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Human Genetics

Research into the genetic basis of human diseases.

Labs in This Area

 Daniel Brat Lab

Mechanisms Underlying Glioblastoma Progression and Regulators of Asymmetric Cellular Division in Glioblastoma Stem Cells

Research Description

Mechanisms Underlying Glioblastoma Progression
We investigate mechanisms of progression to glioblastoma (GBM), the highest grade astrocytoma, including genetics, hypoxia, and angiogenesis. Progression is characterized by tumor necrosis, severe hypoxia and microvascular hyperplasia, a type of angiogenesis. We propose that vaso-occlusion and intravascular thrombosis within a high grade glioma results in hypoxia, necrosis and hypoxia-induced microvascular hyperplasia in the tumor periphery, leading to neoplastic expansion outward. Since the pro-thrombotic protein tissue factor is upregulated in gliomas, we investigate mechanisms of increased expression and pro-coagulant effects.

In Silico Brain Tumor Research
We initiated an In Silico Center for Brain Tumor Research to investigate the molecular correlates of pathologic, radiologic and clinical features of gliomas using pre-existing databases, including as TCGA and Rembrandt. Using datasets and image analysis algorithms, we study whether elements of the tumor micro-environment, such as tumor necrosis, angiogenesis, inflammatory infiltrates and thrombosis, may correlate with gene expression subtypes in TCGA gliomas. We also have demonstrated the clinical relevance of TCGA subclasses within the lower grade gliomas using the Rembrandt dataset.

Regulators of Asymmetric Cellular Division in Glioblastoma Stem Cells
We study mechanisms that confer specialized biologic properties to glioma stem cells (GSC) in GBM. The Drosophila brain tumor (brat) gene normally regulates asymmetric cellular division and neural progenitor differentiation in the CNS of flies and, when mutated, leads to a massive brain containing only neuroblastic cells with tumor-like properties. We study the human homolog of Drosophila brat, Trim3, for its role in regulating asymmetric cell division and stem-like properties in GSCs. Trim3 may elicit its effects is through repression of c-Myc.

For more information, visit the faculty profile of Daniel Brat, MD, PhD or the Brat Lab website.

Publications

See Dr. Brat's publications in PubMed.

Contact

Email Dr. Brat

 Serdar Bulun Lab

Estrogen metabolism in breast cancer, endometriosis and uterine fibroids.

Research Description

The laboratory research of Serdar E. Bulun, MD, focuses on studying estrogen biosynthesis and metabolism, in particular aromatase expression, in hormone-dependent human diseases such as breast cancer, endometriosis and uterine fibroids.

A team of investigators works on understanding the epithelial-stromal interactions and aromatase overexpression in breast cancer tissue. Because aromatase inhibitors treat breast tumors primarily via suppressing intratumoral estrogen biosynthesis, these efforts are important for discovering new targets of treatment.

Another team studies endometriosis. Basic data from this laboratory led to the introduction of aromatase inhibitors into endometriosis treatment. Human tissues and a primate model are used to elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of endometriosis.

Regulation of aromatase expression is also studied in uterine fibroids, benign tumors that are dependent on estrogen for growth, by a third team. 

A fourth team is investigating the link between progesterone action and estrogen inactivation in normal endometrium and endometriosis.

Lastly, a fifth team has identified novel mutations that cause familial excessive estrogen formation syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by short stature, gynecomastia and hypogonadism in males and early breast development and irregular menses in females. In this syndrome, heterozygous inversions in chromosome 15q21, which cause the coding region of the aromatase gene to lie adjacent to constitutively active cryptic promoters that normally transcribe other genes, result in estrogen excess owing to the overexpression of aromatase in many tissues.

For more information, please see Dr. Bulun's faculty profile.

Publications

See Dr. Bulun's publications in PubMed.

Contact

Dr. Bulun

 Paul Burridge Lab

Investigating the application of human induced pluripotent stem cells to study the pharmacogenomics of chemotherapy off-target toxicity and efficacy

Research Description

The Burridge lab studies the role of the genome in influencing drug responses, known as pharmacogenomics or personalized medicine. Our major model is human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC), generated from patient's blood or skin. We use a combination of next generation sequencing, automation and robotics, high-throughput drug screening, high-content imaging, tissue engineering, electrophysiological and physiological testing to better understand the mechanisms of drug response and action.

Our major effort has been related to patient-specific responses to chemotherapy agents. We ask the question: what is the genetic reason why some patients have a minimal side effects to their cancer treatment, whilst others have encounter highly detrimental side-effects? These side-effects  can include cardiomyopathy (heart failure or arrhythmias), peripheral neuropathy,  or hepatotoxicity (liver failure). It is our aim to add to risk-based screening by functionally validating genetic changes that predispose a patient to a specific drug response.

Recent Findings

  • Human induced pluripotent stem cells predict breast cancer patients’ predilection to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity
  • Chemically defined generation of human cardiomyocytes

Current Projects

  • Modeling the role of the genome in doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity using hiPSC
  • Investigating the pharmacogenomics of tyrosine kinase inhibitor cardiotoxicity
  • hiPSC reprogramming, culture and differentiation techniques
  • High-throughput and high-content methodologies in hiPSC-based screening

For lab information and more, see Dr. Burridge’s faculty profile and lab website.

Publications

See Dr. Burridge's publications on PubMed.

Contact

Contact Dr. Burridge at 312-503-4895.

Lab Staff

Postdoctoral Fellows

Malorie Blancard, Hananeh Fonoudi, Mariam Jouni, Davi Leite, Tarek Mohamed, Disheet Shah

Graduate Students

Liora Altman-Sagan, Raymond Copley, K. Ashley Fetterman, Phillip Freeman, Donald McKenna, Emily Pinheiro, Marisol Tejeda, Carly Weddle

Technical Staff

Ali Negahi Shirazi

 Gemma Carvill Lab

Genetic causes and pathogenic mechanism that underlie epilepsy

Research Description

The primary goal of our research is to use gene discovery and molecular biology approaches to identify new treatments for epilepsy. We aim to 1) identify the genetic causes of epilepsy, 2) use stem cell models to understand how genetic mutations can cause epilepsy, 3) develop and test new therapeutics for this condition. Our work is based on the promise of precision medicine where knowledge of an individual’s genetic makeup shapes a personalized approach to care and management of epilepsy.

Current Projects

  • Next generation sequencing in patients with epilepsy
  • Alternative exon usage during neuronal development
  • Identify the regulatory elements that control expression of known epilepsy genes
  • Stem cell genetic models for studying the epigenetic basis of epilepsy

For more information, see Dr. Carvill's faculty profile or the Carvill Lab Website.

Publications

Please see Dr. Caraveo Piso's publications on PubMed.

Contact Information

Gemma L. Carvill, PhD

 Rex Chisholm Lab

Studying molecular motors and cell motility

Research Description

Movement is a fundamental characteristic of life. Cell movement is critical for normal embryogenesis, tissue formation, wound healing and defense against infection. It is also an important factor in diseases such as cancer metastasis and birth defects. Movement of components within cells is necessary for mitosis, hormone secretion, phagocytosis and endocytosis. Molecular motors that move along microfilaments (myosin) and microtubules (dynein) power these movements. Our goal is to understand how these motors produce movement and are regulated. We wish to define their involvement in intracellular, cellular and tissue function and disease—with the long-term goal of developing therapies for the treatment of diseases caused by defects in these molecular motors.

Our work involves the manipulation of myosin and dynein function in the single celled eukaryote Dictyostelium, cultured mammalian cells and transgenic and knockout mice. Yeast two-hybrid screens to identify proteins that interact with or regulate myosin and dynein and characterization of gene expression are being used to define the pathways regulating myosin and dynein. To analyze the biological significance of myosin and dynein, we use confocal and digital microscopy of living cells, analysis of cell movement, vesicle transport and cell division. We employ biochemical techniques including heterologous expression, enzyme purification and characterization and analysis of how phosphorylation state affects physiological function. We are pursuing signal transduction studies to understand the physiologically important pathways that regulate cell motility and biophysical studies such as in vitro motility assays to understand how these molecular motors function at the molecular level.

For lab information and more, see Dr. Chisholm's faculty profile.

Publications

See Dr. Chisholm's publications on PubMed.

Contact

Contact Dr. Chisholm at 312-503-3209.

 Nicolae Valentin David Lab

Molecular mechanisms of metabolic bone diseases, with particular emphasis on the regulation and function of FGF23 in situations of normal and abnormal mineral metabolism.

Dr. David uses a basic science and translational research approach to characterize molecular events that are involved in the expression, post-translational modifications and secretion of the bone hormone FGF23 that is highly elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A major area of his research focuses on investigating a novel mechanism by which inflammatory signals and iron deficiency, common consequences of CKD, regulate FGF23. Our data show that acute inflammation stimulates FGF23 production, but simultaneous increases in FGF23 cleavage maintain normal levels of biologically active protein. However, chronic inflammation and sustained iron deficiency also increase biologically active FGF23, and show that these factors may contribute to elevated FGF23 levels in CKD.

Dr. David’s laboratory is funded by the National Institute of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and the National institute of Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).

Email Dr. David

Faculty Profile

Nicolae Valentin David, PhD

 Erica Davis Lab

Multidisciplinary studies to elucidate the genetic architecture of rare pediatric disease with emphasis on ciliopathies, undiagnosed rare congenital disorders, and neurodevelopment disorders

Research Description

We are focused primarily on the study of pediatric genetic disorders, and our mission is to: a) improve our knowledge of genetic variation that causes these disorders and modulates their severity; b) discover pathomechanisms at the cellular and biochemical level; and c) develop cutting-edge therapeutic modalities that will improve the health and well-being of affected individuals and their families. Our research themes focus on but are not limited to:

  1. Acceleration of gene discovery in proximal and global pediatric cohorts.
  2. Understanding the contextual effect of genetic variation to explain pleiotropy, variable expressivity, and epistasis.
  3. Development and application of experimentally tractable models to delineate underlying pathomechanism.
  4. Establishing in vitro and in vivo assays for human disease modeling that are suitable for medium and high throughout drug screening.
  5. Synthesis of clinical investigation and basic experimental biology to advance molecular diagnosis and identify suitable treatment.

For more information, please see Dr. Davis's faculty profile.

Publications

See Dr. Davis's publications in PubMed.

Contact

Email Dr. Davis

Phone 312-503-7662

 Al George Lab

Investigating the structure, function, pharmacology and molecular genetics of ion channels and channelopathies

George Lab

Research Description

Ion channels are ubiquitous membrane proteins that serve a variety of important physiological functions, provide targets for many types of pharmacological agents and are encoded by genes that can be the basis for inherited diseases affecting the heart, skeletal muscle and nervous system.

Dr. George's research program is focused on the structure, function, pharmacology and molecular genetics of ion channels. He is an internationally recognized leader in the field of channelopathies based on his important discoveries on inherited muscle disorders (periodic paralysis, myotonia), inherited cardiac arrhythmias (congenital long-QT syndrome) and genetic epilepsies. Dr. George’s laboratory was first to determine the functional consequences of a human cardiac sodium channel mutation associated with an inherited cardiac arrhythmia. His group has elucidated the functional and molecular consequences of several brain sodium channel mutations that cause various familial epilepsies and an inherited form of migraine. These finding have motivated pharmacological studies designed to find compounds that suppress aberrant functional behaviors caused by mutations.

Recent Findings

  • Discovery of novel, de novo mutations in human calmodulin genes responsible for early onset, life threatening cardiac arrhythmias in infants and elucidation of the biochemical and physiological consequences of the mutations.
  • Demonstration that a novel sodium channel blocker capable of preferential inhibition of persistent sodium current has potent antiepileptic effects.
  • Elucidation of the biophysical mechanism responsible for G-protein activation of a human voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.9) involved in pain perception.

Current Projects

  • Investigating the functional and physiological consequences of human voltage-gated sodium channel mutations responsible for either congenital cardiac arrhythmias or epilepsy.
  • Evaluating the efficacy and pharmacology of novel sodium channel blockers in mouse models of human genetic epilepsies.
  • Implementing high throughput technologies for studying genetic variability in drug metabolism.
  • Implementing automated electrophysiology as a screening platform for ion channels.

For lab information and more, see Dr. George’s faculty profile.

Publications

See Dr. George's publications on PubMed.

Contact

Contact Dr. George at 312-503-4892.

Lab Staff

Research Faculty

Irawati Kandela, Thomas Lukas, Christopher Thompson, Carlos Vanoye

Senior Researchers

Reshma Desai, Jean-Marc DekeyserPaula FriedmanChristine Simmons

Lab Manager

Tatiana Abramova

Postdoctoral Fellows

Dina Simkin

Medical Residents

Scott Adney, Tracy Gertler

Graduate Students

Huey Dalton, Surobhi Ganguly, Lisa Wren

Technical Staff

Nora Ghabra, Nirvani Jairam

 Alicia Guemez-Gamboa Lab

Identifying and investigating novel molecular bases of cellular recognition that govern neuronal circuit assembly during human development and disease.

Research Description

Developing neurons integrate into functional circuits through a series of cell recognition events, which include neuronal sorting, axon and dendrite patterning, synaptic selection, among others. Our research focuses on cell-surface recognition molecules that mediate interactions between neurons to discriminate and select appropriate targets in the developing brain. Additionally, we seek to uncover novel mechanisms of neural recognition that lead to brain connectivity defects in humans. To explore the broader roles for cell recognition molecules and their pivotal function in neural circuit development, our lab takes advantage of a battery of modern laboratory techniques. These approaches include animal and stem cell disease modeling, as well as next-generation sequencing and CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Identifying fundamental principles of cellular recognition in wiring circuits contributes to our understanding of neurological disorders and how neuronal dysfunction arises from aberrations during development of the human brain.

For lab information and more, see Dr. Guemez-Gamboa's faculty profile and lab website.

Publications

See Dr. Guemez-Gamboa's publications on PubMed.

Contact

Contact Dr. Guemez-Gamboa at 312-503-0752.

Lab Staff

Postdoctoral Fellows

Nadya Gabriela Languren, Jennifer Rakotomamonjy

Technical Staff

Devin Davies, Sean McDermott, Niki Sabetfakhri, Davis Thomas

Temporary Staff

Ian Quiroz

 Jennifer Kearney Lab

Investigating the genetic basis of epilepsy

Research Description

My research program is focused on studying the genetic basis of epilepsy, a common neurological disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population. Epilepsy is thought to have a genetic basis in approximately two-thirds of patients, including a small fraction caused by single gene mutations. Many genes responsible for rare, monogenic epilepsy have been identified. The genes identified are components of neuronal signaling, including voltage-gated ion channels, neurotransmitter receptors, ion-channel associated proteins and synaptic proteins. We use mouse models with mutations in ion channel genes to understand the underlying molecular basis of epilepsy and to identify modifier genes that influence phenotype severity by modifying disease risk. Identifying genes that influence epilepsy risk improves our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology and suggests novel targets for therapeutic intervention.

For lab information and more, see Dr. Kearney's faculty profile.

Publications

See Dr. Kearney's publications on PubMed.

Contact

Contact Dr. Kearney at 312-503-4894.

Lab Staff

Research Faculty

Nicole Hawkins

Postdoctoral Fellow

Thuy Vien

Graduate Students

Erin Baker, Letonia Copeland-Hardin, Dennis Echevarria, Seok Kyu Kang

Technical Staff

Conor Dixon

 Neil Kelleher Lab

The Kelleher Group has three primary lines of research focused on Top Down Proteomics, Natural Products Discovery and Biosynthesis and Chromatin Oncobiology and DNA-Damage.  An underlying focus, driving all lines of research, is our continued push towards optimizing instrumentation and bioinformatic approaches to best suit the unique needs of a Top Down analysis.

Research Description

The main focus for our Top Down Proteomics subgroup is to push the limits for whole proteome analysis of mammalian cells, striving for a future in which Top Down analysis rivals that of Bottom Up in the number of protein identifications per run. Recently, we have seen progress toward this very goal with the introduction of a separation platform specifically designed to minimize the most common problem in Top Down Proteomics, intact protein separations. This platform effectively reduces sample complexity and separates proteins depending on size, resulting in an opportunity for the scientist to select the optimal analysis method for the sample.

Our Natural Products subgroup is focused on the discovery and biosynthesis of novel natural products. Developments from this subgroup include the introduction of the PrISM platform, geared towards the identification of natural products synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) without prior knowledge of a gene sequence. This is made possible by our ability to detect a phosphopantetheinyl (Ppant) ejection marker ion for NRPS/PKS thiolation domains. We also work in collaboration with groups from other universities to provide mass spectrometry analysis of novel biochemical systems.

We also have a long-standing interest in histone analysis. Our Chromatin Oncobiology and DNA-Damage subgroup continues to dig deeper into the "histone code", a complex mixture of post-translational modifications that together determine a host of cellular processes. We are interested in visualizing dynamic histone PTM changes simultaneously on multiple sites. Through application of technology developed in our Top Down Proteomics subgroup, we are able to apply "Precision Proteomics" to histone analysis.


Publications

View lab publications via PubMed.

For more information, visit the Kelleher Lab Web Page or see Dr. Kelleher's faculty profile.

Contact Us

Contact the Kelleher Lab at 847-467-1086 or 847-467-4362

 Peter Kopp Lab

Molecular genetics of thyroid and other endocrine disorders

Research Description

Dr. Kopp's research focuses on various forms of thyroid disease. Principal areas of interests are the molecular genetics of congenital hypothyroidism and Pendred's syndrome. Pendred's syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital sensorineural deafness, goiter and impaired iodide organification. It is caused by mutations in the PDS (Pendred syndrome) gene that encodes pendrin, an anion transporter belonging to the solute carrier family 26A (SCL26A).

Other areas of active research include the molecular genetics of endocrine diseases, such as neurohypophyseal and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and the analysis of polymorphisms in genes involved in androgen metabolism in order to define determinants of steroid hormones and prostate cancer risk in men.

Research Topics

Functional characterization of pendrin
Molecular genetics of congenital hypothyroidism
Genetic factors determining androgen levels

For more information, please see Dr. Kopp's faculty profile.

Publications

See Dr. Kopp's publications in PubMed.

Contact

Dr. Kopp

 William Lowe Lab

Genetic determinants of maternal metabolism and fetal growth

Research Description

A major interest of the Lowe laboratory is genetic determinants of maternal metabolism during pregnancy and the interaction between the intrauterine environment and genetics in determining size at birth.  This interest is being addressed using DNA and phenotype information from ~16,000 mothers and their babies who participated in the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study.  A genome wide association study using DNA from mothers and babies from four different ancestry groups has been performed, with several different loci demonstrating genome-wide significant association with maternal and fetal traits.  Replication studies have confirmed the identified associations.  Studies are now underway now to identify the causal variants and their functional impact.  In related studies performed with investigators at Duke, targeted and untargeted metabolomic studies are underway to determine whether metabolic signatures characteristic of maternal obesity and/or hyperglycemia can be identified in mothers and babies. Integration of metabolomic and genomic data is also planned to more fully characterize maternal metabolism during pregnancy and its interaction with fetal growth.  Finally, a HAPO Follow-Up Study has been initiated in which a subset of the HAPO mothers and babies (now 8-12 years of age) will be recruited to examine the hypothesis that maternal glucose levels during pregnancy are positively correlated with metabolic measures in childhood, including adiposity, lipidemia, glycemia and blood pressure.

For further information visit Dr. Lowe's faculty profile page

Publications

View Dr. Lowe's publications at PubMed

Contact

Email Dr. Lowe

Phone 312-503-2539

 Yong-Chao Ma Lab

Regulation of Motor Neuron and Dopaminergic Neuron Function in Development and Disease

Postdoctoral fellow jobs and graduate student rotation projects are available.

Research Description

Spinal Motor Neurons and Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

SMA is characterized by the selective degeneration of spinal motor neurons. As the leading genetic cause of infant mortality, SMA affects one in every eight thousand live births. Our group is interested in studying mechanism regulating motor neuron development and function, as well as why motor neurons specifically degenerate in SMA. To address these questions, we use a combination of genetic, biochemical and cell biological approaches and utilize genetically modified mice, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells reprogrammed from fibroblasts and zebrafish as model systems. We focus on the regulation of mitochondrial functions in SMA pathogenesis. Based on our findings, we hope to develop new therapeutic strategies for treating SMA.

 
Dopaminergic Neurons and Parkinson's Disease

Dopaminergic neurons located in the ventral midbrain control movement, emotional behavior and reward mechanisms. Dysfunction of these neurons is implicated in Parkinson’s disease, drug addiction, depression and schizophrenia. Our group is interested in the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms regulating dopaminergic neuron functions in disease and aging conditions. We are particularly interested in how aging and mitochondrial oxidative stress contribute to dopaminergic neuron degeneration in Parkinson's disease through transcriptional and epigenetic regulations. We use mouse models, cultured neurons and iPS cells for these studies.

For more information visit Dr. Ma's faculty profile and Dr. Ma's lab website within the Children's Hospital Research Center.

Publications

View Dr. Ma's publications at PubMed

Contact

Email Dr. Ma

Phone 773-755-6339

Lab Staff

Nimrod Miller, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow

Han Shi, Graduate Student

Brittany Edens, Graduate Student

Kevin Park, Graduate Student

Monica Yang, Undergraduate Student

Aaron Zelikovich, Undergraduate Student

 Aline Martin Lab

The Martin Lab investigates the role of the skeleton in the endocrine regulation of mineral metabolism and the cardiovascular complications of mineral and bone diseases.

Our research program focuses on the contribution of the skeleton to the mineral balance in the body.  Bone produces a hormone, Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF)-23, that participates in this balance.  However in mineral metabolism disorders, such as in chronic kidney disease, the massive production of FGF23 is associated with negative outcomes and mortality.  By understanding the mechanisms that control the production of FGF23, our goal is to develop new therapeutic strategies and improve outcomes in mineral metabolism disorders.  To this goal, we perform basic and translational research using a combination of genetics, molecular biology, proteomics, histology and advanced imaging techniques. 

A major focus of the lab is to investigate the transcriptional and post-translational regulation of FGF23 within the bone cells.  In particular, we study the specific role of a known regulator of FGF23, Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1), on these regulations and on osteocyte biology in the context of diseases associated with FGF23 excess (chronic kidney disease, hypophosphatemic rickets …).  A second focus is to investigate the mechanisms involved in negative outcomes associated with FGF23 excess, including bone mineralization defects, cardiac hypertrophy and cognitive defects.  Our team works in collaboration with the Center for Translational Metabolism and Health and the Division of Cardiology at Northwestern, and with multiple additional collaborators and partnerships around the world.

The Martin Lab is sponsored by the National Institute of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and by the Northwestern Women’s Health Research Institute.

Publications

For more information view Dr. Martin's Faculty Profile or  view publications by PubMed

Contact Us

Contact Dr. Martin at 312-503-4160 or the Martin Lab at 312-503-4805, or by email.

 Elizabeth McNally Lab

Genetic mechanisms responsible for inherited human diseases

Research Description

My laboratory studies genetic mechanisms responsible for inherited human diseases including heart failure, cardiomyopathy, muscular dystrophy, arrhythmias, aortic aneurysms. Working with individuals and families, we are defining the genetic mutations that cause these disorders. By establishing models for these disorders, we can now begin to develop and test new therapies, including genetic correction and gene editing.


For lab information and more, see Dr. McNally's faculty profile or visit the McNally Laboratory site.

Publications

See Dr. McNally's publications on PubMed.

Contact

Email Dr. McNally

Phone  312-503-5600

 Minoli Perera Lab

Pharmacogenomics research in minority patient populations

Perera Lab

Research Description

The Perera laboratory focuses on pharmacogenomics (using a patient's genome to predict drug response) in minority populations. Working in this translation research space requires both clinical expertise as well as the use of high-throughput basic science approaches. Our goal is to bring the benefits of precision medicine to all US populations.

The Perera lab has recruited patient populations from around the world. The data collection includes genomic (DNA), transcriptomic (mRNA), pharmacokinetic and clinical data. We then integrate these different data sources to understand genetic drivers of drug response (e.g. genetic predictors of adverse events) as well as disease. By studying minority populations the lab has discovered genetic risk variants that may benefit the implementation of precision medicine in African Americans and others.

Recent Findings

  • Warfarin Bleeding Risk Association study
    We recently discovered a genetic variant that predispose African Americans to bleeding complications while on anticoagulant drugs. These bleeds occurred even when the patient was within the therapeutic window for the medication. We hope that this new data will help to identify high risk individuals prior to therapy.
  • Novel African-specific genetic polymorphisms predict the risk of venous thromboembolism
    We discovered a new genetic variant associated with a 2.5 fold increase in risk of developing a blood clot. We went on to show that this SNP significantly affects the expression of a key protein in the coagulation cascade. View article on PubMed.
  • Common genetic variant is predictive of warfarin metabolism and gene expression in African Americans
    We tested the association of a SNP, previously shown to effect gene expression CYP2C9, for association with warfarin drug clearance (pharmacokinetics). This SNP increased the expression of CYP2C9 (enzyme that metabolized warfarin), hence causing fast clearance of the drug. This African American-specific SNP may help to explain the higher warfarin dose required by African Americans in general. View article on PubMed.

Current Projects

  • Genomics of Drug Metabolism
    We are using African America primary hepatocytes to understand the genetic regulation of drug metabolizing enzymes that are involved in a majority of drug used in the US.
  • Anticoagulant Pharmacogenomics
    We are conducting several genetic association studies to understand both the genetic drivers and the biological mechanisms behind response and adverse effect to anticoagulant medications.
  • Pharmacogenomics of Inflammatory Bowel disease
    We are investigating the genetic predictors of primary non-response to biologic therapies used in inflammatory bowel disease. Studies have implication for other autoimmune disorders that target the same pathways.
  • eMERGE
    We are involved in analyzing the GWAS and sequencing data specifically for genomics variation affect key pharmacogenomics gene in African Americans.

For lab information and more, see Dr. Perera's faculty profile and lab website.

Publications

See Dr. Perera's publications on PubMed.

Contact

Contact Dr. Perera at 312-503-6188 or the lab at 312-503-4119.

Lab Staff

Lab Manager

Cristina Alarcon

Postdoctoral Fellows

Paula Friedman, Guang Yang

Graduate Student

Carolina Clark

 Ali Shilatifard Lab

Studying molecular machinery for histone modifications in yeast, Drosophila and human cells

Research Description

Chromosomal rearrangements resulting in alterations of gene expression are a major cause of hematological malignancies. Our goal is to advance the understanding of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of rearrangement-based leukemia and to provide insights into how translocations affect cellular division by altering gene expression. Using mammalian model systems such as tissue culture and mouse genetics, we plan to explore the regulation of gene expression via the MLL gene and its translocation partners found in human leukemia. We are currently defining the molecular composition of the MLL complexes and how translocations alter its biochemical function and integrity, resulting in leukemic pathogenesis. We are also planning to define the mechanism of the targeting of the MLL complex and its histone methyltransferase activity to chromatin to determine its normal cellular functions and its mistargeting and dysregulation in leukemogenesis.

One fusion partner of MLL in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is the ELL protein. We show that human ELL functions as a transcription elongation factor. We have identified the Drosophila homolog of ELL and demonstrate it to be essential for development.  Drosophila ELL associates with elongating RNA polymerase II in vivo on chromosomes and is a regulator of the Notch signaling pathway.  This has suggested to us that human ELL might also participate in the same process.

For lab information and more, see Dr. Shilatifard's faculty profile or visit the Shilatifard Laboratory site.

Publications

View Dr. Shilatifard's publications on PubMed.

Contact

Email Dr. Shilatifard

Phone 312-503-5223

 Teepu Siddique Lab

We are working to discover causes, understand mechanisms of disease and develop cell and animals model in order to develop rational therapies for neurogenetic and neurodegenerative disorders.
Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Neuromuscular Medicine

Research Description

Our research laboratory is working to determine the causes of and treatments for neurodegenerative disorders and those that affect the muscle, the neuromuscular junction, peripheral nerves and central control of these systems, in particularly those that involve mitochondria and those that involve motor neuron function, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal dementia and ALS (ALS/FTD), primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), the hereditary spastic parapareses (HSP) and related disorders. Recently, we have discovered novel genetic causes of Parkinson Disease. This laboratory has pioneered the gene discovery approach to ALS and related disorders, engineered the first mouse model and have since identified basic molecular mechanisms of pathology in ALS and ALS/dementia on which rational therapy can be now based.

For more information see the faculty profile of Teepu Siddique, MD.

Publications

View Dr. Siddique's full list of publications at PubMed.

Contact Us

Teepu Siddique, MD at 312-503-4737

 Margrit Urbanek Lab

Susceptibility genes for complex diseases

Research Description

Dr. Urbanek’s research focuses on the identification of susceptibility genes for complex diseases.  Her approach to this research is to use family-based gene-mapping techniques and population-based association studies in conjunction with molecular techniques to identify and verify genes and pathways contributing to the pathogenesis of genetically complex diseases. Specifically, she is carrying out studies to identify susceptibility genes for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) that map to Chr19p3.13.  She has previously shown that this region shows linkage and association with PCOS in a large set of families.   Other projects focus on identifying candidate genes for gestational diabetes and glycemic control during pregnancy and identifying genetic variation contributing to extreme obesity

Research Topics

Identification of sequence variants in PCOS candidate genes
Identification of candidate genes for contributing glycemic control during pregnancy and to gestational diabetes
Genetic variation contributing to extreme obesity
Linkage and family-based association studies
Haplotype analysis
Genome-wide association studies

For more information, visit Dr. Urbanek's faculty profile page.

Publications

View Dr. Urbanek's publications at PubMed.

Contact

Email Dr. Urbanek.

Phone 312-503-3658

Lab Staff

Graduate Students

Lidija Gorsic

 Deborah Winter Lab

Computational immunology - Using genomic approaches to study rheumatic disease.

Research Description

The goal of the Winter Lab of Functional Genomics is to apply genomic approaches to study rheumatic disease. Led by Dr. Deborah Winter, a computational immunologist, we employ the latest technologies for assays, such as RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, ATAC-seq and single cell expression, to profile the transcriptional and epigenomic profiles of immune cells in health and disease. Our goal is to define the underlying regulatory networks and understanding how they respond to challenge, illness and injury. We are particularly interested in the role of macrophages in diseases such as scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. Previous research has addressed the impact of the tissue environment on resident macrophages and the role of microglia, CNS-resident macrophages, in brain development. Our research combines molecular and systems biology, biotechnology, clinical applications and computer science. We use both mouse models and patient samples to help us understand and test different systems. We are committed to high standards of analysis and are continually updating and training in innovative computational techniques. We are currently recruiting highly motivated individuals to join the lab.

For more information, visit the faculty profile of Dr. Winter.

Publications

View Dr. Winter's publications at PubMed

Contact Us

Contact Dr. Winter at  312-503-0535 or by email.

 Wei Zhang Lab

Genetics and epigenetics of complex traits including risks for common diseases and drug response

Dr. Zhang is particularly interested in using high throughput technologies (e.g., microarray, next generation sequencing) and systems biology approaches to study the genetics of complex traits or phenotypes such as the risks of common diseases (e.g., cancer and lung disease), individual drug response and gene expression. Dr. Zhang is also interested in building bioinformatic databases that aim to provide user friendly access to primary data from pharmacogenomic and genome-wide association studies (GWAS). An on-going research interest of Dr. Zhang’s is the mapping of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in sarcoidosis and sickle cell disease, as well as the impact of eQTL mapping on the prioritization of GWAS results form these complex diseases.

For more information, visit Dr. Zhang's Faculty Profile page.

Contact

Email Dr. Zhang

Phone 312-503-1040

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