, the applicant must hold a doctoral degree, have a primary faculty appointment in an allergy/immunology division/section of an academic institution, be undertaking a project related to allergic respiratory disease, and have completed training. Applicants must be independent, self-directed researchers. Applicants may be at any level of research experience but priority will be given to applicants below the rank of associate professor who have not received more than one R award.
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Early Stage Scientist
The AACR-MPM Oncology Charitable Foundation Transformative Cancer Research Grants are an exciting new funding initiative to stimulate high-risk, high-reward research from early- to mid-career investigators. This novel grant mechanism is intended to promote and support creative, paradigm-shifting cancer research that might not be funded through conventional channels. It is expected that these grants will catalyze significant scientific discoveries that will advance our understanding of cancer and have a potentially transformative impact on future clinical practice. Applicants must have a doctoral degree (including PhD, MD, MD/PhD, or equivalent) in a related field and not currently be a candidate for a further doctoral degree. At the start of the grant term, applicants must hold an appointment at the rank of assistant or associate professor. The grants provide $400,000 over a two-year period.
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Early Stage Scientist

American Cancer Society - Research Professor Grant

DEADLINE: Letter of Intent Deadline: August 1; Application Deadline: October 15

The American Cancer Society offers a limited number of grants to mid-career investigators who have made seminal contributions in the area of cancer control that have changed the direction of clinical, psychosocial, behavioral, health policy or epidemiologic cancer research. It is expected that these investigators will continue to provide leadership in their research area. Applicants will have attained the rank of full professor. Up to two awards are made annually for a five-year term that can be renewed once. The award of up to $80,000 per year (direct costs only) may be used for salary or research project support.
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Early Stage Scientist
Fosters the development of clinicians as clinician scientists. Clinician scientists are investigators licensed to provide patient care and trained to conduct research. They pursue research questions across the cancer research continuum of relevance to improving health. This grant provides support for protected time to allow junior faculty who see patients to be mentored and participate in research training to aid their development as independent clinician scientists. Applicants must be full-time and within the first six years of their initial faculty appointment. Awards range from three to five years and for up to $135,000 per year (direct costs), plus 8% allowable indirect costs. A maximum of $10,000 per year for the mentor(s) (regardless of the number of mentors) is included in the $135,000.
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Early Stage Scientist
Awarded to institutions as block grants to provide seed money for newly independent investigators to initiate research projects. Grants are made for one to three years and average $120,000 per year. These grants are renewable.
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Early Stage Scientist
Awards to institutions to support physician training in accredited preventive medicine residency programs that provide cancer prevention and control research and practice opportunities. Awards are for four and one-half years in the total amount of $300,000, based on an average of $50,000 per resident training year. These grants are renewable.
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Early Stage Scientist

American Cancer Society - Research Scholar Grant

DEADLINE: April 1 and October 15

The Research Scholar Grant supports investigator-initiated projects across the cancer research continuum. Independent investigators in the first 6 years of an independent research career or faculty appointment are eligible to apply. Eligibility is extended for 8 years for clinician scientists who remain active in clinical care. Awards are for up to 4 years, for up to $165,000 a year for direct costs, plus 20% allowable indirect costs.
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Early Stage Scientist
These awards support basic research with novel and innovative hypotheses in any area relevant to the etiology or pathophysiology of diabetes and its complications that holds significant promise for advancing the prevention, cure or treatment of diabetes. Applications proposing high-risk projects with the potential for high-impact results are encouraged, as are studies that may not be sufficiently developed for traditional funding sources. Any level of faculty authorized to work in the United States is eligible to apply. Awards provide up to $115,000 per year for up to three years, including indirect costs.
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Early Stage Scientist
These awards support research with novel and innovative hypotheses, performed in human subjects, or research approaches to accelerate the transition of scientific discoveries into clinical application. Studies supported with these awards must directly involve human subjects, human samples, and/or data, and offer considerable promise for advancing the cure, prevention, or treatment of diabetes. Applications proposing high-risk projects with the potential for high-impact results are encouraged, as are studies that may not be sufficiently developed for traditional funding sources. Any level of faculty authorized to work in the United States is eligible to apply. Awards provide up to $200,000 per year for up to three years, including indirect costs.
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Early Stage Scientist
These awards support early investigators as they establish independence as diabetes researchers. Applicants must be full-time independent faculty up to including Assistant Professor or equivalent with less than 10 years of research experience since their terminal degree who do not have previous or current NIH support (R00, R01, U01 or equivalent). Awards are up to $138,000 per year for up to four years including indirect costs. Additionally, applicants can request up to $10,000 per year towards the repayment of the principal on loans for a doctoral degree (MD, PhD, PharmD, DPM or DO).
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Early Stage Scientist
These awards support early investigators as they establish independence as diabetes researchers. Eligible applicants must be full-time independent faculty up to including Assistant Professor or equivalent from racial/ethnic groups that are underrepresented in biomedical research*, with less than 10 years of research experience since their terminal degree who do not have previous or current NIH support (R00, R01, U01 or equivalent). Awards are up to $138,000 per year for up to four years including indirect costs. Additionally, applicants can request up to $10,000 per year towards the repayment of the principal on loans for a doctoral degree (MD, PhD, PharmD, DPM or DO). *Eligible racial/ethnic groups are African American or Black, Hispanic/Spanish/Latino, American Indian/Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander.
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Early Stage Scientist
Supports highly promising healthcare and academic professionals, in the early years of one's first professional appointment, to explore innovative questions or pilot studies that will provide preliminary data and training necessary to assure the applicant's future success as a research scientist in the field of cardiovascular and stroke research. The award will develop the research skills to support and greatly enhance the awardee's chances to obtain and retain a high quality cardiovascular and/or stroke career position. Research broadly related to cardiovascular function and disease and stroke, or to related clinical, translational, behavioral, population or basic science, bioengineering or biotechnology, and public health problems, including multidisciplinary efforts. This award is for $77,000 per year, including 10% institutional indirect costs, for a total of $231,000.
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Early Stage Scientist

American Heart Association - Collaborative Sciences Award

DEADLINE: LOI Deadline: October 8; Application Deadline: January 30

To foster innovative, new collaborative approaches to research projects which propose novel pairings of investigators from at least two broadly disparate disciplines. The proposal must focus on the collaborative relationship, such that the scientific objectives could not be achieved without the efforts of at least two co- principal investigators and their respective disciplines. The combination and integration of studies may be inclusive of basic, clinical, population and/or translational research. Applications by existing collaborators are permitted, provided that the proposal is for a new idea or new approach that has not been funded before. Projects must include at least one Co-PI from a field outside cardiovascular disease and stroke. This award is also intended to foster collaboration between established and early- or mid-career investigators. Awards are for a three-year period, $250,000 annually for a total of $750,000.
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Early Stage Scientist
The Innovative Project Award supports highly innovative, high-impact research that could ultimately lead to critical discoveries or major advancements that will accelerate the field of cardiovascular or stroke research. Research deemed innovative that may introduce a new paradigm, challenge current paradigms, look at existing problems from new perspectives, or exhibit other uniquely creative qualities is desired. The Innovative Project Award promotes unexplored ideas; therefore, preliminary data is not accepted as part of the proposal, however, a solid rationale for the work must be provided. The candidate must hold a post-baccalaureate Ph.D. degree or equivalent, or a doctoral-level clinical degree, such as M.D., D.O., D.V.M., Pharm.D., or Ph.D. in nursing, public health, or other clinical health science. This program places no limit on eligibility based on career stage, academic rank or discipline. The award is for two years, $100,000 per year, including 10 percent indirect costs, for a total award of $200,000.
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Early Stage Scientist
This award supports highly innovative, high-impact projects that build on work in progress that could ultimately lead to critical discoveries or major advancements that will accelerate the field of cardiovascular and stroke research. Clinical, translational, population, and basic scientists are encouraged to apply. The extent to which the focus of the project is related to CVD and/or stroke is an important factor that will be considered. The candidate must hold a post-baccalaureate Ph.D. degree or equivalent, or a doctoral-level clinical degree, such as M.D., D.O., D.V.M., Pharm.D., or Ph.D. in nursing, public health, or other clinical health science. This program places no limit on eligibility based on career stage, academic rank or discipline. The award is $100,000 per year for 3 years ($300,000 total), including 10 percent indirect costs.
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Early Stage Scientist
This award is a joint effort between the American Lung Association and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI). The Allergic Respiratory Diseases Research Award is for $75,000 per year, for up to two years. No more than 75% of the requested budget may be used for an awardee's salary and/or fringe benefits and no more than 30% of the total award budget may be used to fund the purchase of permanent equipment. Grant funds may be used for the salary and fringe benefit costs of personnel other than the Applicant. Grants are subjected to annual review, the second year of support is based on demonstrating satisfactory progress, as well as, the availability of funding from both organizations. At the time of application, the applicant must hold a doctoral degree, have a primary faculty appointment in an allergy/immunology division/section of an academic institution, be undertaking a project related to allergic respiratory disease, and have completed training. Applicants must be independent, self-directed researchers. Applicants may be at any level of research experience but priority will be given to applicants below the rank of associate professor who have not received more than one R award.
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Early Stage Scientist
The American Lung Association Catalyst Award is a mentored award meant to support outstanding investigators on the path to independence for research into the mechanisms of lung disease and general lung biology. Preference is given to projects that are novel; innovative in design/approach; utilize modern technologies; and incorporate a multidisciplinary collaborative training plan. The Catalyst Grant is for $50,000 per year, for up to two years. Grants are subject to annual review; the second year of support is based upon demonstration of satisfactory progress. Successful applicants are early career faculty, on-track to pursue a career in lung health research with a mentor who has a demonstrated history of lung disease research and mentorship. At the time of application, the applicant must hold a doctoral degree and have a faculty appointment or equivalent with demonstrated institutional commitment (salary support, research space) in a recognized academic or other not-for-profit institution. This award is intended to support investigators prior to receipt of career-development awards, like K08, K23, K99 or similar career-development award. Fellows and PhD post-docs are eligible to apply only if their Department Chair can assure a promotion to faculty status by the start of the award. MD applicants must have completed two years of post-doctoral research training by the start of the award.
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Early Stage Scientist
The American Lung Association Dalsemer Research Grant is a mentored award meant to provide seed monies to junior investigators on the path to independence for researching the mechanisms and biology of interstitial lung disease. The Dalsemer Research Grant is for $50,000 per year, for up to two years. Grants are subjected to annual review and may be granted for two years. The second year of support is based on demonstrating satisfactory progress, as well as, the availability of funding from the Lung Association. Applicants should be on-track to pursue a career in lung heath research with a mentor who has a demonstrated history of lung disease research and mentorship. No more than 75% of the requested budget may be used for an awardee's salary and/or fringe benefits and no more than 30% of the total award budget may be used to fund the purchase of permanent equipment. Grant funds may be used for the salary and fringe benefit costs of personnel other than the applicant.
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Early Stage Scientist

American Lung Association - Lung Cancer Discovery Award

DEADLINE: LOI Deadline: October 3; Application Deadline: January 23

The Lung Cancer Discovery Award is for highly meritorious research projects with the potential to: significantly improve and transform diagnostic and therapeutic paradigms; foster innovation, use novel approaches; and/or accelerate progress in lung cancer research that improves patient care and helps save lives. This award is $100,000 per year for up to two years. The objective of the award is to support independent investigators conducting clinical, laboratory, epidemiological or any groundbreaking project aimed at revolutionizing our current understanding of lung cancer and improving diagnostic, clinical and treatment methods. At the time of application, an applicant must hold a doctoral degree, have a faculty appointment at an academic institution (including research institutions not formally associated with a university), and have completed a training fellowship. Applicants may be at any level of research experience and must be independent, self-directed researchers.
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Early Stage Scientist
The Innovation Award is for $75,000 per year, for up to two years. The award is intended to support highly promising investigators with stellar track records of accomplishment, who have the potential to advance the field of lung disease science. Successful applicants are investigators with evidence of prior excellence and productivity in the early stages of their careers; applicants must have held a K or R type award within three years prior to applying for this Lung Association award. Grants are subject to annual review and may be granted for up to two years. The second year of support is contingent on demonstration of satisfactory progress, as well as, the availability of funding from the Lung Association. Applicants must hold a doctoral degree and have a faculty appointment or equivalent with demonstrated institutional commitment (salary support, research space) in a recognized academic or other not-for-profit research institution. The applicant's publication record should reflect significant scientific contributions.
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Early Stage Scientist
The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (and its charitable arm, The Thoracic Surgery Foundation) is collaborating with the American Lung Association to establish the American Lung Association/TSF Lung Cancer Research Award. This award will provide support to investigators conducting research related to lung cancer. Applications that aim to advance medical and scientific research with measureable outcomes, to reduce the burden of lung disease will be sought. This grant is for cardiothoracic surgeons, pulmonologists, or research or physician scientists who are seeking initial support and recognition for their original research project (see American Lung Association website for specific eligibility requirements). Awards of up to $40,000 per year for up to two years are granted to support the work of early-career cardiothoracic surgeons, pulmonologists, or research scientists. The awarded funds must be used solely for the direct expenses related to the proposed research project, including salary, services, and supplies. Preference will be given to either clinical- or laboratory-based investigations that are judged likely to generate data that will, in turn, facilitate subsequent funding support for the applicant. In making the awards, emphasis will be placed on originality; clear, concise presentation of a logical project; high probability of successful project completion; and importance of the work toward the advancement of cardiothoracic surgery related to lung cancer treatment.
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Early Stage Scientist
The American Lung Association Public Policy Research Award is intended to support research on and evaluation of existing public policy and programs, as well as pilot and demonstration projects that inject innovative ideas and provide evidence for the development of new public policies impacting lung health. This grant is not intended to support events, lobbying efforts, legislative meetings or briefings. The Public Policy Research Award is for a maximum of $50,000 per year for up to two years. Grants are subject to annual review, the second year of support is based on demonstrating satisfactory progress, as well as, the availability of funding from the Lung Association. Applications must include plans for public dissemination of the work which should include information on how to use findings to support and promote important policy changes. At the time of application, the applicant must hold a doctoral degree or relevant terminal professional degree such as an MPH and have a faculty appointment or equivalent with demonstrated institutional commitment (salary support, research space) in a recognized academic institution or established not for profit research entity. Applicants should be on-track to pursue a career in public policy research.
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Early Stage Scientist
The American Parkinson Disease Association will award a one-year grant to study the health disparities and/or biological differences among under-represented PD communities. One year grant up to a maximum of $75,000 will be awarded to a research scientist (MD, MD/PhD, or PhD). A recent APDA conference presented the existing data concerning PD in diverse populations, reported successes in this area from other disciplines and highlighted the experience of PD patients from various racial and ethnic groups. It also allowed for active discussion of the unanswered questions in the field. Current research has established the following: diagnosis of PD among some under-represented communities is delayed as compared to Caucasian patients; some under-represented communities are less likely to receive quality PD care; clinical trial enrollment among certain under-represented communities is lower than in Caucasian patients; biologic differences (clinical features, response to treatment, co-morbidities, prevalence, natural history, genetics, biomarkers) between racial or ethnic communities have not been fully explored. Projects should address one of these four issues. Projects can be designed to detect disparities or differences, understand the reasons for the disparities or differences, or test an intervention to improve disparities.
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Early Stage Scientist
American Parkinson's Disease Association Research Grants are intended to support basic or applied research aimed at reducing the burden of Parkinson's disease. The APDA seeks to promote the entry of new investigators in to the field of Parkinson research, as well as to support important new ideas in the field worthy of investigation. One year grants up to a maximum of $75,000 will be awarded to research scientists (MD, MD/PhD, or PhD). The same investigator can reapply the following year to be considered for a second consecutive year of funding. When submitting applications for a grant on the same subject for the second consecutive year, the applicant will also submit a report of the results obtained during the prior APDA funding years. All research scientists in the field of Parkinson's research can apply, but the selection committee will more favorably consider researchers who are new to the field of Parkinson's disease.
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Early Stage Scientist
B*CURED's primary goal is to fund innovative brain cancer research to end brain cancer. Clinical doctors and research scientists whose primary focus is brain cancer should apply. Clinical and translational projects with significant clinical promise will be considered. Both adult and pediatric brain cancer projects will be considered. Applicants can request up to $50,000 for a 12-month grant. Applicants must be faculty at a research institution in North America who are undertaking clinical or translational research, with the intention of applying for R01 NIH funding or the equivalent within 5 years; or undertaking innovative research to bridge from bench to animal research or to acquire preclinical data from animal models.
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Early Stage Scientist
The Career Awards for Medical Scientists (CAMS) is a highly competitive program that provides $700,000 awards over five years for physician-scientists, who are committed to an academic career, to bridge advanced postdoctoral/fellowship training and the early years of faculty service. Proposals must be in the area of basic biomedical, disease-oriented, or translational research. Proposals in health services research or involving large-scale clinical trials are not eligible. BWF anticipates making up to 14 awards including up to two awards to clinically trained psychiatrists who focus their research at the interface between psychiatry and neuroscience. Applicants must hold an M.D., D.D.S., D.V.M., or D.O. degree, must not be more than 13 years past their clinical doctorate degree, and may hold a junior faculty appointment (lecturer, instructor, assistant professor-non-tenure track). Applicants with tenure track appointments are not eligible.
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Early Stage Scientist
Each applicant must be nominated by their institution. Applications will only be accepted from institutions that have been invited to submit them by the Foundation. The Award supports independent young physician-scientists conducting disease-oriented research that demonstrates a high level of innovation and creativity. The goal is to support the best young physician-scientists doing work aimed at improving the practice of cancer medicine. The $600,000 award will be for a period of three years. Funding in the amount of $200,000 will be allocated to the awardee's institution each year for the support of the Clinical Investigator. Funds are intended to be flexible and can be used for a variety of scientific needs including the Investigator's stipend and/or fringe benefits (up to $130,000 annually), salaries for professional and technical personnel, special equipment, supplies, and other miscellaneous items required to conduct the proposed research.
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Early Stage Scientist
The Innovation Award is designed to provide support for the next generation of exceptionally creative thinkers with "high-risk/high-reward" ideas that have the potential to significantly impact our understanding of and/or approaches to the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of cancer. The Innovation Award is specifically designed to provide funding to extraordinary early career researchers who have an innovative new idea but lack sufficient preliminary data to obtain traditional funding. It is not designed to fund incremental advances. The research supported by the award must be novel, exceptionally creative and, if successful, have the strong potential for high impact in the cancer field. The Stage 1 award is for two years, $200,000 per year ($400,000 total) with the opportunity for up to two additional years of Stage 2 funding (up to four years total for $800,000).
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Early Stage Scientist
The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation wishes to encourage more physicians to pursue research careers and has established a program designed to recruit outstanding U.S. Specialty Board eligible physicians into cancer research careers by providing them with the opportunity for a protected research training experience under the mentorship of a highly qualified and gifted mentor after they have completed all of their clinical training. This award will provide a funding source that will enable these individuals to pursue research intensively (at least 80% effort) for up to four years, while, if they wish to maintain their clinical skills, continuing to be clinically active (no more than 20% effort). The award is $460,000 over a period of four years. Funding will be allocated to the awardee's institution each year for the support of the scientist. Funds are to be used for stipend and/or research expenses.
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Early Stage Scientist

Doris Duke Charitable Foundation - Clinical Scientist Development Award

DEADLINE: Anticipated Deadline for Pre-Proposals: Mid-November

The Doris Duke Clinical Scientist Development Award provides grants to early-career physician scientists to facilitate their transition to independent clinical research careers. The Award consists of $150,000 annual direct costs for three years (total $450,000 total). The priority of the CSDA program is to fund outstanding individuals with potential for clinical research careers, whose projects will address highly significant research questions and lead to career advancement. DDCF does not have funding priorities based on disease area or research type. After submitting a pre-proposal, the Foundation determines who to invite to submit a full proposal.
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Early Stage Scientist
Clinician-Researcher Awards support hypothesis-driven clinical research projects that have significant potential to advance our understanding of Dravet syndrome; slow or halt the of progression of the disease, characteristics, or comorbidities of the disease; and/or reduce mortality. The projects must be patient-oriented, with the investigator directly interacting with human subjects/patients. This includes studies such as therapeutic interventions or support/extension of existing clinical trials. Award funds of $150,000 for two years ($75,000 per year) are made to the affiliated institution in four payments, the second of which is dependent on IRB approval if not required for the first portion of the funding period.
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Early Stage Scientist
The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) is seeking creative and innovative scientists to join its Investigator Program. Through this competition, HHMI will expand our community of basic researchers and physician scientists across the nation who catalyze discovery research in basic and biomedical sciences, plant biology, evolutionary biology, biophysics, chemical biology, biomedical engineering, and computational biology. Approximately 20 new Investigators will be selected in this competition. The Investigator Program is open to individuals who: hold a PhD and/or MD (or the equivalent); have a tenured or tenure-track position as an assistant professor or higher academic rank (or the equivalent) at an eligible US institution (federal government employees are not eligible); have more than five but no more than 15 years of post-training, professional experience; are the principal investigator on one or more active, national, peer-reviewed research grants with an initial duration of at least three years (mentored awards and training grants do not qualify; multi-investigator grants may qualify). Some important conditions of the HHMI Investigator appointment: although they retain academic appointments at their respective institutions, Investigators must become full-time employees of HHMI, which provides full salary and benefits; investigators are appointed for a seven-year, renewable period; investigators are required to devote at least 75% of their professional activities to the direct conduct of research; applicants with administrative responsibilities or other duties inconsistent with this time commitment may apply but must reduce those other commitments prior to their appointment. HHMI pays the full salary of the Investigator and offers a comprehensive benefits package to Investigators and other eligible employees. Once semifinalists are identified, they will be provided with a current description of HHMI benefits for planning purposes.
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Early Stage Scientist

A Kids’ Brain Tumor Cure Foundation - Research Grant

DEADLINE: Open now – LOI’s are submitted throughout the entire year

The number one priority of A Kids' Brain Tumor Cure Foundation is to act as a catalyst for researchers world-wide to turn their attention to the area of pediatric low grade glioma brain tumor research and to award research grants for the most promising programs and studies. Proposals related to basic and translational projects that can advance understanding of the underlying biology of the development and treatment of PLGA tumors will be considered. Investigators in the early years of their careers are encouraged to apply. Funding ranges from $100,000 to $500,000 depending on the project scope and duration.
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Early Stage Scientist
The Klingenstein-Simons Fellowship Awards in Neuroscience supports, in the early stages of their careers, young investigators engaged in basic or clinical research that may lead to a better understanding of neurological and psychiatric disorders. To qualify for an award, investigators must hold the Ph.D. and/or M.D. degrees, and have completed all research training, including post-doctoral training. Candidates must have a tenure track appointment or equivalent. The candidate must be an independent investigator at a university, medical center or research institute and be within 4 years of completing postdoctoral training and the start of his/her tenure track or equivalent appointment. The award of $225,000 is payable over a three-year period beginning July 1. It may be used for salary support, research assistants, equipment, or for any other purpose that promotes the scientific activities.
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Early Stage Scientist
The Scholar award supports talented blood cancer researchers in the early phase of their careers. You must be a highly qualified investigator who has shown a capacity for independent, sustained, original investigation in the field of hematologic malignancies. You should hold an independent faculty-level position and should have obtained substantial support for your research from a national agency. The funding amount is $120,000 per year. Applicants can apply for $600,000 total for the five-year award (inclusive of indirect costs). Applicants must have started their first independent position no less than two years but no more than 8 years before the time of review.
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Early Stage Scientist
Scholar in Clinical Research Award applicants must be highly qualified investigators who hold an independent faculty-level appointment and who are conducting original, independent applied research, often involving early-stage clinical trials that will advance the prevention, diagnosis or treatment of hematologic malignancies. The research should be related to their clinical activities, and must involve patients. Scholar in Clinical Research applicants must: have a Sponsor who will attest to institutional support such as a department head, chief of service, or program chair for the applicant; be an independent investigator of at least an Assistant Professor position or equivalent including any permanent, independent clinical faculty who are not on a laboratory-based, tenure-track career path; have clinical training in blood cancer; have adequate funding to support the proposed research; have started their first independent position within 10 years of the time of review; have protected time for research after the funding start date in the range of 20-40% (if an investigator is more laboratory-based than clinic-based, they cannot apply for this award and should consider the Scholar award); be performing clinical research involving patients (generally clinical trials), which is related to their clinical duties. The award is $125,000 per year for five years ($625,000 total).
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Early Stage Scientist
The Lung Cancer Research Foundation and Pfizer Global Medical Grants are collaborating to offer a new research grant opportunity focused on understanding ways to improve clinical practices for side effect management for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving targeted therapies. Proposals on a variety of topics including the following are encouraged: Patterns of real-world versus pre-approval patient side-effect experiences; Defining and understanding tolerability (including late toxicities and patient reported outcomes); Role of diverse, multi-disciplinary teams (including pharmacists, dieticians, caregivers, etc.) and coordination of care in managing and monitoring therapy; Real-time symptom monitoring; and Implementation science approaches to improving care delivery. Pfizer and LCRF will support up to three innovative health services research projects focused on the improved management of treatment toxicities from targeted therapies in NSCLC patients. Specifically, up to $350,000 will be provided over a period of two years.
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Early Stage Scientist
The Lung Cancer Research Foundation's annual pilot grant program provides funding for research focused on the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure of lung cancer. The goal of the program is to fund innovative projects across the spectrum of basic, translational, and clinical research. We encourage applications for projects investigating a wide variety of topics including Improving our understanding of lung cancer biology; Prevention and screening for early detection; Identification of new biomarkers and the development of targeted therapies; and Development of more effective and safer therapies. Investigators must be affiliated with a non-profit academic or research institution and must fall into one of the following categories: Students and fellows; Young and mid-career investigators with less than ten years experience since initial faculty appointment; Non-tenure track researchers, staff scientists, and clinicians (any number years of experience). The maximum award amount is $150,000 for a period of two years (disbursed at $75,000 per year).
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Early Stage Scientist
The McKnight Scholar Award program gives promising young investigators in the early stages of an independent research career the opportunity to develop their work on critical problems in brain science. The intent of the program is to support the commitment by young scientists to a research career that will have an important influence on the study of the brain. Applicants for the McKnight Scholar Awards must demonstrate their ability to solve significant problems in neuroscience, which may include the translation of basic research to clinical practice. Applicants must have: an MD, PhD, or other suitable doctorate; a record of meritorious research; evidence of a commitment to a career in neuroscience; full-time appointment at the rank of assistant professor; and must have served at that rank for less than four years at the application deadline. Each year, up to six scholars are selected to receive three years support. Currently, awards are $75,000 per year. Funds may be used in any way that will facilitate development of the Scholars research program, but not for indirect costs.
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Early Stage Scientist
NBF awards grants for investigator-initiated original research in all aspects of blood banking, transfusion medicine, cellular therapies and patient blood management. Research content areas eligible for the grant program include Immunology, Hematology, Immunohematology, Infectious Diseases, Cellular Therapies, and Patient Blood Management. The grant maximum award of $75,000 must be used exclusively for research. An applicant must be a doctor (MD or PhD), medical technologist, transfusion medicine or cellular therapies professional. An early-stage investigator is a new investigator who has completed a terminal research degree or medical residency whichever date is later within the past 10 years of the grant application deadline and has not yet been awarded a substantial research grant (i.e. NIH R01).
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Early Stage Scientist
These awards go to researchers doing work in the field of multiple myeloma and related disorders including smoldering myeloma, MGUS (monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance) as well as immunoglobulin derived amyloidosis. The qualifications for a candidate for the Brian D. Novis Junior Research Award include: completed postdoctoral studies or clinical fellowships no later than August 1 of the application year; ability to devote a minimum of 50% of his or her time to the research project during the Award year; ability to provide a completed application with evidence of a meritorious research project. The awards are $50,000 for one year.
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Early Stage Scientist

Parkinson's Foundation - Stanley Fahn Junior Faculty Award

DEADLINE: Anticipated LOI Deadline: Mid-November

The award acts as a bridge to ensure promising early career scientists stay in the Parkinson's research field, helping us solve, treat and end the disease. In conjunction with their institution's commitment, the award gives junior investigators the support they need to develop their own independent funding source (such as an NIH R01 award) and stay in the PD research field. Each award provides $300,000 in total costs. The award funds for three years -- subject to annual progress reviews.
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Early Stage Scientist
The grant provides funding of $100,000 for one year. The aim of these grants is to assist individuals beginning independent research careers in health outcomes at the faculty level. Health Outcomes research spans a broad spectrum of issues related to health-care delivery, from studies evaluating effectiveness of a pharmaceutical intervention, to the impact of reimbursement policies on outcomes of care. Applicants holding academic rank of instructor or assistant professor, and investigators at the doctoral level with equivalent positions, are eligible to apply.
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Early Stage Scientist
The Bridge to Independence Award program promotes talented early-career scientists by facilitating their transition to research independence and providing grant funding at the start of their professorships. Awards are aimed at senior postdoctoral fellows who intend to seek tenure-track faculty positions during the upcoming academic year. Awardees will receive a commitment of $495,000 over three years, activated upon assumption of a tenure-track professorship.
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Early Stage Scientist

Whitehall Foundation - Research Grants

DEADLINE: LOI Deadlines: January, April, October

The Whitehall Foundation, through its program of grants and grants-in-aid, assists scholarly research in the life sciences. It is the Foundation's policy to assist those dynamic areas of basic biological research that are not heavily supported by Federal Agencies or other foundations with specialized missions. The Foundation emphasizes the support of young scientists at the beginning of their careers and productive senior scientists who wish to move into new fields of interest. Consideration is given, however, to applicants of all ages. The chief criteria for support are the quality and creativity of the research as well as the commitment of the Principal Investigator (a minimum time allocation of 20% is required). The principal investigator must hold no less than the position of assistant professor, or the equivalent, in order to participate in the application process. The applicant need not be in a tenure track position but must be an independent researcher and have Principal Investigator status at his/her institution, usually construed as having lab space independent of another Principal Investigator. The Foundation is currently interested in basic research in neurobiology, defined as follows: Invertebrate and vertebrate (excluding clinical) neurobiology, specifically investigations of neural mechanisms involved in sensory, motor, and other complex functions of the whole organism as these relate to behavior. The overall goal should be to better understand behavioral output or brain mechanisms of behavior. The Foundation does not support research focused primarily on disease(s) unless it will also provide insights into normal functioning. Research grants are available to established scientists of all ages working at accredited institutions in the United States. Applications will be judged on the scientific merit and the innovative aspects of the proposal as well as on the competence of the applicant. Research grants of up to three years will be provided. A renewal grant with a maximum of two years is possible, but it will be awarded on a competitive basis. Research grants will not be awarded to investigators who have already received, or expect to receive, substantial support from other sources, even if it is for an unrelated purpose. Research grants normally range from $30,000 to $75,000 per year.
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Established Scientist
The purpose of the grant is to fund research in strategies leading to the development of therapies to prevent the transition from pre-leukemia to leukemia for patients with FPD/AML. Projects should focus on leukemia caused by familial RUNX1 mutations rather than sporadic AML with somatic RUNX1 mutations. Two Year Grant Amount: $250,000; up to $125,000 per year may be requested.
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Established Scientist
These awards will support investigators pursuing research studies in human populations using epidemiological approaches aimed at improving our understanding of childhood cancer. This grant mechanism is designed to support hypothesis-driven research that focuses on the epidemiology, early detection and prevention of childhood cancer or comparative effectiveness and outcomes research related to detection, prevention, and treatment. Applicants should be at the Assistant, Associate or Full Professor level and have a history of formal training in disciplines that are relevant to the proposed research or a track record of conducting similar epidemiological or cancer research, including peer-reviewed publications and funding, that demonstrates the project can be accomplished by the investigator. Funding for two years, maximum of $100,000 per year, may be requested for direct costs.
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Established Scientist
Innovation Grants are designed as seed funding for researchers with a novel approach to pediatric oncology scientific investigation. This may represent a change in research direction and/or an innovative new idea that moves away from an investigator's prior research but for which a strong case is made for the potential impact on childhood cancers. Innovation Grants will support research proposals to be carried out by investigators who are already established, have a recent track record of peer-reviewed publications and evidence of successfully competing for extramural funding. The grant is for two years up to $125,000 per year for direct costs only. Applicants must have a faculty appointment at an academic institution. Track record of publication and funding productivity in the last 5 years must demonstrate that the project can be accomplished by the investigator(s).
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Established Scientist
The purpose of the Reach Grant is to find cures and better treatments for childhood cancers by providing support to move hypothesis-driven research into the clinic. The goal of this award is to support selected late translational studies. Preference will be given to those research projects which, if funded, will likely result in the initiation of a clinical trial two to three years from the start of the project. Applicants may be Assistant, Associate or Professor level investigators who demonstrate a track record of discovery, investigation and external funding and who have a demonstrated track record of pediatric cancer research with experience in translational research. A maximum of $125,000 in total costs may be requested per year and a maximum of two years of funding may be requested.
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Established Scientist
Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy, Inc. (ACGT) funds research aimed at furthering the development of cell and gene therapy approaches to the treatment of cancer. Preference will be given to those working in solid tumors, orphan tumors or pediatric tumors, and to research not previously funded, thus highly innovative proposals. The award provides up to a maximum of $500,000 distributed over 2-3 years, inclusive of a maximum of 10% indirect costs. Candidates for the Investigator's Award in Cell and Gene Therapy for Cancer must hold an MD, PhD, or equivalent degree and must be tenure-track or tenured faculty. The investigator must be conducting original research as an independent faculty member.
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Established Scientist

Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation - Drug Discovery Program

DEADLINE: LOI Deadlines January, April, July, October

The Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) has long recognized the need to bridge the translational funding gap between early-stage drug discovery and clinical development for Alzheimer's disease, related dementias, and cognitive aging by supporting promising therapeutic approaches. The Drug Discovery RFP supports novel drug programs aiming to advance novel lead molecules to the clinical candidate selection stage; and repurposed/repositioned programs aiming to build preclinical evidence in relevant animal models for repurposed drugs (existing drugs that are approved for other diseases and conditions) and repositioned drugs (existing drugs that have entered clinical trials for other indications and have not yet been approved). Funding is open to researchers and clinicians worldwide at academic medical centers and universities or nonprofits. Industry partnerships are strongly encouraged. Funding is $150,000-$600,000 based on stage and scope of research and is typically for one year with potential for follow-on funding. Multi-year proposals can be considered.
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Established Scientist

American Cancer Society - Research Professor Grant

DEADLINE: Letter of Intent Deadline: August 1; Application Deadline: October 15

The American Cancer Society offers a limited number of grants to mid-career investigators who have made seminal contributions in the area of cancer control that have changed the direction of clinical, psychosocial, behavioral, health policy or epidemiologic cancer research. It is expected that these investigators will continue to provide leadership in their research area. Applicants will have attained the rank of full professor. Up to two awards are made annually for a five-year term that can be renewed once. The award of up to $80,000 per year (direct costs only) may be used for salary or research project support.
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Established Scientist

American Cancer Society - Research Professor Grant

DEADLINE: Letter of Intent Deadline: February 1; Application Deadline: April 1

The American Cancer Society offers a limited number of grants to mid-career investigators who have made seminal contributions that have changed the direction of basic cancer research. It is expected that these investigators will continue to provide leadership in their research area. Applicants will have attained the rank of full professor. Up to two awards are made annually for a five-year term that can be renewed once. The award of up to $80,000 per year (direct costs only) may be used for salary or research project support.
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Established Scientist
These awards support basic research with novel and innovative hypotheses in any area relevant to the etiology or pathophysiology of diabetes and its complications that holds significant promise for advancing the prevention, cure or treatment of diabetes. Applications proposing high-risk projects with the potential for high-impact results are encouraged, as are studies that may not be sufficiently developed for traditional funding sources. Any level of faculty authorized to work in the United States is eligible to apply. Awards provide up to $115,000 per year for up to three years, including indirect costs.
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Established Scientist
These awards support research with novel and innovative hypotheses, performed in human subjects, or research approaches to accelerate the transition of scientific discoveries into clinical application. Studies supported with these awards must directly involve human subjects, human samples, and/or data, and offer considerable promise for advancing the cure, prevention, or treatment of diabetes. Applications proposing high-risk projects with the potential for high-impact results are encouraged, as are studies that may not be sufficiently developed for traditional funding sources. Any level of faculty authorized to work in the United States is eligible to apply. Awards provide up to $200,000 per year for up to three years, including indirect costs.
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Established Scientist

American Heart Association - Collaborative Sciences Award

DEADLINE: LOI Deadline: October 8; Application Deadline: January 30

To foster innovative, new collaborative approaches to research projects which propose novel pairings of investigators from at least two broadly disparate disciplines. The proposal must focus on the collaborative relationship, such that the scientific objectives could not be achieved without the efforts of at least two co- principal investigators and their respective disciplines. The combination and integration of studies may be inclusive of basic, clinical, population and/or translational research. Applications by existing collaborators are permitted, provided that the proposal is for a new idea or new approach that has not been funded before. Projects must include at least one Co-PI from a field outside cardiovascular disease and stroke. This award is also intended to foster collaboration between established and early- or mid-career investigators. Awards are for a three-year period, $250,000 annually for a total of $750,000.
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Established Scientist

American Heart Association - Established Investigator Award

DEADLINE: LOI Deadline: October 10; Application Deadline: January 15

The Established Investigator Award supports mid-career investigators (typically at associate professor level) with unusual promise and established records of accomplishments; candidates should have a demonstrated commitment to cardiovascular or cerebrovascular science disciplines, as indicated by prior publication history and scientific accomplishments. The applicant should have an M.D., Ph.D., D.O. or equivalent doctoral degree, be in a faculty/staff scientist position or equivalent (at the time of award activation, the awardee must be at the level of associate professor/staff scientist or equivalent) and have current national-level funding as a principal investigator (or co-PI) on an R01 grant or its equivalent. Awards are for five years, non-renewable, for $80,000 per year, including 10 percent indirect costs, for a total award of $400,000.
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Established Scientist
The Innovative Project Award supports highly innovative, high-impact research that could ultimately lead to critical discoveries or major advancements that will accelerate the field of cardiovascular or stroke research. Research deemed innovative that may introduce a new paradigm, challenge current paradigms, look at existing problems from new perspectives, or exhibit other uniquely creative qualities is desired. The Innovative Project Award promotes unexplored ideas; therefore, preliminary data is not accepted as part of the proposal, however, a solid rationale for the work must be provided. The candidate must hold a post-baccalaureate Ph.D. degree or equivalent, or a doctoral-level clinical degree, such as M.D., D.O., D.V.M., Pharm.D., or Ph.D. in nursing, public health, or other clinical health science. This program places no limit on eligibility based on career stage, academic rank or discipline. The award is for two years, $100,000 per year, including 10 percent indirect costs, for a total award of $200,000.
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Established Scientist

American Heart Association - Merit Award

DEADLINE: LOI Deadline: July 11

This award will support exceptional scientists with established track records of success, who propose novel approaches to major research challenges in the areas of CV and stroke that have the potential to produce unusually high impact. This competition will enable AHA to further develop and strengthen the community of CV and stroke researchers and bring innovative approaches to basic, clinical, population and translational studies through funding a variety of disciplines. Applications are encouraged from all basic disciplines as well as epidemiological, behavioral, community and clinical investigations that bear on cardiovascular and stroke problems and must describe the capacity of the investigator's work to transform fundamental scientific understanding, clinical practice, and/or public health policy. Applicant requirements: Ph.D. and/or M.D. (or the equivalent), tenured or tenure-track professor, principal investigator on multiple active, national peer-reviewed research awards of at least three years duration, such as an NIH R01 grant, at the time of application. Awards are for a five-year period, $200,000 annually for a total of $1,000,000.
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This award supports highly innovative, high-impact projects that build on work in progress that could ultimately lead to critical discoveries or major advancements that will accelerate the field of cardiovascular and stroke research. Clinical, translational, population, and basic scientists are encouraged to apply. The extent to which the focus of the project is related to CVD and/or stroke is an important factor that will be considered. The candidate must hold a post-baccalaureate Ph.D. degree or equivalent, or a doctoral-level clinical degree, such as M.D., D.O., D.V.M., Pharm.D., or Ph.D. in nursing, public health, or other clinical health science. This program places no limit on eligibility based on career stage, academic rank or discipline. The award is $100,000 per year for 3 years ($300,000 total), including 10 percent indirect costs.
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American Lung Association - Lung Cancer Discovery Award

DEADLINE: LOI Deadline: October 3; Application Deadline: January 23

The Lung Cancer Discovery Award is for highly meritorious research projects with the potential to: significantly improve and transform diagnostic and therapeutic paradigms; foster innovation, use novel approaches; and/or accelerate progress in lung cancer research that improves patient care and helps save lives. This award is $100,000 per year for up to two years. The objective of the award is to support independent investigators conducting clinical, laboratory, epidemiological or any groundbreaking project aimed at revolutionizing our current understanding of lung cancer and improving diagnostic, clinical and treatment methods. At the time of application, an applicant must hold a doctoral degree, have a faculty appointment at an academic institution (including research institutions not formally associated with a university), and have completed a training fellowship. Applicants may be at any level of research experience and must be independent, self-directed researchers.
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Clinician-Researcher Awards support hypothesis-driven clinical research projects that have significant potential to advance our understanding of Dravet syndrome; slow or halt the of progression of the disease, characteristics, or comorbidities of the disease; and/or reduce mortality. The projects must be patient-oriented, with the investigator directly interacting with human subjects/patients. This includes studies such as therapeutic interventions or support/extension of existing clinical trials. Award funds of $150,000 for two years ($75,000 per year) are made to the affiliated institution in four payments, the second of which is dependent on IRB approval if not required for the first portion of the funding period.
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Research Grant Awards are intended for established, experienced, independent investigators affiliated with a research or academic institution whose proposed projects investigate hypotheses directly related to Dravet syndrome. Proposals are scored according to NIH guidelines based on the quality of preliminary data, research design, feasibility, investigator's qualifications, and overall impact. Grants are awarded for $150,000 over 2 years (beginning January 1 of each year), with indirect costs not to exceed 10% of the award. Our 2019 priority areas include: Transformative research to enhance our understanding of the cellular, molecular, genetic and systems-level mechanisms that lead to Dravet syndrome, facilitating the continued investigation of disease-modifying or preventative strategies; Research that will encourage the development of novel therapies to prevent onset or halt the progression of the Dravet syndrome; and Research focused on new, effective treatments for Dravet syndrome and/or its comorbidities.
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The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) is seeking creative and innovative scientists to join its Investigator Program. Through this competition, HHMI will expand our community of basic researchers and physician scientists across the nation who catalyze discovery research in basic and biomedical sciences, plant biology, evolutionary biology, biophysics, chemical biology, biomedical engineering, and computational biology. Approximately 20 new Investigators will be selected in this competition. The Investigator Program is open to individuals who: hold a PhD and/or MD (or the equivalent); have a tenured or tenure-track position as an assistant professor or higher academic rank (or the equivalent) at an eligible US institution (federal government employees are not eligible); have more than five but no more than 15 years of post-training, professional experience; are the principal investigator on one or more active, national, peer-reviewed research grants with an initial duration of at least three years (mentored awards and training grants do not qualify; multi-investigator grants may qualify). Some important conditions of the HHMI Investigator appointment: although they retain academic appointments at their respective institutions, Investigators must become full-time employees of HHMI, which provides full salary and benefits; investigators are appointed for a seven-year, renewable period; investigators are required to devote at least 75% of their professional activities to the direct conduct of research; applicants with administrative responsibilities or other duties inconsistent with this time commitment may apply but must reduce those other commitments prior to their appointment. HHMI pays the full salary of the Investigator and offers a comprehensive benefits package to Investigators and other eligible employees. Once semifinalists are identified, they will be provided with a current description of HHMI benefits for planning purposes.
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Scholar in Clinical Research Award applicants must be highly qualified investigators who hold an independent faculty-level appointment and who are conducting original, independent applied research, often involving early-stage clinical trials that will advance the prevention, diagnosis or treatment of hematologic malignancies. The research should be related to their clinical activities, and must involve patients. Scholar in Clinical Research applicants must: have a Sponsor who will attest to institutional support such as a department head, chief of service, or program chair for the applicant; be an independent investigator of at least an Assistant Professor position or equivalent including any permanent, independent clinical faculty who are not on a laboratory-based, tenure-track career path; have clinical training in blood cancer; have adequate funding to support the proposed research; have started their first independent position within 10 years of the time of review; have protected time for research after the funding start date in the range of 20-40% (if an investigator is more laboratory-based than clinic-based, they cannot apply for this award and should consider the Scholar award); be performing clinical research involving patients (generally clinical trials), which is related to their clinical duties. The award is $125,000 per year for five years ($625,000 total).
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The Lung Cancer Research Foundation and Pfizer Global Medical Grants are collaborating to offer a new research grant opportunity focused on understanding ways to improve clinical practices for side effect management for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving targeted therapies. Proposals on a variety of topics including the following are encouraged: Patterns of real-world versus pre-approval patient side-effect experiences; Defining and understanding tolerability (including late toxicities and patient reported outcomes); Role of diverse, multi-disciplinary teams (including pharmacists, dieticians, caregivers, etc.) and coordination of care in managing and monitoring therapy; Real-time symptom monitoring; and Implementation science approaches to improving care delivery. Pfizer and LCRF will support up to three innovative health services research projects focused on the improved management of treatment toxicities from targeted therapies in NSCLC patients. Specifically, up to $350,000 will be provided over a period of two years.
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The Lung Cancer Research Foundation's annual pilot grant program provides funding for research focused on the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure of lung cancer. The goal of the program is to fund innovative projects across the spectrum of basic, translational, and clinical research. We encourage applications for projects investigating a wide variety of topics including Improving our understanding of lung cancer biology; Prevention and screening for early detection; Identification of new biomarkers and the development of targeted therapies; and Development of more effective and safer therapies. Investigators must be affiliated with a non-profit academic or research institution and must fall into one of the following categories: Students and fellows; Young and mid-career investigators with less than ten years experience since initial faculty appointment; Non-tenure track researchers, staff scientists, and clinicians (any number years of experience). The maximum award amount is $150,000 for a period of two years (disbursed at $75,000 per year).
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These awards are targeted to established investigators with a track record in myeloma or related disorders, and are designed for projects which represent a different focus, direction, or area of research from those in which they are currently funded. In most cases, these awards will be for pilot projects to obtain sufficient funding for larger applications from NIH or similar larger funding agencies. The awards are $80,000 for one year.
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Whitehall Foundation - Research Grants

DEADLINE: LOI Deadlines: January, April, October

The Whitehall Foundation, through its program of grants and grants-in-aid, assists scholarly research in the life sciences. It is the Foundation's policy to assist those dynamic areas of basic biological research that are not heavily supported by Federal Agencies or other foundations with specialized missions. The Foundation emphasizes the support of young scientists at the beginning of their careers and productive senior scientists who wish to move into new fields of interest. Consideration is given, however, to applicants of all ages. The chief criteria for support are the quality and creativity of the research as well as the commitment of the Principal Investigator (a minimum time allocation of 20% is required). The principal investigator must hold no less than the position of assistant professor, or the equivalent, in order to participate in the application process. The applicant need not be in a tenure track position but must be an independent researcher and have Principal Investigator status at his/her institution, usually construed as having lab space independent of another Principal Investigator. The Foundation is currently interested in basic research in neurobiology, defined as follows: Invertebrate and vertebrate (excluding clinical) neurobiology, specifically investigations of neural mechanisms involved in sensory, motor, and other complex functions of the whole organism as these relate to behavior. The overall goal should be to better understand behavioral output or brain mechanisms of behavior. The Foundation does not support research focused primarily on disease(s) unless it will also provide insights into normal functioning. Research grants are available to established scientists of all ages working at accredited institutions in the United States. Applications will be judged on the scientific merit and the innovative aspects of the proposal as well as on the competence of the applicant. Research grants of up to three years will be provided. A renewal grant with a maximum of two years is possible, but it will be awarded on a competitive basis. Research grants will not be awarded to investigators who have already received, or expect to receive, substantial support from other sources, even if it is for an unrelated purpose. Research grants normally range from $30,000 to $75,000 per year.
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