Media Coverage

15
The New York Times
F.D.A. Approves Amgen Drug to Treat Heart Failure

Amgen’s drug will be for “a niche of patients, potentially small, compared to a full cohort of patients who will be immediate candidates for LCZ696,” Dr. Clyde W. Yancy, chief of the cardiology division at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, wrote in an email.

Crain's Chicago Business
Northwestern alums pledge more than $10 million to school

Muneer Satter and his wife, Kristen Hertel, have committed to donate $10.5 million to Northwestern University, most of it for medical school scholarships.

US News & World Report
When Men Get the Baby Blues

Men with histories of mental health conditions are at higher risk for depression after becoming a father, but for some new dads, “that lack of sleep and lack of control and lack of a routine is enough to just kind of tip them into a depression,” says Dr. Craig Garfield, an associate professor in pediatrics and medical social sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, who led the Pediatrics study on depressive symptoms.

14
Chicago Tribune
Northwestern schedules service for neurological surgery chair Parsa

Northwestern University  will hold a memorial service Friday for Dr. Andrew Parsa, the neurological surgery chairman at the Feinberg School of Medicine who died suddenly Monday, a university spokeswoman said Tuesday.

Chicago Tribune
Northwestern study uses technology to target baseball elbow injuries

Two Northwestern University biomedical engineers have taken a new approach to one of the most confounding injuries in professional sports, using digital tools to study the way baseball pitchers, especially hard-throwing big-leaguers, keep destroying their elbows.

Chicago Sun-Times
Brain surgeon Dr. Andrew Parsa dies at 48

Dr. Parsa, the chair of neurological surgery at the Feinberg School of Medicine and Northwestern Memorial Hospital, died unexpectedly Monday at his Lincoln Park home, relatives said.

13
Chicago Tribune
Feinberg neurological surgery chief Andrew Parsa

Dr. Andrew Parsa, chairman of neurological surgery at  Northwestern University's  Feinberg School of Medicine, died suddenly Monday morning, according to school officials and the Cook County medical examiner's office.

The Huffington Post
Cholesterol: Dietary Confusion or Healthy Conclusion?

Linda Van Horn, Ph.D., is a registered dietitian and professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

12
The Wall Street Journal
Aleppo Diary: The Carnage From Syrian Barrel Bombs

Dr. Attar is an assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

09
Fox News (National)
4 skin conditions that can signal other health problems

In many cases, skin conditions are linked to processes occurring throughout the body, and this means they can become risk factors that set you up for other types of illness or injury, said Dr. Jonathan Silverberg, assistant professor of dermatology at Northwestern University.

08
Chicago Tribune
Worry Knot, iCope and a suite of IntelliCare apps from Northwestern

A team at Northwestern University ’s Feinberg School of Medicine is hoping a just-launched suite of mobile apps will help people with depression and anxiety disorders.

Yahoo! Beauty
4 Skin Conditions That Can Signal Other Health Problems

In many cases, skin conditions are linked to processes occurring throughout the body, and this means they can become risk factors that set you up for other types of illness or injury, says Jonathan Silverberg, MD, assistant professor of dermatology at Northwestern University.

06
The New York Times
New Thinking on Sinus Infections

Many sinusitis sufferers also have allergies, said Anju Peters, an associate professor of medicine in the division of allergy and immunology at Northwestern University in Chicago.

05
Yahoo! Beauty
Can Light Improve Your Workout?

What we do know: “Light is a very, very powerful signal to the brain,” says Phyllis Zee, M.D., associate director of the Center for Sleep & Circadian Biology at Northwestern University.

02
Examiner
Many childhood cancer survivors battle health problems as adults

“Amazing strides have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of childhood cancers, which I think the data from this study highlight,” lead researcher Siobhan M. Phillips, PhD, MPH, an assistant professor of preventive medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, told Medical Daily.

01
Yahoo
Questions persist about sexual effects of baldness drug

The findings raise serious questions about whether the drug -- known as finasteride and marketed as Propecia and Proscar, among other names -- is safe, said the report by scientists at Northwestern University, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Dermatology on Wednesday.

Science World Report
Whiplash Injuries Come With Chronic Pain: Scientists Try To Identify Problems

Researchers at Northwestern Medicine have now identified that for many who will recover from whiplash injuries, about 25 percent of them will still deal with long-term pain and disability issues for months or years to come.

WebMD
More Survive Child Cancer; Health Problems Persist

However, when you look at the age of these survivors, the magnitude of these conditions at relatively young ages is quite striking," said lead researcher Siobhan Phillips, an assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

27
NBC News (National)
U.S.-Russian Crew Moves Into Space Station for Yearlong Mission

In fact, Northwestern University biologist Fred Turek said Scott Kelly's schedule for the next year has been laid out in detail, right down to the time required to collect the fecal samples for Turek's study of gut bacteria.

The Daily Beast
Which Vaccines Should You Get as an Adult?

“When we start having people refuse to be immunized, then these illnesses can start to have a resurgence in the population,” says Dr. David Zich assistant professor of emergency medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Good Housekeeping
High Blood Pressure-Related Deaths Are Increasing at a Terrifying Rate

"The lens has to increase now," Clyde Yancy, chief of the division of cardiology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, told Time.

26
TIME Magazine
High Blood Pressure Related Deaths Are Way Up, National Data Shows

“In the areas we’ve been focusing on for the last two to three decades we really have seen a reduction in deaths,” says Dr. Clyde Yancy chief of the division of cardiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

Chicago Tribune
Review: 'Galileo's Middle Finger' by Alice Dreger

In that instance, Dreger was vilified for her analysis of a controversy over a book by Northwestern University Professor J. Michael Bailey, the author of "The Man Who Would Be Queen." Dreger, a professor at Northwestern's Feinberg School of Medicine, did not know Bailey before she began research on his work.

BBC
Galileo's Middle Finger

Anatomy, identity, intersex. Medical historian/ethicist Alice Dreger (Northwestern) and Kelly Hills discuss Dreger's new book, Galileo's Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and the Search for Justice in Science.

Nature
Astronaut twins study raises questions about genetic privacy

By having a genetically identical twin on the ground, and taking samples over a long period of time, “that gives us a lot more power”, says Martha Vitaterna, a neurobiologist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.

25
Yahoo! News
A Year in Space: The Science Behind the Epic Space Station Voyage

Researchers are planning to collect samples from the Kelly brothers during and after Scott's flight to compare the microbes living in their gastrointestinal tracts, according to Northwestern University, one of the schools aiding in the twin science.

19
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Dad's Depression Affects Toddler's Behavior, Too

"Fathers' emotions affect their children," study author Sheehan Fisher, an instructor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, said in a university news release.

Windy City Live
Brain tumor breakthroughs at Northwestern

Dr. Andrew Parsa, neurosurgeon at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, is creating a vaccine from the tumor itself to help the immune system target and suppress the cancer.

17
U.S. News & World Report
Kids' Bad Diets May Mean Worse Health as Adults

Northwestern University researchers found that while most of the nearly 9,000 children they studied had healthy blood pressure levels, 40 percent did not have good cholesterol levels, almost none ate a healthy diet regularly and 30 percent were overweight or obese.

15
The New York Times
Studies Boost Hopes for New Class of Cholesterol Medicines

Two other heart experts — Drs. Neil Stone and Daniel Lloyd-Jones of Northwestern University in Chicago — wrote in the medical journal that "it would be premature to endorse these drugs for widespread use" until the definitive studies are done in a couple of years.

The Washington Post
Studies boost hopes for new class of cholesterol medicines

Two other heart experts — Drs. Neil Stone and Daniel Lloyd-Jones of Northwestern University in Chicago — wrote in the medical journal that “it would be premature to endorse these drugs for widespread use” until the definitive studies are done in a couple of years.

12
TIME Magazine
Teen Pot Smokers Have More Memory Damage, Study Says

In the new research, published in the journal Hippocampus, researchers at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine looked at 97 people and found that those who smoked marijuana every day for about three years performed worse on long-term memory assessments.

US News & World Report
Teens' Heavy Pot Smoking Tied to Memory Problems

Daily marijuana use also linked to brain abnormalities, study finds

Fox News (National)
Frequent marijuana use associated with long-term memory loss

Those who smoked did so for three years, and more than 80 percent of the smoking group reported using marijuana every day, said lead study author Matthew J. Smith, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Yahoo! Health
‘SuperAgers’ In Their Late 80s Share Their Stay-Sharp Secrets

With funding from the National Institute on Aging and the Davee Foundation, Emily J Rogalski, Ph.D., and a team at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine have found a select group of people whose brains simply don’t appear to suffer that ravishes of time that researchers many times see.      

CBS News
Marijuana may smoke your long-term memory

"We can't know that it's causing the memory impairment," said Smith, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago.

Chicago Sun-Times
Smoking pot as a teen affects memory: study

Young adults who were heavy pot smokers as teens performed about 18 percent worse on long-term memory tests than those who never “abused cannabis,” Northwestern University researchers have found.

Health Day
Teens' Heavy Pot Smoking Tied to Memory Problems

"We can't know that it's causing the memory impairment," said Smith, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago.

Nature World News
Marijuana Use May Lead to Poor Long-Term Memory

But researchers from Northwestern University are among the first to not only find that the hippocampus is abnormally shaped in heavy marijuana users - those who smoke it daily for about three years - but that it is also directly related to poor long-term memory performance.

10
NPR
Circadian Surprise: How Our Body Clocks Help Shape Our Waistlines

"Yes, there are clocks in all the cells of your body," explains Fred Turek, a circadian scientist at Northwestern University.
 

US News
U.S. News Releases 2016 Best Graduate Schools Ranking

Among part-time MBA programs, the University of California—Berkeley's Haas School of Business again took the No. 1 spot, followed by the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago in second place and the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in third.

Chicago Tribune
U.S. News names best grad schools for business, law, engineering

The  University of Chicago , Northwestern and Illinois have some of the best graduate schools in the nation for business, law and engineering, according to a U.S. News and World Report list released Tuesday.

Crain's Chicago Business
See how Chicago's grad schools rank on U.S. News list

MBA programs at the University of Chicago's Booth School of Business and Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management repeated at No. 4 and No. 6, respectively, on U.S. News & World Report's latest rankings of graduate education, released today.

Chicago Sun-Times
University of Chicago, Northwestern retain top U.S. News graduate-school ranki

While the University of Chicago and Northwestern University remain at the top of U.S. News & World Report’s latest graduate-school rankings, the University of Illinois makes its mark for nursing and education, according to 2016 results to be published Tuesday.

05
The New York Times
Couple Offers $92M to Northwestern University Medical School

Northwestern University's medical school has received a $92 million donation to pursue regenerative medicine.

Associated Press
Couple offers $92M to Northwestern University medical school

Northwestern University's medical school has received a $92 million donation to pursue regenerative medicine.

The Washington Post
Couple offers $92M to Northwestern University medical school

Northwestern University’s medical school has received a $92 million donation to pursue regenerative medicine.

ABC News
Couple Offers $92M to Northwestern University Medical School

Northwestern University's medical school has received a $92 million donation to pursue regenerative medicine.

Fox News (National)
Northwestern University's medical school gets $92 million donation

Northwestern University's medical school has received a $92 million donation to pursue regenerative medicine.

Chicago Tribune
Northwestern University receives $92 million gift

Northwestern alumnus Louis Simpson and his wife, Kimberly Querrey, have given $92 million to support biomedical research programs, in particular regenerative medicine.

Crain's Chicago Business
Florida couple with deep ties to Northwestern donate $92 million

Northwestern University trustee and alumnus Louis Simpson and his wife, businesswoman Kimberly Querrey, have donated $92 million to Northwestern University to support biomedical research at Feinberg School of Medicine.

NBC Chicago
Couple Offers $92M to Northwestern Medical School

Northwestern University's medical school has received a $92 million donation to pursue regenerative medicine.

Boston NPR
Medication And Female Moods

Dr. Crystal Clark, psychiatrist and professor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

04
NPR
People With Eczema Are Itching For Better Health Care

Dr. Jonathan Silverberg, a dermatologist at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, noticed that many of his patients were frustrated with their options, and wanted to figure out why.

Health Day
Medical Bills Another Burden for Eczema Patients: Study

Researchers at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago report that adults with eczema have higher health costs and more health care-related problems than those without the skin condition.

03
Fox News (National)
Study suggests benefits of more heart care for young adults

The latest guidelines from the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology encourage doctors to counsel those patients to change their lifestyle, but not to take a cholesterol-lowering statin drug unless they have other risk factors, such as a family history of a heart attack at a relatively young age, said Neil Stone, a professor of cardiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and lead author of the guidelines.

WGN-TV
What brains are teaching us about Alzheimer’s

It’s just one of the hundreds of human specimens at Northwestern Medicine’s brain bank.

02
TIME Magazine
Alzheimer's Proteins Appear in 20 Year Olds

In a report published in the journal Brain, Changiz Geula, a professor at the Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, reveals that the protein—which gradually builds up and forms sticky plaques in the brain in Alzheimer’s disease—starts appearing early in life.

The Wall Street Journal
Focus More Heart Care on the Young, Study Says

The latest guidelines from the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology encourage doctors to counsel those patients to change their lifestyle, but not to take a cholesterol-lowering statin drug unless they have other risk factors, such as a family history of a heart attack at a relatively young age, said Neil Stone, a professor of cardiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and lead author of the guidelines.

Yahoo! Health
Early Signs Of Alzheimer's Disease Found In Patients As Young As 20

Alzheimer’s disease may not be just for grandparents to worry about: Groundbreaking new research from Northwestern University has found that amyloid protein — a hallmark of the devastating disease — starts accumulating in brain neurons of people as young as 20 years old.

Nature World
A Hallmark of Alzheimer's Can Show Up In Young People Too

It's long been known that amyloid accumulates and forms clumps of plaque outside neurons in aging adults and in Alzheimer's patients, but "discovering that amyloid begins to accumulate so early in life is unprecedented," lead investigator Changiz Geula, a researcher at the Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center at Northwestern University, said in a statement.

Health Day
Brain Protein Tied to Alzheimer's Spotted in Young Adults

"One thing this means is that the resource, the machinery, for making the clumps of plaque we see among Alzheimer's patients is already available in young individuals," said study co-author Changiz Geula, a research professor at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Los Angeles Times
Changes linked to Alzheimer's disease evident even in young brains

"What this suggests is that Alzheimer's disease is truly a lifelong process," said the study's lead author, Changiz Geula, a neuroscientist with the Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

WebMD
Protein Tied to Alzheimer's Found in Young Adults

"One thing this means is that the resource, the machinery, for making the clumps of plaque we see among Alzheimer's patients is already available in young individuals," said study co-author Changiz Geula, a research professor at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

01
Fox News (National)
Melasma: How to cope with skin discoloration during pregnancy

“It’s significantly less common to have pigmentation in other areas of the body, ” said Dr. Bethanee Schlosser, a board certified dermatologist and assistant professor in the department of dermatology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, IL.

25
The Atlantic
One Tasty Trick to Fix Your Baby

“I’m kind of slapping myself on the wrist,” Ruchi Gupta, a pediatrician at Northwestern University, told The New York Times, lamenting withholding peanuts from her own baby daughter, who later tested positive for a peanut allergy.

The Huffington Post
Save Money, Save Lives: Why the Silence on the Fiscal and Fatal

Elisa Gordon, Ph.D., M.P.H. is Associate Professor in the Comprehensive Transplant Center at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a fellow with The OpEd Project's Public Voices Fellowship at Northwestern.

24
WTTW
New Dietary Guidelines: What's In, What's Out?

We discuss the recent changes in dietary guidelines and how they affect the way we're supposed to eat with Dr. Nirav Shah, director of the Illinois Department of Public Health, and Dr. Neil Stone from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

JAMA
Efforts Seek to Develop Systematic Ways to Objectively Assess Surgeons’ Skills

“Current assessment of operative skills is based partly on the numbers of procedures that residents participate in without establishing their level of involvement and performance in the case,” said Jonathan Fryer, MD, a professor of surgery and transplantation at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago. “Faculty assessment of a resident’s overall surgical performance is commonly done remotely when memory decay can be a major factor.”

23
The New York Times
Feeding Infants Peanut Products Could Prevent Allergies, Study Suggests

Whether infants should be fed peanuts and other foods associated with allergies is one of the most common questions parents ask about introducing solid foods to their children, said Dr. Ruchi Gupta, associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University, who was not involved in the study.

22
Chicago Sun-Times
Doctors in the medical pot business can't recommend their patients use it

“We don’t like doctors prescribing or directing patients to taking therapies they’re making money on,” said Laurie Zoloth a professor of bioethics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

21
Forbes
What Makes A "SuperAger"?

We applaud Northwestern University for its work and hope we can all learn from the superagers we’d like to become ourselves.

20
Chicago Tribune
Illinois hospitals in line for more money from Obamacare

Dr. Lee Lindquist from Northwestern University said patient input has been key in directing what questions she's asking from the early stages of her research. Lindquist received about $1.8 million to develop an online tool that will encourage more adult children and their parents to plan ahead for later-life care.

WBEZ
SuperAger Brains

In 2007 researchers at Northwestern’s Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center identified a group of people they dubbed “Cognitive SuperAgers.” They’re folks whose minds and memories stay sharp well into their 80s. Late last month a group of SuperAger researchers at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine published a study detailing the physical similarities of these brains. Changiz Geula, the study’s senior author and a research professor at the Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center, talks to us about it.

Huffington Post
The Benefits Of Eating Small, Frequent Meals

Researchers in the UK, at Imperial College London, and in the U.S., at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago, analyzed data from 2,385 adults from a study conducted between 1996 and 1999.

Fast Company
I am Addicted to Sleeping Pills (And My Doctors is Fine With That)

On a nightly basis, the millions of us taking a pill are mostly likely fighting a lot of the behavioral foundations for good sleep. Some of this can be managed, for instance, by not checking emails after 8 p.m., but because women report a higher sleep disturbance than men for biological reasons or depression or menopause, explains Kelly Glazer Baron, a sleep researcher and neurology instructor at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, the process takes more work.

19
Chicago Tribune
Losing weight before pregnancy is healthier for mom, baby

"One way we've learned this is by studying babies born to moms before and after gastric bypass surgery," said Dr. Lisa Neff, an endocrinologist at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago. "The babies born after their moms lost weight have fewer problems associated with obesity themselves."

The Huffington Post
Research Suggests Kids Over 2 Shouldn't Nap - But There's More To It

"There's a lot that we still need to understand about the impact [of napping] on health. The only consistent finding was that children above the age of 2 who don't nap do fall asleep more easily and sleep more consistently throughout the night," Kelly Glazer Baron, an assistant professor of neurology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, told The Huffington Post. (Baron did not work on the new review.)

16
The Washington Post
Heart attack ‘risk calculators’ miss mark, researchers say

Blaha acknowledged that the authors of the new guidelines had anticipated that their calculations would need validation and possibly changes. But the paper nevertheless brought a terse response from two of the officials who helped write the new American Heart Association guidelines. “The overall findings are not news at all,” Donald Lloyd-Jones, chairman of the department of preventive medicine at the Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine and a member of the committee that developed the recommendations wrote on the Heart Association’s Web site. “We actually did much of this exercise ourselves in the guideline document.”

13
NBC News (National)
SuperAgers' Brains May Hold Key To Maintaining Memories

"Now we know that [this brain region] is thicker in SuperAgers than those even two or three decades younger," said study co-author Changiz Geula, a research professor of neuroscience at the Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center at Northwestern University.

The Washington Post
What Brian Williams case may teach about false memories

“Our research shows that memories change over time to reframe and edit events to create a story that fits a person’s current world,” said Joel Voss, an assistant professor of neurology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

WebMD
'Superagers' Seem to Have Younger Brains

"The brains of the superagers are either wired differently or have structural differences when compared to normal individuals of the same age," study senior author Changiz Geula, a research professor at Northwestern's Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's DiseaseCenter in Chicago, said in a university news release.

12
The New York Times
Studying Oversize Brain Cells for Links to Exceptional Memory

In 2010, a graduate student named Tamar Gefen got to know a remarkable group of older people.

They had volunteered for a study of memory at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University. Although they were all over age 80, Ms. Gefen and her colleagues found that they scored as well on memory tests as people in their 50s. Some complained that they remembered too much.

WGN TV
Option to freeze fertility gives cancer patients hope

The ovary is then carried over to Northwestern Memorial Hospital, where, if the patient chooses, it’s divided.

09
WBEZ
Who needs an adult measles booster shot?

Lurie Children’s Hospital pediatric infectious disease specialist Dr. Tina Tan said it’s also important for adults, especially those in contact with children, to know if they got two doses of the vaccine.  

“If you have an adult person who is worried about measles and doesn’t know whether or not they’ve received two doses of the vaccine, they should see their physician,” Tan said. “If for some reason they are not able to find out if they got two doses it's not going to hurt them to get a booster dose to protect themselves.”

06
ABC News (National)
Teens Use #ShovelItForward to Help Neighbors in Need

Additionally, people will sometimes try to clear heavy snow quickly, leading to overexertion, according to Dr. Clyde Yancy, chief of cardiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

05
Reuters
Patient ratings not linked to cancer surgery outcomes

“My argument is they don’t need to correlate,” said Dr. Karl Bilimoria of the Surgical Outcomes and Quality Improvement Center and department of surgery at Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago. 

04
Fox 32 Chicago
Vaccinations Stir Up Debate Among Parents Politicians and Doctors

More than 100 measles cases this year and it's only January. That has sparked a raging debate from suburban daycares all the way to Capitol Hill and into the race for the next president. Pediatrician Susan Sheinkp explains more.

ABC News (National)
How the Brains of 'SuperAgers' Are Different

“The brains of the SuperAgers are either wired differently or have structural differences when compared to normal individuals of the same age,” Changiz Geula, a study senior author and a research professor at the Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center, said in a prepared statement. “It may be one factor, such as expression of a specific gene, or a combination of factors that offers protection.”

03
ABC News (Associated Press)
Infections Most Common Cause of Readmissions After Surgery

"Most of these things are clearly related to the surgery, well-known accepted complications that we all try to reduce," said Dr. Karl Bilimoria, the study's senior author and director of the surgical quality improvement center at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

Washington Post
Infections most common cause of readmissions after surgery

“Most of these things are clearly related to the surgery, well-known accepted complications that we all try to reduce,” said Dr. Karl Bilimoria, the study’s senior author and director of the surgical quality improvement center at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

U.S. News & World Report
Infection Most Likely Cause of Hospital Readmission After Surgery

The number one complication leading to readmission was surgical wound infection, said lead researcher Dr. Karl Bilimoria, an assistant professor of surgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Boston Globe
Infections most common cause of readmissions after surgery

‘‘Most of these things are clearly related to the surgery, well-known accepted complications that we all try to reduce,’’ said Dr. Karl Bilimoria, the study’s senior author and director of the surgical quality improvement center at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

WebMD
Infection Likely Cause of Post-Surgery Readmission

The number one complication leading to readmission was surgical wound infection, said lead researcher Dr. Karl Bilimoria, an assistant professor of surgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

01
The Washington Post
Want to prevent thousands of deaths a year? Make doctors and nurses meditate.

My research group at the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine at Northwestern University has been investigating whether these positive impacts could improve doctor and nurse decision-making and quality of care, thereby improving patient safety and outcome

Chicago Tribune
Random Acts of Flowers brings smiles to Chicago hospitals, senior centers

The flowers are recycled by volunteers like Palivos and delivered to residents at hospitals, senior care facilities and hospice centers. The patients often have never received flowers. The Chicago branch, which opened Tuesday, currently serves 14 facilities, including Covenant Home of Chicago, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Waterford Nursing Home and Rehabilitation Centre and Sunrise of Wilmette.

NBC Chicago
7 Tips To Stay Safe While Shoveling

“Shoveling snow is hard work and puts a great deal of stress on the heart,” said R. Kannan Mutharasan, MD, co-medical director of Northwestern Memorial Hospital’s Sports Cardiology Program, during last year's Polar Vortex. “Chicago gets an average of 38 inches of snow each winter, and shoveling is a strenuous activity that can greatly increase blood pressure and heart rate. This puts a lot of strain on the heart, and can even lead to a heart attack. We want everyone picking up a shovel to do so safely.”

30
Fox News (National)
New fund eases expenses for organ donors

“It rings a little close to payment for organs,” said Dr. Talia Baker, a Northwestern University transplant surgeon. “It makes me a little uncomfortable.”

The Huffington Post
Making Friends Online Could Help You Lose Weight

A new Northwestern University study published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface found that those who actively engage in such online communities lost a higher percentage of their body weight compared to users who participated sparingly.

29
Reuters
It does get better for LGBT and questioning youth

“I think we should be very happy that it does get better, but I think it’s important not to forget victimization is important and happens very early,” said Michelle Birkett, the study’s lead author. “It’s not good enough to just wait. It should be tackled early on so kids don’t have to experience it.”

Huffington Post
Study Finds It Does Get Better For LGBTQ Youth

"I want it to get better sooner," said Birkett, a research scientist at the IMPACT LGBT Health and Development Program of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

The Huffington Post
Midlife Matters: Menopause, Sexuality and Women's Health

I'm so proud of the panel of A-list experts we've assembled. One of them is Lauren Streicher, MD, a sexologist from Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago.

WGN Radio
Dr. Robert L. Murphy: The growing Measles problem

Bill and Wendy talk with Dr. Robert L. Murphy, of the Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, about the growing Measles problem.

27
U.S. News & World Report
Watch Upper Number on Blood Pressure for Younger Adults: Study

"High blood pressure becomes increasingly common with age. However, it does occur in younger adults, and we are seeing early onset more often recently as a result of the obesity epidemic," said study senior author Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones. He is a professor of epidemiology and cardiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

WebMD
Upper Blood Pressure Number and Younger Adults

"High blood pressure becomes increasingly common with age. However, it does occur in younger adults, and we are seeing early onset more often recently as a result of the obesity epidemic," said study senior author Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones. He is a professor of epidemiology and cardiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

23
Chicago Tribune
Cancer and bad luck

Dr. Leonidas Platanias, director of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, tells us: "The fact that (the Hopkins authors) attribute certain tumors to random mutations doesn't absolutely exclude environmental or other factors that we have not well defined and may be contributing."

Yahoo! News
Portable X-ray services becoming more common

Dr. James C. Carr, a professor of radiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, believes trained technicians using portable machines can provide quality scans for patients in rural areas or unable to move.

WebMD
Eczema Linked to Other Health Problems

"Eczema is not just skin deep," said lead researcher Dr. Jonathan Silverberg, an assistant professor of dermatology at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

The Philadelphia Inquirer
Family Stories May Help Coma Patients Recover

"We believe hearing those stories in parents' and siblings' voices exercises the circuits in the brain responsible for long-term memories," study author Theresa Pape, a neuroscientist in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Northwestern University's School of Medicine in Chicago, said in a university news release.

New York Daily News
Old family yarns help coma patients recover: study

Traumatic brain injury patients who listened to recordings of family members vividly retelling old tales four times a day for six weeks saw a boost in neural activity, Northwestern University researchers discovered. 

22
CBS News (National)
New study reveals healing power of voices

In a groundbreaking Northwestern Medicine and Hines VA Hospital clinical study, Pape performed brain scans on 15 coma patients, including Godfrey. The results of that study, released Thursday, show that when patients heard unfamiliar voices, brain scans showed little activity, but when they heard close relatives calling out their names or talking, the scans lit up.

21
Huffington Post
Why Your Fitness App Isn't Helping You Get Healthier

"Behavior change techniques are the tools that have emerged out of decades-old research on behavior change which have shown some level of effectiveness at helping people to modify their behavior," said David Conroy, the study's lead researcher from Northwestern University in Chicago.

20
U.S. News & World Report
Postpartum Anxiety or Normal New Mom Fears?

There might also be physiological explanations for mood disorders during and after birth, says Emily S. Miller, an assistant professor of Maternal Fetal Medicine at Northwestern University.

19
Chicago Tonight
Good Buddies

As baby boomers age, the rate of Alzheimer's disease climbs steadily. The Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center at Northwestern's Feinberg School of Medicine runs The Buddy Program which pairs Alzheimer's patients in the early stages of the disease with first-year medical students. The goal is to add a human dimension to the students' scientific and clinical studies. 

16
Yahoo! News
Eczema Linked To Surprising Health Risks

That’s part of why we see all these negative behaviors,” says Jonathan Silverberg, M.D., lead study author and assistant professor of dermatology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

15
Chicago Tribune
Booking a trip to the ER on your smartphone? It's a breeze

At Northwestern Lake Forest Hospital outside Chicago, assistant ER director Dr. Steve Edelstein says ER Express sends about 40 patients a month to his ER and the hospital's nearby Grayslake Emergency Center. A quarter are new patients, and he says those tech-savvy customers "are generally more likely to have credit cards and good insurance" than others.

NPR
Even Small Changes Made Midlife Can Help Keep Your Heart Healthy

Bonnie Spring, a health psychologist and the director of the Center for Behavior and Health at Northwestern University in Chicago, has conducted a study showing that even moderate habit changes in adulthood can significantly protect against heart disease later in life.

14
The Huffington Post
7 Surprising Causes Of High Blood Pressure

“The best data demonstrates that hypertension is almost unavoidable as we age,” says Clyde Yancy, MD, chief of cardiology and associate director of the Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute in Chicago, Illinois. “Once we reach age 55, we have a 90 percent chance of becoming hypertensive."

The Huffington Post
13 Reasons Every Woman Should Masturbate

The Huffington Post spoke with Dr. Lauren Streicher, an Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Northwestern University, about the health benefits of masturbation.

10
The New York Times
Indoor Tanning Poses Cancer Risks, Teenagers Learn

Indoor tanning exploded in popularity in the United States in the 1980s and 1990s. Dr. June K. Robinson, a professor of dermatology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, remembers being handed a bright orange flier for free tans in downtown Chicago in the early 1980s.

PBS
Study: Optimists twice as likely as pessimists to have healthy hearts

Between 2002 and 2004, Hernandez and fellow researchers from Northwestern University, Chapman University, Harvard University and Drexel University, examined the relationship between optimism and cardiovascular health in more than 5,100 adults aged 52 to 84.

09
U.S. News & World Report
What to Do When Your Birth Control Fails

It depends on which type of IUD you have, says Alexander Lin, an assistant professor at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Chicago Tribune
Study: Pop music helps ease post-surgery pain for children

Research from Northwestern University and Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago asserts that listening to music and audiobooks is a viable alternative to medication for reducing post-surgery pain in children.

The Huffington Post
Listening To Rihanna Is An Actual Pain Reliever

Dr. Santhanam Suresh, an anesthesiology and pediatrics professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, decided to test other ways to distract kids from their pain.

The Huffington Post
Nearly 1 In 5 Women Who Have A Hysterectomy May Not Need It

Dr. Lauren Streicher, an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology with Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine and author of The Essential Guide to Hysterectomy, cautioned that it is possible the women in the study had been presented with the full range of options and that this was simply not reflected in their medical records, which do not always capture a complete picture of the interactions between patients and health care providers.

05
WGN-TV
Northwestern doc discusses groundbreaking cancer research

Director of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University Dr. Leon Platanias joined WGN’s Dina Bair to discuss this research further.

02
Reuters
Eczema associated with osteoporosis-related fractures

“There are a number of reasons why people with eczema may be at higher risk for osteoporosis,” said Dr. Jonathan I. Silverberg of the departments of dermatology, preventive medicine and medical social sciences at Northwestern University in Chicago.

Chicago Tribune
Obesity is not a curable condition

Dr. Robert Kushner, director, Obesity Action Coalition, clinical director, Northwestern Comprehensive Center on Obesity at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago

Chicago Tribune
Ask Tom: Why does cold air make your nose run?

Dr. David Conley, associate professor of otolaryngology at Northwestern University, says one of the functions of the human nose is to humidify inhaled air and to humidify itself