Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Driskill Graduate Program in Life Sciences

Christopher J Payne, PhD

Christopher J Payne, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynecology

Focus of Work

Bio

Christopher Payne received his PhD from the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology at the Oregon Health and Science University in 2003. He continued his training with postdoctoral fellowships at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the University of Washington and the Jackson Laboratory from 2004 through 2009. Since 2009 he has been at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, where he is currently an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Obstetrics a...[Read full text]Christopher Payne received his PhD from the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology at the Oregon Health and Science University in 2003. He continued his training with postdoctoral fellowships at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the University of Washington and the Jackson Laboratory from 2004 through 2009. Since 2009 he has been at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, where he is currently an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynecology. His research interests focus on the role of epigenetic changes that impact the development, differentiation and aging of cells within the testis, specifically the spermatogenic and Sertoli lineages. He is an author on more than 30 journal articles and maintains active NIH funding.[Shorten text]

Academic Focus

My lab focuses on how genetic and epigenetic modulators promote the development and maintenance of adult stem cells. Microenvironments, or niches, support the maintenance of stem cells and facilitate the development of tumors through largely unknown mechanisms. Cell-autonomous genetic pathways and epigenetic networks have emerged as important determinants for the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells in embryonic, juvenile, and adult issues. The importance of non-cell autonomous genetic...[Read full text]My lab focuses on how genetic and epigenetic modulators promote the development and maintenance of adult stem cells. Microenvironments, or niches, support the maintenance of stem cells and facilitate the development of tumors through largely unknown mechanisms. Cell-autonomous genetic pathways and epigenetic networks have emerged as important determinants for the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells in embryonic, juvenile, and adult issues. The importance of non-cell autonomous genetic and epigenetic factors is less well established. Our goal is to identify and characterize the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms utilized by both stem cells and their surrounding niche in supporting the stem cell program. For these studies, the developing mouse testis is used to examine interactions between male germline stem cells and their somatic niche. Human mesenchymal stem cells are also used as an in vitro model system.[Shorten text]

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Education and Certification

  • PhD: Oregon Health & Science University , Cell & Developmental Biology (2003)
  • Postdoctoral Fellowship: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Developmental Biology (2004)
  • Postdoctoral Fellowship: University of Washington, Developmental Biology (2007)

Contact

773-755-6316

Stanley Manne Children’s Research Institute Box 211
225 East Chicago Avenue
Chicago IL 60611