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Media Coverage

16
The Washington Post
Even casually smoking marijuana can change your brain, study says

“Some of these people only used marijuana to get high once or twice a week,” said co-author Hans Breiter, quoted in Northwestern University’s Science Newsline. Breiter hailed the study as the first to analyze the effects of light marijuana use. “People think a little recreational use shouldn’t cause a problem, if someone is doing OK with work or school,” he said. “Our data directly says this is not the case.”

CNN
Casual marijuana use may damage your brain

The median use was six joints a week, but there were four people who said they smoked more than 20 joints a week. None of the users reported any problems with school, work, legal issues, parents or relationships, according to Dr. Hans Breiter, co-senior author of the study and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

NBC News (National)
Marijuana Re-Shapes Brains of Users, Study Claims

“Anytime you find there’s a relationship to the amount of marijuana consumed, and you see differences of core brain regions involved in processing of rewards, the making of decisions, the ability to assess emotions, that is a serious issue,” said Dr. Hans Breiter, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a study co-author.

Fox News (National)
New dads have increased risk of depression, study says

"We knew that paternal depression existed and it affects about 5 to 10 percent of dads - and there are seven million fathers in the U.S," said Garfield, a pediatrician and researcher at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

15
TIME Magazine
Recreational Pot Use Harmful to Young People’s Brains

“We looked specifically at people who have no adverse impacts from marijuana — no problems with work, school, the law, relationships, no addiction issues,” says Hans Breiter, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Feinberg School and co–senior author of the study.

USA Today
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/04/15/marijuana-brain-changes/7

"Just casual use appears to create changes in the brain in areas you don't want to change," said Hans Breiter, a psychiatrist and mathematician at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, who led the new study.

Fox News (National)
Casual marijuana use linked with brain abnormalities, study finds

“There were abnormalities in their working memory, which is fundamental to everything you do,” Breiter, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, told FoxNews.com.  “When you make judgments or decisions, plan things, do mathematics – anything you do always involves working memory.  It’s one of the core fundamental aspects of our brains that we use every day.  So given those findings, we decided we need to look at casual, recreational use.”

ABC News
Study Finds Signs of Brain Changes in Pot Smokers

Longer-term studies will be needed to see if such brain changes cause any symptoms over time, said Breiter, of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Yahoo! News
Even Casual Pot Use Changes the Brain

"The common folklore in the general population is that causal marijuana use does not hurt you," but these findings argue that this may not be the case, said study researcher Dr. Hans Breiter, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

14
TIME Magazine
Young Dads Are at Risk for Postpartum Depression

“Parental depression has a detrimental effect on kids, especially during those first key years of parent-infant attachment,” said lead study author Dr. Craig Garfield, an associate professor in pediatrics and medical social sciences at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, in a statement. “We need to do a better job of helping young dads transition through that time period.”

USA Today
Depression risks increase for young dads

"There's been a significant body of literature describing the effect of mother's depression on child development, and the health care system has tried to rise to the challenge of identifying mothers with depression," says Craig Garfield, an associate professor in pediatrics and medical social sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and lead author of the study. "Fathers have not been on the radar screen until recently. Now we know that ... right around the time of the birth is an important time to try and capture and screen those dads."

US News & World Report
Young Dads at Risk of Depressive Symptoms, Study Finds

"But this does show us a time period where fathers are at increased risk," said lead researcher Dr. Craig Garfield, an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Chicago Tribune
A doctor, an HIV diagnosis and a dog

Robert Garofalo is the division head of adolescent medicine at Lurie Children's Hospital and an associate professor of pediatrics and preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. He said it was never lost on him that he couldn't show himself the same compassion he'd shown his patients or tried to instill in his students.

10
CNN (National)
Will you 'like' the doctor who tells you you're dying?

Dr. Mary F Mulcahy is an associate professor in the hematology oncology department at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and a co-founder of Life Matters Media, which provides information and support for those involved in end of life decision-making.

09
Chicago Tribune
Obamacare and its effect on women's health

Dr. Lauren Streicher, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, said one patient asked about having her fallopian tubes tied as a form of birth control. "When I told her it would be easier for her husband to have a vasectomy, she said, 'Vasectomy is not covered by our insurance, but tubal ligation is,'" Streicher said.

07
Chicago Tribune
Medical students help homeless outreach program

For the next 90 minutes, the student at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine and four other volunteers weaved through throngs of tourists and shoppers, scanning the crowds in search of the diverse face of Streeterville's homeless population.

Fox News (National)
Childhood eczema may last into adulthood, study says

"We now have a number of really promising therapies that are emerging that are really targeting eczema," said Dr. Jonathan Silverberg, of the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago.

NBC News (National)
Viagra May Boost Risk of Deadly Skin Cancer, Study Finds

Primary care doctors who treat older men taking Viagra should check their patients for signs of skin cancer, said Dr. June Robinson of Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, who wrote an accompanying editorial.

The Washington Post
To slim down, it helps to get up early and see the light, study says

With all this in mind, researchers at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago persuaded 54 volunteers to wear a wrist monitor that measured their light exposure (including its timing and intensity) as well as their sleep patterns.

Chicago Tribune
Your best ideas to improve the lives of disadvantaged Chicagoans

A breathtaking array of readers' proposals flow from one belief: Disadvantaged children need engaged adults — not just parents and teachers, but mentors too. That idea of volunteers as force multipliers drives an intriguing proposal from Dr. Sidney Weissman, a professor of clinical psychiatry at Northwestern University.

Chicago Tribune
Becky Vinehout, stylist helps surgical patients

"Becky is unique in combining her expertise and services with her experience with her own surgery," said Dr. Joshua Rosenow, a neurosurgeon at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. "Depending on the operation, each patient needs a very different haircut after surgery. Becky takes a diagram of the surgery that we give her, then tailors a haircut to fit. Consequently, it helps the patients with self-esteem, which helps them feel better."

The Boston Globe
Are cardiologists refusing to follow new cholesterol recommendations?

That reluctance is perfectly fine, said Dr. Neil Stone, the Northwestern University cardiologist who led the committee that authored the new guideline. “The risk estimator was designed to start a conversation,” he told me, not dictate who should go on statin drugs. “Patient preference is a very important part of this guideline, and we were very strong in emphasizing lifestyle changes over medication.”

03
CBS News (National)
Morning sunshine may help you stay slim

"We were very interested in looking at the relationship between lighting and how that may be affecting your weight," explained study senior author Dr. Phyllis Zee, director of the sleep disorders center at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

NPR
Good Day Sunshine: Could Morning Light Help Keep Us Lean?

To better understand this relationship, researchers at Northwestern University recruited 54 adults (average age 30) from the Chicago area and had them wear wrist monitors that tracked their exposure to light and sleep patterns for a week.

The Huffington Post
How Bright Light In The Morning Might Affect Your Weight

"Getting more light in the day was associated with a lower BMI," said study author Dr. Phyllis Zee, a professor of neurology at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Crain's Chicago Business (From Associated Press)
Northwestern Medicine launches new lung transplant program

Northwestern Medicine in Chicago is launching a new program it hopes will address a shortage of lung transplant surgeries in Illinois.

Web MD
The Morning Light May Help You Stay Slim

"We were very interested in looking at the relationship between lighting and how that may be affecting your weight," explained study senior author Dr. Phyllis Zee, director of the sleep disorders center at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Phys Org
Off the shelf, on the skin: Stick-on electronic patches for health monitoring

"We designed this device to monitor human health 24/7, but without interfering with a person's daily activity," said Yonggang Huang, the Northwestern University professor who co-led the work with Illinois professor John A. Rogers.


02
NBC News (National)
Morning Light Could Be Key to Leaner Physique, Study Finds

That’s according to researchers at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, who discovered a new way to measure the combined impact of light timing, duration and intensity on BMI, a ratio of height to weight.

Fox News (National)
Too stressed for sex? 3 ways to prevent stress from ruining your love life

Laura Berman, PhD, obstetrics and gynecology, writes in a column on Fox News regarding how stress may affect sexual activity and gives tips for balancing sexual activity with daily stresses.

Men's Health
The Easiest Way to Keep Off Weight

Good news for your waistline: A shot of sunshine in the morning may lower your body mass index (BMI), according to a new study from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

Shape
Early Birds, Rejoice! Morning Sunlight Connected to Lower BMI

Here’s a reason to set that alarm a little earlier: Being exposed to sunlight early in the morning (instead of later in the day) is associated with a lower BMI, a new Northwestern University School of Medicine study reports.

Prevention
Can Morning Light Make You Thinner?

Researchers from Northwestern University recruited 54 participants with an average age of 30 and, using wrist monitors, kept tabs on their light exposure, activity, and sleep patterns for seven days.
 

01
Huffington Post
HIV-Positive Men May Face Higher Heart Disease Risk

For the study, researchers from Northwestern University, Johns Hopkins University, the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of Pittsburgh examined the heart health of 618 HIV-infected men and 383 men without HIV who were part of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study.

Phys Org
Northwestern study tests drug against Parkinson's disease

Tanya Simuni, M.D., medical director of Northwestern University's Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, was awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to conduct a $16 million phase III study of the safety and efficacy of the drug isradipine as a potential neuroprotective agent in Parkinson's disease.

31
Chicago Tribune
Drowsiness a danger on road as well as rails

Each person needs a certain amount of sleep, said Dr. Phyllis Zee, associate director of Northwestern University's Center for Sleep and Circadian Biology. And all of us are beholden to circadian rhythms that establish drowsy periods between 3 and 5 a.m. and 1 and 3 p.m.

Crain's Chicago Business
Is juicing harming your health?

Dr. Agus says no data exist to prove any of the benefits commonly associated with juicing. Dr. Clyde Yancy, chief of cardiology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, agrees.

“It's not as healthy as it would appear to be at first glance,” he says. A purely liquid diet does not contain sufficient protein and can disrupt cellular function when potassium levels dip too low, Dr. Yancy says.

Chicago Tribune (Blue Sky)
How the 'team sport' of biotech is improving its game in Illinois

The Illinois companies represented were Advanced Cooling Therapy, which seeks better methods to control body temperatures; Briteseed, which uses infrared imaging technology in surgical tools to help surgeons prevent accidental cuts into blood vessels; Cell Habitats, which promotes tissue repair by using biological and physical cues to prompt stem cells to restore damaged tissues; Inspirotec, a company that builds early warning systems for airborne viruses and allergens; and Sintact Medical Systems, a company started at Northwestern University and based in Bloomington, Ind., that develops surgical films that keep adjacent organs from adhering to each other after surgery.

Philadelphia Inquirer
Campaign against a medical procedure gains

Most morcellator injuries to abdominal organs are not reported to the FDA, said Northwestern University's chief of gynecologic surgery, Magdy Milad, whose research found only 55 such reports over the last 15 years.

Bloomberg Businessweek
Heart failure patients live longer with advanced defibrillators

Slowing the disease is key, said Robert Bonow, professor of cardiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

29
Associated Press
Schools increasingly check students for obesity

Schools, over medical clinics, have the advantage of having access to the largest number of children. The local data is valuable to researchers who have had a dearth of childhood obesity information, and it can be used to pinpoint places that need help, said Dr. Matt Longjohn, an assistant adjunct professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

The Wall Street Journal (from Associated Press)
Studies find new drugs greatly lower cholesterol

"There's great interest" in all of these drugs, but doctors will wait for evidence that they lower heart risks, said Dr. Neil Stone, a Northwestern University cardiologist and spokesman for the American Heart Association.

CBS 46 Atlanta
Studies find new drugs greatly lower cholesterol

"There's great interest" in all of these drugs, but doctors will wait for evidence that they lower heart risks, said Dr. Neil Stone, a Northwestern University cardiologist and spokesman for the American Heart Association.

28
Fox News (National)
Knee arthritis more likely after ACL reconstruction

When the ACL is compromised, the knee joint essentially gets looser, so bones put more pressure on cartilage, which then wears away quicker, said Yasin Dhaher. He studies orthopedic injuries at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.

Huffington Post
Smoke and mirrors cloud medical marijuana debate

There is much to educate the public -- particularly young people -- about the dangers of smoking today's psychotropic marijuana. For example, a recent Northwestern Medicine study reported that teenagers who were regular marijuana users had: abnormal changes in brain structures related to working memory, performed poorly on memory tasks (a predictor of poor academic performance and everyday functioning) and changes in brain structure associated with having schizophrenia. 

27
The Wall Street Journal
Do you take statins? If not, you may have to

“There are very few medications that have been studied as carefully as this class of drugs,” said Dr. Neil Stone, Bonow professor of medicine-cardiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, who chaired the writing committee for the new guidelines.

26
Huffington Post
Your kids' brains on spring break: 8 is the new 12

Putting the theory to the test, I made a call to Karen Gouze, Ph.D., director of training in psychology at Chicago's Children's Memorial Hospital and associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. Sure enough, her comments confirmed what we've observed.

Phys Org
The promise and peril of nanotechnology

Scientists at Northwestern University have found a way to detect metastatic breast cancer by arranging strands of DNA into spherical shapes and using them to cover a tiny particle of gold, creating a "nano-flare" that lights up only when it finds breast cancer cells.


25
Phys Org
Synthetic biologists break new ground in medicine, energy

With such ambitious goals as helping cure cancer and eradicating pervasive disease, some of the most talented scientists in the country from the emerging field of synthetic biology are breaking new ground at Northwestern University.


Becker's Hospital Review
100 Great Hospitals in America

Two of Chicago's oldest hospitals — Passavant Memorial, founded in 1865, and Wesley Memorial, founded in 1888 — merged in 1972 to form what is now known as Northwestern Memorial Hospital. The teaching hospital for Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Memorial Hospital also is home to a number of specialty clinics, such as the Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute, Kovler Organ Transplantation Center and Prentice Women's Hospital.

24
U.S. News & World Report
Targeted Radiation Might Help Fight Advanced Breast Cancer: Study

Researchers led by Dr. Robert Lewandowski, an associate professor of radiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, looked at the outcomes of 75 patients. 

Yahoo News
Y-90 Provides New, Safe Treatment for Metastatic Breast Cancer

"Although this is not a cure, Y-90 radioembolization can shrink liver tumors, relieve painful symptoms, improve the quality of life and potentially extend survival," said Robert J. Lewandowski, M.D., FSIR, associate professor of radiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Web MD
Targeted Radiation for Advanced Breast Cancer

Researchers led by Dr. Robert Lewandowski, an associate professor of radiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, looked at the outcomes of 75 patients. 

Crain's Chicago Business
Printed tissue could ease transplant shortages

One day, 3-D printers may produce real organs—livers, kidneys or hearts. Today, though, Ramille Shah is aiming for a little bit of bone.

For the past year, Ms. Shah, 36, head of the Tissue Engineering and Additive Manufacturing Lab at Northwestern University, has been using a 3-D printer to churn out a biodegradable bone substitute. Referred to as a “scaffold,” the material largely is made from the primary mineral found in bone tissue—a calcium compound called hydroxyapatite.

Crain's Chicago Business
3-D printing is revolutionizing surgery

In August 2011, Dr. Katherine Barsness walked into the innovation lab at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine and saw a small 3-D printed ribcage taped to the wall. It was a eureka moment of sorts for the training of doctors. 

The Philadelphia Inquirer
Tiny wireless pacemaker shows early promise

"This is an advance that will have a huge impact on the field," said Dr. Bradley Knight, a cardiologist at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a spokesman for the American Heart Association.

Modern Healthcare
3-D printing is revolutionizing surgery

In August 2011, Dr. Katherine Barsness walked into the innovation lab at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine and saw a small 3-D printed ribcage taped to the wall. It was a eureka moment of sorts for the training of doctors. 

23
Chicago Tribune
Fat-heart disease findings confusing, enticing

"You know that saying: 'If something is too good to be true, it probably is?' Well, that's the case here," said Linda Van Horn, a clinical nutrition epidemiologist and professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

22
Chicago Tribune
Doctors, psychologists battle over prescribing privileges

Dr. Joan Anzia, who oversees training for psychiatrists, physician's assistants and clinical psychologists at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine says doctors, nurses and others who prescribe medications typically train under 15 to 80 medical faculty supervisors with extensive experience in specific drug regimens.

21
NBC News (National)
How Airlines Screen Pilots in the US

Hear from Dr. Robert Noven, an aviation medical examiner at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, who explains why it can be tough to spot pilots with psychological problems during their FAA physical.

20
USA Today
Millions more would get statins based on new guidelines

"We think medicine should be more personalized based on evidence and the person's characteristics," said Stone, also a professor of medicine at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Reuters
New heart guidelines may put 12.8 million more Americans on statins

Dr Neil Stone, a professor of preventive cardiology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine who chaired the committee that issued the new guidelines, said that is precisely the point.

The Daily Mail (UK)
Disgusted by double-dipping? Afraid of finding a hair in your food? How things

Maria Colavincenzo, a dermatologist at Northwestern University, explains that the only real risk is that staph bacteria has latched onto a strand, which can cause diarrhea and an upset stomach.

Marketwatch
The cure for reducing medical errors: communication

“We ensure our communication is effective and none of the information is dropped,” says Beach, vice chairman and associate professor of emergency medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Modern Healthcare
Researchers identify 'bendopnea' as new symptom for heart failure

“It's a brilliant piece of work,” said American Heart Association spokesman Dr. Clyde Yancy, a cardiology professor at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. He did not work on the study, but is formerly part of the group that made the new observation.

19
CNBC (From Associated Press)
'Eye-opening' new report about statin elligibility

Dr. Neil Stone, the Northwestern University doctor who helped lead the guidelines work, stressed that the guidelines just say who should consider a statin, and they recommend people discuss that carefully with a doctor.

The Washington Post
Half of US adults 40 to 75 eligible for statins

Dr. Neil Stone, the Northwestern University doctor who helped lead the guidelines work, stressed that the guidelines just say who should consider a statin, and they recommend people discuss that carefully with a doctor.

Medical Daily
Nanotechnology Could Help Detect Cancer Cells

Dr. Chad Mirkin, a researcher at Northwestern University and one of the developers of the new technology, said in a press release that the innovation can help physicians spot red flags on an early cellular level.

18
FOX News (National)
Review questions effects of saturated fats on heart disease

Linda Van Horn, from the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, told Reuters Health the study was well done and demonstrated that some fatty acids are better than others.

Health Magazine
Bad News About Good Fats? Here's Why You Should Still Eat Fish


This should not affect guidelines or behavior,” adds Linda Van Horn, PhD, RD, professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago and an AHA spokesperson.

Huffington Post
These 'Gross' Things Are Actually Pretty Harmless

As Maria Colavincenzo, a dermatologist at Northwestern University explained: It's possible that staph bacteria, which can upset the stomach and bring on a case of diarrhea, could hitch a ride on a strand.

The Philadelphia Inquirer
Daily Fish Oil Supplement May Not Help Your Heart: Studies

Dr. Linda Van Horn, a professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a member of the nutrition committee of the American Heart Association (AHA), agreed.

Business Insider
Here's More Proof That Fat Isn't As Bad As Dietitians Once Thought

Linda Van Horn, from the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, told Reuters Health the study was well done and demonstrated that some fatty acids are better than others

MedPage Today
Tanezumab Eases OA Pain, Safety Still an Issue

To explore the possibility that combining tanezumab with naproxen or celecoxib would provide further benefits, Thomas J. Schnitzer, MD, PhD, of Northwestern University in Chicago, and colleagues enrolled 2,700 patients with hip or knee OA from February to December 2009.

17
TIME Magazine
Uh Oh, Unsaturated Fats May Not Be As 'Good' As We Thought

Dr. Linda Van Horn, professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University and a member of the nutrition committee of the American Heart Association, admits that the findings, particularly about saturated fat, raise some potentially valid questions that the committee will address at its next meeting.

Chicago Tribune
Dr. Stephen Ondra: Neurosurgeon's career included stop at White House

Though his growing family had just settled in Michigan and his wife was weary from several moves, Ondra in 1996 relented to cajoling from Dr. Hunt Batjer, who had been hired to rebuild the Department of Neurological Surgery at Northwestern.

At Northwestern, Ondra's career took off. In the 13 years he spent at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and the Feinberg School of Medicine, Ondra became a world-renowned spine surgeon and played a role in developing new surgical techniques.

15
The Daily Beast
Can Vaginal Gels And Female Condoms Prevent HIV?

“Condoms are great and really effective, but they are controlled by men,” says Patrick Kiser, a biomedical engineer at Northwestern University. “In societies where we don’t have parity [between the sexes] it’s very hard for women to negotiate condom use.”

14
CBS News (National)
Surgeons use 3D technology in brain surgery

Surgeons at Chicago's Northwestern Medicine hospital are pioneering a new approach to brain surgery, using 3D glasses and monitors to help them "see" better in the operating room. The hospital is one of only three in the country to regularly use the technology to remove brain tumors, CBS Chicago reported.

"(It) allows you to see a lot more," said neurosurgeon Dr. James Chandler, "and more importantly, perform more confident and safer surgeries."

Chicago Tribune
Cholesterol test now recommended for kids 9 to 11

Dr. Anita Chandra-Puri, a pediatrician with Northwestern Medicine in Chicago and a spokeswoman for the AAP, said a handful of her patients have shown elevated cholesterol in the past year. She has not prescribed medications.

Crain's Chicago Business
Northwestern Memorial makes west suburban play, again

Northwestern CEO Dean Harrison would head the new system, which would do business under the Northwestern Medicine brand.

13
Los Angeles Times
FDA wins high-profile support in consumer genetics kerfuffle

"The FDA was right to issue a warning to 23andMe," write Boston University bioethicist George Annas and Northwestern University's Dr. Sherman Elias, a professor emeritus of obstetrics and clinical genetics.
 

Becker's Hospital Review
Northwestern Memorial, Cadence Health to Merge

Northwestern Memorial HealthCare in Chicago and Cadence Health in Winfield, Ill., have signed a letter of intent to merge, marking Cadence's second attempt to attract a partner.

Modern Healthcare
Northwestern Memorial, Cadence Health in merger talks

Chicago's Northwestern Memorial HealthCare continued its suburban push with negotiations to form an integrated healthcare delivery system with Winfield, Ill.-based Cadence Health.

12
New York Times
Quitting Smoking Linked to Improved Mood

The current review serves as a reminder that tobacco withdrawal symptoms like anxiety can easily be confused with mental health problems, said Brian Hitsman of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Both he and Le Cook were not involved in the review.

Reuters
Quitting smoking linked to improved mood

The current review serves as a reminder that tobacco withdrawal symptoms like anxiety can easily be confused with mental health problems, said Brian Hitsman of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Both he and Le Cook were not involved in the review.

Yahoo! News
Quitting smoking linked to improved mood

The current review serves as a reminder that tobacco withdrawal symptoms like anxiety can easily be confused with mental health problems, said Brian Hitsman of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Both he and Le Cook were not involved in the review.

MedPage Today
CardioBuzz: Why a Selected HF Trial Population Is a Good Thing

The study published last week confirmed that the trial's participants were not typical of most patients hospitalized with acute heart failure, but Clyde Yancy, MD, chief of cardiology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine and a past president of the AHA, told me "that it is precisely because the treatment effect is selective that it is: 1) positive and 2) noteworthy."

Medical News Today
How can diagnosis for endometriosis be improved?

New research from Prof. Matthew Dyson and Dr. Serdar Bulun at Northwestern University, IL, challenges the retrograde menstruation theory, which they say cannot account for endometriosis that occurs independently from menstruation.

11
Becker's Spine Review
Minimally invasive spine surgery: Do benefits outweigh the risks?

"If someone is a spine surgeon already and comfortable with the techniques of spine surgery, then learning minimally invasive techniques is quite feasible," says Zachary A. Smith, MD, of Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago.

New Scientist
Microbes in space

Fred Turek of Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and colleagues will look at genetic changes resulting from cosmic radiation, or at differences in gut bacteria due to low gravity or astronaut diets. Such microbiome studiesonly began on the ISS this year, so there is a lot to learn.

Global Dispatch
Vaginal ring delivers herpes, HIV antivirals, contraceptives for months

A Northwestern University (NU) researcher has come up with a device that could change women’s reproductive health in a significant way–an intravaginal ring that delivers antiviral protection against HIV and herpes and contraceptives to protect against pregnancy.

10
News-Medical
New theory regarding cause and development of endometriosis

Matthew Dyson, research assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and and Serdar Bulun, MD, chair of obstetrics and gynecology at Feinberg and Northwestern Memorial Hospital, also identified a novel role for a family of key gene regulators in the uterus.

Sudan Vision
Contraceptive Protects against HIV

Developed by biomedical engineer Patrick Kiser from America's Northwestern University, the gadget has been billed as a "significant advance" in drug delivery technology.

News.am
Contraceptive ring against pregnancy and HIV

Researchers at Northwestern University have come up with a new option: An intravaginal ring that helps prevent pregnancy while simultaneously releasing low doses of an antiretroviral drug that reduces a woman’s risk of contracting both HIV and genital herpes.

09
Chicago Tribune
26 died from cold this year

"The amount of injuries we saw were less than we expected," said Dr. Rahul Khare, an associate professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, who has worked as an emergency physician at the hospital for 10 years.

08
Health India
Culprit behind gynecological condition endometriosis revealed

The discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists suggests epigenetic modification, a process that enhances or disrupts how DNA is read, is an integral component of the disease and its progression.

07
CNN News
5 studies you may have missed

A team of researchers, led by Northwestern University biomedical engineer Patrick Kiser, has developed an intravaginal ring designed to prevent HIV and unwanted pregnancy.

Prevention
The New Prostate Cancer Test That’s 3 Times More Accurate

A jump in a man’s PSA levels—while an indicator of possible prostate cancer—is much more likely to be a sign of an enlarged prostate or inflammation, explains William J. Catalona, MD, a urologist at Northwestern University who coauthored two studies that compared PSA screenings to the new index.

Yahoo! News
Experimental device could prevent HIV & pregnancy in women

"In many ways, you can think about this functioning similarly to a condom," said study co-author Patrick Kiser, a biomedical engineer at Northwestern University. 

My FOX DC
New contraceptive ring aims to protect against both pregnancy and HIV

Now, researchers at Northwestern University have come up with a new option: An intravaginal ring that helps prevent pregnancy while simultaneously releasing low doses of an antiretroviral drug that reduces a woman’s risk of contracting both HIV and genital herpes.

Talking Points Memo
Let’s Stop Pathologizing Rich People

Melissa Simon is the Vice Chair of Clinical Research in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Preventive Medicine and Medical Social Sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

MedCity News
Breast Cancer Startup Challenge taps university teams to move 10 NIH discoveri

And a team of students at Northwestern University have formed Orpheden Therapeutics to develop a personalized immunotherapy for various types of cancer.

Health India
Can an intravaginal ring protects against HIV and unwanted pregnancies?

A Northwestern University biomedical engineer has designed a first-of-its-kind intravaginal ring that reliably delivers an antiretroviral drug and a contraceptive for months.

Time Live (New Zealand)
Tests to start on ring to prevent pregnancy and HIV

A report on the ring and how it was developed by scientists at Northwestern University is published in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS ONE.

Science 2.0
New Theory On Cause Of Endometriosis

The discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists suggests epigenetic modification, a process that enhances or disrupts how DNA is read, is an integral component of the disease and its progression. 

06
NBC News
Expert Help On How To Manage Insomnia

Kelly Baron PhD, MPH, is an Instructor of Neurology at the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, and the founder of its Behavioral Sleep Medicine training program, which was accredited by the American Board of Sleep Medicine. 

Fox News
New contraceptive ring aims to protect against both pregnancy and HIV

Now, researchers at Northwestern University have come up with a new option: An intravaginal ring that helps prevent pregnancy while simultaneously releasing low doses of an antiretroviral drug that reduces a woman’s risk of contracting both HIV and genital herpes.

CBS News Chicago
Is It Ill-Advised For Doctors To Google Their Patients?

Dr. Kathy Neely, chairwoman of Northwestern Memorial Hospital’s Ethics Committee, says the issue comes down to trust between physician and patient.

Self Magazine
Could Birth Control One Day Protect You from STIs, Too?

A new long-lasting device could one day be available to protect women against both pregnancy and HIV, researchers at Northwestern University announced today.

Cosmopolitan UK
New contraceptive device protects against HIV and STDs as well as unwanted pre

Developed by biomedical engineer Patrick Kiser from Northwestern University in the US of A, it's been called a "significant advance" in drug delivery technology.

World Magazine
Alzheimer's patients teaching medical students to remember compassion

The program was pioneered at Northwestern University and has been adopted at a handful of other medical schools.

New Scientist
Long-lasting contraceptive also defends women from HIV

The problem isn't that the drugs are ineffective, it is that the gels and pills aren't used correctly, says Patrick Kiser at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.

Chicago Now
Kids think marijuana is safe, but pot is harmful to their developing brains

Hans Breiter, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine studied marijuana's impact on teens and concluded, "Marijuana is the ideal compound to screw up everything for a kid."

Belfast Telegraph
Contraceptive protects against HIV

Developed by biomedical engineer Patrick Kiser from America's Northwestern University, the gadget has been billed as a "significant advance" in drug delivery technology.

Times of India
New intravaginal ring protects against HIV

A Northwestern University biomedical engineer has designed a first-of-its-kind intravaginal ring that reliably delivers an antiretroviral drug and a contraceptive for months.

India Today
New intravaginal ring protects against HIV as well as unwanted pregnancy

A Northwestern University biomedical engineer has designed a first-of-its-kind intravaginal ring that reliably delivers an antiretroviral drug and a contraceptive for months.

05
Popular Science
New Wearable Device Could Protect Against HIV and Pregnancy

Northwestern University biomedical engineer and professor Patrick Kiser, with lead author Justin Clark, has made a 5.5-cm intravaginal ring (IVR) that contains levonorgestrel, a synthetic progestin hormone, and tenofovir, an anti-retroviral drug.

Voice of America
New Device Provides Long-lasting Protection Against HIV and Pregnancy

The intravaginal ring was developed over five years at Northwestern University by biomedical engineer Patrick Kiser and his colleagues.

Chicago Tribune
Northwestern startup a finalist in competition

Orpheden Therapeutics, a Northwestern University-backed student startup, is among 10 finalists announced Wednesday in the Breast Cancer Startup Challenge, a competition aimed at mining previously unused medical patents.

Salt Lake Tribune
U.-developed device may protect against AIDS, pregnancy

Clark was part of a team led by biomedical engineer Patrick Kiser, who has been working on the ring for about five years. Kiser recently left the U. for Northwestern University.

Minneapolis Star-Tribune
Parents, talk to your kids about health risks of heavy marijuana use

Falkowski cites studies from the National Academy of Sciences, Northwestern University and others that indicate marijuana use in teens and young adults may impair cognitive function, create subtle changes in memory and even lead to a drop in IQ in the heaviest users.

Health Canal
Northwestern Investigates Genetics of Parkinson's Disease

Simuni is a professor of neurology and director of the Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a physician at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.
 

04
The Washington Post
Alzheimer's buddy program pairs patients, students

The two are part of a “buddy” program pairing doctors-to-be with dementia patients, pioneered at Northwestern University and adopted at a handful of other medical schools.

ABC News
Alzheimer's Buddy Program Pairs Patients, Students

About 75 percent of Northwestern students who participate become doctors in fields that deal with Alzheimer's patients, said program director Darby Morhardt.

FOX News (Via Health Magazine)
Alzheimer's buddy program engages patients, teaches students

The two are part of a "buddy" program pairing doctors-to-be with dementia patients, pioneered at Northwestern University and adopted at a handful of other medical schools.

Yahoo! News
Teaching About Alzheimer's With Buddy System

A pioneer 'buddy' program at Northwestern University pairs medical students with Alzheimer's patients in the early stages, giving doctors-to-be a unique insight into a devastating disease and patients an opportunity to stay socially engaged.

The Huffington Post
Mega-Collaborations: How Big Teams Can Work Together

As the organizers of the 2013 Science of Team Science Conference at Northwestern University declared: "As scientists increasingly work together to achieve a common goal, they must become more proficient, not just in the technical and task components of their research, but also the collaborative skills that form the foundation for their science team."

Modern Healthcare
Resident work-hour limits, patient safety examined

Dr. Karl Bilimoria, director of surgical outcomes and the quality improvement center at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, will lead research that will examine how flexibility in general-surgery resident work hours affects clinical outcomes such as death and serious morbidity rates, lengths of stay and readmissions. Also, residents' perception “of their ability to care for patients and their own well-being” will be assessed.

Today's Hospitalist
Getting outpatient physicians to step up

"We always think about the 'pitchers' discharging patients, but not about the 'catchers' who receive them," says Lee Lindquist, MD, associate division chief of geriatrics at Chicago's Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. "We can do everything perfectly in the hospital, but if we're not convincing people to take their medications, it's not going to work." - See more at: http://www.todayshospitalist.com/index.php?b=articles_read&cnt=1842&tracking=Site_Search_Results#sthash.GeGLW9ZB.dpuf

Philadelphia Inquirer
Alzheimer's buddy program pairs patients, students

The two are part of a "buddy" program pairing doctors-to-be with dementia patients, pioneered at Northwestern University and adopted at a handful of other medical schools.

Calgary Herald
Cruel diagnosis turns doctor into patient and mentor in unusual Alzheimer's bu

The two are part of a "buddy" program pairing doctors-to-be with dementia patients, pioneered at Northwestern University and adopted at a handful of other medical schools.

Science Codex
Gonorrhea infections start from exposure to seminal fluid

The research, led by investigators at Northwestern University in Chicago, appears in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

03
WBEZ-FM NPR Chicago
House Calls: Health Care 101

Rahul Khare, associated professor in Emergency Medicine and Center for Healthcare Studies at Northwestern university, joins us to answer your questions.

Becker's Spine Review
Cost-Effectiveness: How Do MIS & Open Spine Surgeries Compare?

"I think you need to do a thorough cost analysis and outcomes analysis to really figure out true cost effectiveness," says Zachary A. Smith, MD, of Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. "Cost analyses show minimally invasive procedures cost about the same as open. The major advantage from the economic perspective is that patients return to work sooner and have less of a need for narcotics."

02
The New York Times
If Obesity Is a Disease, Then What?

The writer is a clinical research associate at the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University.

The Wall Street Journal
Pfizer pushes ahead with quest to sell over-the-counter Lipitor

"The new guidelines insist on a patient-clinician discussion before a statin prescription is written," says Dr. Stone, a cardiologist and professor at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

03
WGN News
Stopping strokes before the occur, new technology may help Read more: http://

Dr. Rod Passman, Northwestern Medicine: “The device is about a third of the size of a triple ‘A’ battery.

It looks like something out of a sci-fi movie … but this device isn’t a work of fiction.

Dr. Passman: “Before this, we were using a larger version of the device about six times the size.”

28
Chicago Tribune
Homicide rates drop with temperatures, but a word of caution

Dr. Marie L. Crandall is an associate professor of surgery and preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Forbes
Is Zohydro, The Super Potent New Opiate Painkiller, Just Too Dangerous?

Stuart Gitlow, MD, President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine; Daniel Busch, MD, of the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University.

Health Canal
Northwestern Medicine Physician is First in Midwest to Implant Remote Cardiac

“This device is constantly recording any abnormal rhythms of the heart,” said Passman, who is also a professor of medicine-cardiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

27
Forbes
American Heart Association Launches Accelerator To Find Internal Game Changers

According to Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones, Senior Associate Dean for Clinical and Translational Research at Northwestern University, “When the prevalence of atrial fibrillation is presently estimated between 2.5-6 million Americans, but also estimated to be 6-16 million by the end of 2015, we know invention and innovation are needed.”

Health Canal
Northwestern Medicine Researchers Offer Relief for Severe Facial Pain

Northwestern Medicine researchers have found a novel, multidisciplinary way to treat some suffering from this nerve disorder by using ultrasound techniques to help administer nerve blocks to stop the facial pain.

News-Medical
New prostate cancer screening method combines existing tests to increase accur

Northwestern Medicine is the first health care provider in the country to offer a new non-invasive blood test for prostate cancer that is nearly three times more accurate than the current standard prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test.

Product Design & Development
Nanoscale Freezing Leads to Better Imaging

Dr. Gale Woloschak, professor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine conducted the study. 

26
WGN-TV
New test means new way to fight prostate cancer

Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago is one of only two facilities in the U.S. offering the test right now, but it will soon be available throughout the country in March. 

The Huffington Post
Am I Going Through Menopause At 35?

Yes, this advice sounds obvious, but many female patients seem weirdly resistant to the idea that they might be pregnant—even if they would like to be, says Lauren Streicher, MD, an associate clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University’s medical school. 

The State
Northwestern gets grant to study sinus infection

Northwestern's Sinus and Allergy Center has received a grant of more than $8.4 million to study chronic rhinosinusitis, also called CRS, and to develop new treatments.

Health Canal
Beta-catenin alters T cells in lasting and harmful ways

Mary Mulcahy, Nichole Blatner and Elena M. Ramos of Northwestern University;

Phys Org
Northwestern Medicine debuts new prostate test, reducing need for invasive bio

Northwestern Medicine is the first health care provider in the country to offer a new non-invasive blood test for prostate cancer that is nearly three times more accurate than the current standard prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test.

25
Phys Org
Northwestern Medicine awarded $8.4 million for chronic rhino sinusitis

"There has traditionally been a lack of funding for CRS research," said Robert Kern, MD, chair of otolaryngology at Northwestern Memorial and the Feinberg School of Medicine. 

Inside Science
Exercise Improves Sleep - But Takes Time

"I was doling out this advice but the feedback I was getting back from my patients [was] that 'I tried it and I didn’t feel any better,'" said Kelly Glazer Baron, a psychologist at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

24
UPI
The more seniors sit, the greater their risk of disability

Lead author Dorothy Dunlop, a professor of medicine at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, said the study is the first to show sedentary behavior is its own risk factor for disability, separate from lack of moderate vigorous physical activity. In fact, sedentary behavior is almost as strong a risk factor for disability as lack of moderate exercise.

The Boston Globe
Be Well: Sitting may raise disability risk for older Americans

Prolonged sitting for adults aged 60 or older as much as doubles their risk for physical disabilities, according to a study from Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Northwestern gets grant to study sinus infection

Research on a type of long-lasting sinus infection is getting a boost at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago.

The Californian
Sedentary at 60 linked to higher risk of disability

Every additional hour adults over age 60 spend sitting increases by 50 percent their risk of being disabled for activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing and walking, says the study’s lead author Dorothy Dunlop, a professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Shape Magazine
Do Women Need More Sleep Than Men?

Kelly Glazer Baron, Ph.D., clinical psychologist and director of the Behavioral Sleep Program at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, adds that bad sleep can become a vicious cycle: 

Forbes
Can You Trust What's In Your Electronic Medical Record?

A recent study from Northwestern University found that, “physicians with [EMRs] in their exam rooms spend one-third of their time looking at computer screens, compared with physicians who use paper charts who only spent about 9% of their time looking at them.”

23
Healthcare IT News
Embracing innovation with "crazy" ideas

"That was a crazy idea that really wasn't that crazy when you thought it through," said Lyle Berkowitz, MD, speaking Sunday at the HIMSS Innovation Symposium.

Living Healthy Chicago
HPV Vaccine: What You Should Know

The human papillomavirus or HPV, is the most common sexually transmitted illness in the U.S. according to Dr. Anita Chandra-Puri of Northwestern Medicine and is the leading cause of cervical cancer in the United States.

Living Healthy Chicago
Bringing Back the Benefits of Rooming In

“Nature is not so cruel as to make a woman lactate when there is no baby,” Dr. Malika Shah of Northwestern Memorial Hospital says.

Sioux City Journal
Lifestyle Choices for a Healthier Heart

Northwestern University researcher Bonnie Spring, Ph.D., said, "We already treat risk factors that can be measured through a blood sample or blood pressure reading, yet people put their health at risk through their behaviors." 

21
NPR
Ads Focused On A Few Drug Risks Might Make Them Memorable

The problem, as Michael Wolf, a health services researcher and cognitive scientist at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine describes it, is that most ads work like this:

U.S. News & World Report
Modern War Wounds Can Devastate Vets' Sexual, Emotional Health

It is hard to even imagine having your genitals crushed, burned or ripped off in a blast by a makeshift bomb, said Dr. Chris Gonzalez, the lead author of a new review article published recently in The Journal of Men's Health

Yahoo! Shine
6 Scary Things You Might Hear at Your Next OB-GYN Appointment (and Why You Sho

Your doctor will probably put you on birth control pills (or the ring, or the patch) to regulate your hormones, your period and other related issues, says Lauren Streicher, MD, an associate clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University's medical school.

Alabama Public Radio
Ads Focused On A Few Drug Risks Might Make Them Memorable

The problem, as Michael Wolf, a health services researcher and cognitive scientist at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine describes it, is that most ads work like this:

MinnPost
Health risks of prolonged sitting supported in another study

For the study, which appears in the Journal of Physical Activity & Health, researchers, led by Dorothy Dunlop, a professor of medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago, analyzed health data collected from more than 2,287 adults, age 60 or older, as part of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's ongoing National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

Irish Health
Too much sitting linked to disability

Being sedentary is not just a synonym for inadequate physical activity," commented the study's lead author, Prof Dorothy Dunlop, of Northwestern University in Chicago.

Pakistan Daily Times
Sitting down is a risk even with exercise

Dorothy Dunlop, professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and lead author of the study, said: ‘This is the first time we’ve shown sedentary behaviour was related to increased disability regardless of the amount of moderate exercise.

20
Yahoo! Shine
'Sitting disease' more harmful than originally thought

"This is the first time we've shown sedentary behaviour was related to increased disability regardless of the amount of moderate exercise," says Dorothy Dunlop, lead study author and medical professor at Northwestern University. "Being sedentary is not just a synonym for inadequate physical activity."

Becker's Spine Review
Is Outpatient Spine Surgery a Positive Trend? 5 Spine Surgeons Weigh In

Alpesh Patel, MD, Associate Professor in Orthopedic Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago: Absolutely. Not all cases and not all patients will be candidates for outpatient surgery.

19
USA Today
Don't just sit there! It could be harmful later in life

Every additional hour adults over age 60 spend sitting increases by 50% their risk of being disabled for activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing and walking, says the study's lead author Dorothy Dunlop, a professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. 

NPR
Sit More, And You're More Likely To Be Disabled After Age 60

"It threatens people's independence, and it also accounts for a large chunk of health care dollars," says Dorothy Dunlop, a public health and medicine researcher who led the study

U.S. News & World Report
Too Much Sitting After 60 May Lead to Disability, Study Says

"Sedentary behavior is its own separate risk factor [for disability]," said study researcher Dorothy Dunlop, a professor of medicine at the Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. 

Reuters
Sitting tied to disability among older Americans: study

"It was its own separate risk factor," Dorothy Dunlop told Reuters Health.

The Wall Street Journal - Market Watch
Medtronic Announces Global Launch of Miniature Cardiac Monitor, Reveal LINQ(TM

"The Reveal LINQ ICM monitor can help patients find answers to problems that may be heart-related without interrupting their lifestyle," said Rod Passman, M.D., professor and associate director of cardiac electrophysiology at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

CBS News
Every extra hour sitting on couch doubles seniors' disability risk, study find

"This is the first time we've shown sedentary behavior was related to increased disability regardless of the amount of moderate exercise," lead researcher Dr. Dorothy Dunlop, a professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, said in a press release.

NBC News
Couch Potato Today, Wheelchair Tomorrow? Study Links Sitting, Disability

To be clear, exercise is important, but it is only the beginning of a healthy lifestyle, said lead author Dorothy Dunlop, Ph.D., professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Fox News
Sitting linked to increased risk for disability, study shows

“But what we did not know is whether those were just two ways of looking at the same question – that is, if being sedentary meant you had insufficient activity, or whether it was a separate risk factor,” study author Dorothy Dunlop, a professor of medicine and preventive medicine at Northwestern, told FoxNews.com.

Chicago Tribune
Sitting tied to disability among older Americans: study

"It was its own separate risk factor," Dorothy Dunlop told Reuters Health.

CBS Chicago
New Study Points to Health Risk of Prolonged Sitting

Professor Dorothy Dunlop says it’s long been know that lack of exercise is a problem.

WTTW- Chicago Tonight
Is Sitting Hazardous to Your Health?

We chat with Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine professor Dorothy Dunlop, who is researching the issue.

Huffington Post
Too Much Time Spent Sitting Increases Disability Risk, Study Suggests

"This is the first time we’ve shown sedentary behavior was related to increased disability regardless of the amount of moderate exercise. Being sedentary is not just a synonym for inadequate physical activity," lead author Dorothy Dunlop said in a release. 

17
Crain's Chicago Business
How Lurie's move downtown affected its bottom line

Bharat Bhushan, who studies sleep disorders, says he no longer has to shuttle back and forth between the former Lincoln Park campus and the Feinberg School.

Chicago Redeye
Chicagoans who are loving this winter? Yes, they exist

"The thought is that with the loss of sunlight … some patients' biological cycles become disrupted," said Dr. Pedro Dago, who specializes in depression and bipolar disorder at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

MedPage Today
Brain Stimulation Aids Post-Stroke Arm Recovery

Almost half achieved a clinically important difference of at least 4.5 points on that measure compared with about 30% in the sham group, Richard Harvey, MD, of Northwestern University and the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, and colleagues found.

15
Bloomberg Businessweek
Study shows improved detection of atrial fibrillation

"Finding atrial fibrillation allows a more specific, tailored therapy to prevent a second stroke," said Dr. Richard Bernstein, author of the new study and a professor of neurology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

14
American Heart Association
Insertable heart monitor finds elusive atrial fibrillation after unexplained s

“Atrial fibrillation can be difficult to detect due to its sometimes intermittent nature, and the fact that it isn’t always accompanied by symptoms,” said Richard A. Bernstein, M.D., Ph.D., an author of the new study and professor of neurology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Fox News.com
Math saving lives: New models help address kidney organ donation shortages

“A kidney that may last someone 30 years may be given to someone with a 5-year life expectancy,” Dr. John Friedewald, an associate professor in medicine nephrology and surgery-organ transplantation at Northwestern University, told FoxNews.com.

Reuters
Study Finds Medtronic Insertable Cardiac Monitors Detect Atrial Fibrillation I

"These study results should make us reconsider how we approach cryptogenic stroke patients. Compared to standard care, continuous monitoring is superior when attempting to diagnose AF in this at-risk patient population, and ICMs offer these patients new hope," said Richard A. Bernstein, M.D., professor of neurology in the Davee Department of Neurology at Northwestern University and director of the Stroke Program at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, and member of the CRYSTAL AF steering committee.

Los Angeles Times
As marijuana laws change, health risks of pot use are weighed

In this case, the president seems to be more correct than the government, says Richard Miller, professor of pharmacology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

12
Yahoo! News
Northwestern Launches Online M.S. in Global Health

"Graduates of the MS in Global Health program will be prepared to identify needs, navigate complex political, sociological and regulatory environments and deliver impactful health care solutions," said Robert Murphy, M.D., director of the Center for Global Health and the John Philip Phair Professor of Infectious Diseases at Feinberg

Bloomberg Businessweek
Northwestern Launches Online M.S. in Global Health

"Graduates of the MS in Global Health program will be prepared to identify needs, navigate complex political, sociological and regulatory environments and deliver impactful health care solutions," said Robert Murphy, M.D., director of the Center for Global Health and the John Philip Phair Professor of Infectious Diseases at Feinberg.

11
U.S. News & World Report
The 'American Dream' May Be Bad for Your Health

Namratha Kandula is an assistant professor of medicine at Northwestern University.

Medical Xpress
New imaging technique can diagnose common heart condition

"Blood flow in patients with bicuspid aortic valves was significantly different compared to that in patients with normal valves," said senior author Michael Markl, associate professor of radiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

WBEZ
Afternoon Shift: Flu season, Typhoon Haiyan relief and presidential faiths

We talk with Dr. Raoul Khare from Northwestern Memorial Hospital about how to stay out of the ER. 

10
Crain's Chicago Business
Hot's not just for yoga anymore

Physiologically, exercising in the heat raises your heart rate higher and in a shorter amount of time than exercising in normal temperatures, says Dr. Rahul Khare, associate professor at Northwestern University and an emergency room physician at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago.

WGN-TV
Protecting skin from winter weather

Dr. Samantha Conrad, a Northwestern Medicine dermatologist says, “The decrease in humidity is the biggest one so as the temperature falls we have decreased humidity both inside and outside, and so even with humidifiers it’s really hard to keep up..."

WSTP-TV
Sex matters: Drugs can affect sexes differently

Dr. Melina Kibbe is a vascular surgeon who also runs a lab at Northwestern University Medical School, where she evaluates new therapies in mice and rats.

MedPage Today
Adding Non-Statin Leads to Even Lower LDL

Donald Lloyd-Jones, MD, of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, said the study "reaffirms exactly what we said in the prevention guidelines."

09
60 Minutes
Sex matters: Drugs can affect sexes differently

One of the reasons we haven’t learned more about women goes all the way back to the beginning of the scientific pipeline, to research on animals.  Dr. Melina Kibbe is a vascular surgeon who also runs a lab at Northwestern University Medical School, where she evaluates new therapies in mice and rats.

07
The Washington Post
How much do sex differences matter in sports?

As Alice Dreger, professor of clinical medical humanities and bioethics in the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, told me: “The reason we have females separated in sports is because in many sports, the best female athletes can’t compete with the best male athletes..." 

06
CNN
'Biggest Loser' winner: Too thin?

Severe weight reduction can result in hormone disruption or bone thinning (reduction in bone density) and can affect women's fertility, as they stop menstruating, said Lamm and Dr. Robert Kushner, clinical director of the Northwestern Comprehensive Center on Obesity in Chicago.

NBC News
Visualization Contest Celebrates Science's Stars of the Show

People's Choice: "Spherical Nucleic Acids" by Quintin Anderson (The Seagull Company); Chad Mirkin and Sarah Petrosko (Northwestern University).

Becker's Spine Review
Biggest Avenues for 2014 Spine Industry Growth: MIS, Biologics & More

Nader Dahdaleh, MD, Northwestern Medicine Neurosurgeon, Assistant Professor, Department of Neurological Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago: The past two decades have witnessed a variety of technological advancement in [the] spinal surgery industry and the expectation is that this trend and growth will continue. The most important advancement, in my view, is minimally invasive spinal surgery.

05
Fox News
Moderate to high blood pressure at age 18 significantly increases risk for hea

But, according to lead study author Norrina Allen, many of those studies focused only on blood pressure readings taken at a single point in time, among middle-aged or senior populations – groups that already have a high risk for heart disease.

Fox News
Brain rewrites memories to reflect new experiences, study says

Our memory is not like a video camera," lead author Donna Jo Bridge, a postdoctoral fellow in medical social sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine said in a press release. 

Crain's Chicago Business
Physicians: Tenet Healthcare wants you

“It's not just being able to bill at a higher rate — it's things like clinical integration that a lot of payers are willing to pay for, that you can't do alone,” said Dr. Joel Shalowitz, director of the health industry management program at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management.

Med Page Today
Cardiology: Non-valvular Afib

Anti-coagulation, rate and rhythm control, and catheter ablation are all effective treatments for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, according to three leading cardiologists -- Anne Curtis, MD, of the University at Buffalo, Jonathan Halperin, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Bradley Knight, MD, of Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

04
Los Angeles Times
Remembrance or revision? Brain study shows memory misleads

Northwestern University cognitive neuroscientist Donna J. Bridge was testing how memory is either consolidated or altered, by giving 17 subjects a deceptively simple task. They studied the location of dozens of objects briefly flashed at varied locations on a standard computer screen, then were asked to recall the object's original location on a new screen with a different background.

NPR
Higher Blood Pressure At 18 Means Hardening Arteries At 40

"We need to be aware that what happens when we're young adults is going to have an impact," says Norrina Allen, an epidemiologist and the study's lead author.

USA Today
Your brain often edits that trip down memory lane

But new research in the Journal of Neuroscience suggests it's very effective for helping us adapt to our environments, said co-author Joel Voss, a researcher at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

03
The New York Times
As Peanut Allergies Rise, Trying to Determine a Cause

According to an accompanying editorial by Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University, “some studies actually showed that avoiding peanuts during pregnancy increased the risk of a child developing peanut sensitization.”

WTTW (Chicago Tonight)
Chiropractic Neck Manipulations

We discuss the issue with Susan Berger, the journalist who wrote the article and experienced this with a family member, Dr. Yvonne Curran, a neurologist and Assistant Professor in Neurology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, and Gregory Cramer, Professor and Dean of Research at the National University of Health Sciences.

02
NBC 5 Chicago
Living Well: Sunday Feb 2

Clyde Yancy, MD, chief of cardiology and associate director of the Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute, is interviewed on NBC Chicago on heart health.

Living Healthy Chicago
Protecting Your Bones

“The process of osteoporosis is essentially … where the bone is eating up old bone faster than it’s laying down new bone,” Amisha Wallia, Debbie’s physician at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, says. 

31
The Weather Channel
Concussions and Cold Weather: Do Plunging Temperatures Make Head Injuries More

With the Super Bowl kicking off Sunday night, Dr. Andrew Naidech, M.D. of Neurology at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, says no evidence has been found to suggest colder weather creates a higher risk for a concussion.

Huffington Post
How Does Turkey Look From the U.S.?

"...Turkey is up for a big challenge. Erdogan is dragging the whole country with him as he is destined for an awful political ending. Will the country follow him or raise again from the ashes?" Dr. Hande Ozdinler indicated to me in our interview.

30
U.S. News & World Report
Patients May Have to Compete With Computers for Doctors' Attention

"When doctors spend that much time looking at the computer, it can be difficult for patients to get their attention," study first author Enid Montague, an assistant professor in medicine, general internal medicine and geriatrics at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, said in a university news release.

Becker's Spine Review
5 Spine Surgeons Weigh In on The Most Challenging Aspects of PPACA Roll Out

Alpesh Patel, MD, Associate Professor in Orthopedic Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago: With the rise of insurance coverage, we will see a growth in demand for spine care. 

29
Huffington Post
10 Ways To Prevent Sleep-Related Weight Gain

Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia or CBT-I is considered the gold standard for insomnia treatment, the method with the most scientific evidence to support it, says Kelly Glazer Baron, Ph.D., M.P.H, a sleep researcher and neurology instructor at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

28
MarketWatch (The Wall Street Journal)
Why your doctor should put down the iPad

“That’s time that they’re not engaging with the patient,” says Enid Montague, lead author of the study and an assistant professor in medicine and engineering at Northwestern University

WBBM-AM
Doctors: Winter Can Be Depressing, But Rarely Seriously

Dr. Pedro Dago, head of the psychiatric emergency room at Northwestern Memorial Hospital said those people who do struggle with the extreme cold frequently have issues with how disruptive it is.

CNN.com
Why it's still a big deal if your teen smokes pot

"Adolescence is a sensitive time for brain development," says Matthew J. Smith, a research assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

WHBF-TV
Cold weather health issues

"It is serious. I think most people take into consideration heat-related issues. Cold issues are just as significant," says Dr. George Champas from Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

Outpatient Surgery Magazine
Yes, High-Volume Hip and Knee Hospitals Also Have Highest Readmissions

But James Saucedo, lead author of a Northwestern University study that found that inconsistent record-keeping is often a factor in such data, told the Inquirer that busy urban hospitals may not have time to record all comorbidities.

Science Codex
Impact of battlefield-related genitourinary injuries described in Journal of M

The article is coauthored by Justin Han, MD and Chris Gonzalez, MD, MBA, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Jesse Brown Veterans Affairs Medical Center (Chicago, IL), and Mark Edney, MD, Peninsula Urology Associates (Salisbury, MD) and Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army Reserve, 48th Combat Support Hospital (Ft. Meade, MD).

27
Huffington Post
Electronic Health Records May Make Doctors Bad At Patient Eye Contact

And "when doctors spend that much time looking at the computer, it can be difficult for patients to get their attention," study researcher Enid Montague, an assistant professor in medicine, general internal medicine and geriatrics at Northwestern's Feinberg School of Medicine, explained in a statement. "It's likely that the ability to listen, problem-solve and think creatively is not optimal when physicians' eyes are glued to the screen."

Drugs.com
Medac Pharma, Inc. Secures FDA Acceptance of a New Drug Application (NDA) for

Rheumatologist Eric Ruderman, MDProfessor of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, remarked, “As we work to manage our patients with a wide-range of immunological disorders, it is enormously helpful to have additional effective treatment options that can enhance their quality of life.”

24
Los Angeles Times
Soak your cares away -- it's terrific and scientific

"I love the concept of aromatherapy," says Dr. Peter Lio, clinical assistant professor in dermatology and pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and co-founder of the Chicago Integrative Eczema Center. 

WBEZ.org (Chicago's NPR affiliate)
Physicians say U.S. ERs don't make the grade

When it comes to emergency room care, the U.S. may not have the best system. According to the U.S. College of Emergency Physicians, our emergency care is abysmal; it gave a grade of D+ recently. Dr. Rahul Khare, Assistant Director of Emergency Room Operations at Northwestern University Hospital, talks about the problems plaguing the system and what needs to be done to raise the grade.

Huffington Post
Healthy in 2013, Intuitively Cancer Aware in 2014

The fact is, ladies, one third of all American women will have to have their uterus removed and half a million in the U.S. will have hysterectomies each year, according to Lauren Streicher, MD, Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago and author of The Essential Guide to Hysterectomy: Advice from a Gynecologist on Your Choices Before, During, and After Surgery.

Science Codex
Do doctors spend too much time looking at computer screen?

"When doctors spend that much time looking at the computer, it can be difficult for patients to get their attention," said Enid Montague, first author of the study. 

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