Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Department of Urology
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Clinical Trials

Clinical and Outcomes Research under the direction of the Department of Dermatology is conducted both at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago dermatology clinics.

For more information about the research or participation, please call our office at 312-695-6829.

Feinberg Clinical Trials

Scientists at the medical school are conducting hundreds of clinical trials daily. Learn more about all our work via the Feinberg Office of Research Clinical Trials page. Search for trials by disease or condition.

Trials
Chemokine mechanisms in chronic pelvic pain
The purpose of this study is to investigate the types of biomarkers, which are measurable indicators of a health condition, present in patients who suffer from chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Biomarker levels will be determined from patient samples of blood, …
The purpose of this study is to investigate the types of biomarkers, which are measurable indicators of a health condition, present in patients who suffer from chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Biomarker levels will be determined from patient samples of blood, urine, and expressed prostatic secretions.
Patients who report a response of at least 1 on the pain, pressure or discomfort scale for chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) and report pain or discomfort in the Male Genitourinary Pain index. Pain must be present for 3 out of the past 6 months. Must be 18 years of age or older.
Thumbikat, PraveenThumbikat, Praveen
  • Map it 201 E. Huron St.
    Chicago, IL
STU00030121
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Thumbikat, Praveen 1-888-NU-STUDY
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Microbiomes of Pelvic Pain
Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC) is characterized by chronic pelvic pain and voiding dysfunction. IC remains an enigma within urology, with no known etiology or widely effective therapies. However, some IC patients suffer bowel co-morbidities, and it …
Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC) is characterized by chronic pelvic pain and voiding dysfunction. IC remains an enigma within urology, with no known etiology or widely effective therapies. However, some IC patients suffer bowel co-morbidities, and it is well established that the GI tract can influence bladder function and sensation via pelvic organ crosstalk. Like other body sites, the gut harbors a rich microflora. Studies characterizing microbial diversity and relative abundance at a particular body site, the “microbiome,” reveal that microbiomes play critical roles in normal cellular and organ function, and thus this importance is emphasized with the Human Microbiome Project (HMP), an NIH Common Fund initiative. Microbiomes are also dynamic and subject to skewing, and these changes are increasingly associated with diseases including Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and obesity. Antibiotic therapies alter microbiomes, often causing temporary dysfunction and sometimes resulting in diseases such as colitis. Since IC patients often have a history of urinary tract infection (UTI), they typically receive multiple courses of antibiotics. This therapeutic history of IC patients may have adverse consequences for two reasons. First, potential skewing of the gut microbiome may alter normal sensory and functional homeostatic mechanisms, contributing to pain and voiding dysfunction. Second, an altered gut microbiome may foster uropathogen reservoir expansion, and our preliminary data demonstrate urinary E. coli isolates can induce chronic pelvic pain persisting long after microbial clearance. Together these lines of reasoning raise the provocative possibility that microbiomes contribute to IC directly by supplying uropathogens or indirectly through organ crosstalk dysfunction. Therefore, is an altered gastrointestinal and/or reproductive tract microbiome associated with IC? Our team marries core NIH and NIDDK missions, digestive diseases and kidney/urologic, to address this novel question with synergistic expertise in clinical diagnosis of IC, quantifying GI and reproductive tract microbiomes, and mechanisms of microbe-induced pelvic pain.
Klumpp, DavidKlumpp, David
STU00055668
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Mohammed, Juned Ali Khan 1-888-NU-STUDY
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The Genetics of Prostate Cancer in Active Surveillance
Our study uses saliva samples to detect whether or not active surveillance is the best option for the subject, based on their their genetic makeup and susceptibility to aggressive prostate cancer.
1. Patients diagnosed with prostate cancer
2. Patients with Gleason ≤ 3+3 prostate cancer
3. Patients with fewer than 3 cores involved with cancer. If a patient has 3 or more cores involved with cancer but still meets all pathologic criteria and after discussing risks and benefits does not want definitive treatment, he may still be eligible for active surveillance.
4. Patients with no more than 50% of any 1 core involved with prostate cancer. If a patient has more than 50% of any 1 core involved with prostate cancer but still meets all pathologic criteria and after discussing risks and benefits does not want definitive treatment, he may still be eligible for active surveillance.
5. Patients age > 18. Patients are typically offered AS if they are ≥ 60 years of age. However, if a man meets pathologic criteria and is < 60, he can be entered in AS if, after discussing risks and benefits, does not want definitive treatment.
6. Most patients will have PSA value ≤ 10 ng/ml. However, since PSA is prostate specific and not prostate cancer specific, many patients with elevated PSA levels > 10 ng/ml will not have prostate cancer, and PSA is elevated due to conditions such as BPH or inflammation. If a patient has a PSA value > 10 ng/ml, but still meets all pathologic criteria, he may still be eligible for active surveillance
Kundu, Shilajit DKundu, Shilajit D
  • Map it 201 E. Huron St.
    Chicago, IL
STU00059221
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Khawaja, Faizan 312 694 2417
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Institution-wide Registry of Klinefelter Syndrome Patients
The goa of this study is to better understand the clinical characteristics of our Klinefelter Syndrome patients at Northwestern to better understand the clinical course and treatment outcomes of the condition. We hope that the results of thi…
The goa of this study is to better understand the clinical characteristics of our Klinefelter Syndrome patients at Northwestern to better understand the clinical course and treatment outcomes of the condition. We hope that the results of this research will lead to future research in Klinefelter Syndrome.
Men ages 18-89 with a confirmed diagnosis of mosaic and non-mosaic Klinefelter Syndrome (47,XXY)
Brannigan, Robert EBrannigan, Robert E
STU00071754
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312 695 8146
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Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) for Treatment of Signs and Symptoms of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)
This is an open-labeled, non-randomized feasibility study to evaluate the safety of prostate artery embolization (PAE) for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms a…
This is an open-labeled, non-randomized feasibility study to evaluate the safety of prostate artery embolization (PAE) for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms attributed to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).
Salem, RiadSalem, Riad
NCT02026908 STU00081296
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Jenkins, Kimberly 312 695 9327
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Epigenetic Markers of Bladder Cancer Progression
The purpose of this study is to better understand the expression of certain genes and genetic changes that occur in bladder tumors.
Male or female patients aged 40-89 identified to have a bladder lesion or mass concerning for urothelial carcinoma based on cystoscopy or imaging who are scheduled to undergo transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT).
Meeks, Joshua JMeeks, Joshua J
STU00088853
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Meeks, Joshua J 312 695 8146
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A Single-Center Pilot Study of the Role of Transurethral Ultrasound in Staging Bladder Cancer in Patients Scheduled to Undergo Transurethral Resection of Bladder Tumor
This study aims to determine if ultrasound is effective in the staging of bladder cancer.
Patients with bladder cancer who will be undergoing cystoscopy and/or cystectomy.
Kundu, Shilajit DKundu, Shilajit D
STU00201635
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Kundu, Shilajit D 312 695 8146
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MAST CELLS IN MALE CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN AND LOWER URINARY TRACT DYSFUNCTION
The purpose of this study is to figure out if drug treatments using cromolyn sodium and cetirizine hydrochloride lessen painful symptoms in patients suffering from chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS).
Men diagnosed with Category IIIB Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome reporting pain or discomfort in any of the 8 domains of the NIH Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI). Symptoms must have been present for the majority of the time during any 3 months in the previous 6 months.
Thumbikat, PraveenThumbikat, Praveen
  • Map it 201 E. Huron St.
    Chicago, IL
NCT03167216 STU00202831
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Thumbikat, Praveen 312 503 1050
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The Molecular Markers of Bladder Cancer
Genetic research may discover genes, find out how genes function, or help researchers learn how to use what we know about genes to treat or prevent and treat disease. The purpose is to study whether the results of genetic testing can predict if bladder cancer i…
Genetic research may discover genes, find out how genes function, or help researchers learn how to use what we know about genes to treat or prevent and treat disease. The purpose is to study whether the results of genetic testing can predict if bladder cancer is going to recur, progress (get worse), or respond to chemotherapy.
Male or female patients ages 40-89 with high-grade T1 bladder cancer or patients with muscle invasive (>T2) bladder cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical cystectomy.
Meeks, Joshua JMeeks, Joshua J
STU00204352
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312 695 8146
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Clinical Database of Nephrectomy at Northwestern University
The goal of this study is to determine the current clinical outcomes of our nephrectomy patients at Northwestern (such as complications and survival). We hope to keep track of patients for the first 5-years following radical or partial nep…
The goal of this study is to determine the current clinical outcomes of our nephrectomy patients at Northwestern (such as complications and survival). We hope to keep track of patients for the first 5-years following radical or partial nephrectomy in order to better understand the long-term behavior of the disease.
Patients ages 18-89 with a diagnosis of kidney cancer.
Nadler, Robert BNadler, Robert B
STU00205973
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kidney cancer

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312 695 6124
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Next-Generation sequencing of cell-free circulating tumor DNA in locally invasive bladder cancer
bloodstream. These pieces are called cell-free circulating tumor DNA (cfDNA). Recent studies in lung and breast cancers have shown that cfDNA can be screened for certain mutations to detect and follow t…
bloodstream. These pieces are called cell-free circulating tumor DNA (cfDNA). Recent studies in lung and breast cancers have shown that cfDNA can be screened for certain mutations to detect and follow the growth of a patient’s tumor. This study aims to apply this technique to bladder cancer and to identify specific mutations unique to varying stages of bladder cancer. This technology has been applied to other cancers but has not yet been studied in bladder cancer. We plan to determine whether this technology is able to identify genetic mutations linked to bladder cancer.
Patients age 18-89 years old with early invasive (T1) and muscle invasive (T2+) bladder cancer .
Meeks, Joshua JMeeks, Joshua J
STU00206645
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312 695 8146
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Partial Wave Spectroscopy for Urine Cytology Analysis
Bladder cancer is the fourth most common in men and sixth overall and while approximately 75% of patients will be diagnosed with superficial cancer, there is a high rate of recurrence. Currently, diagnosis and surveillance require invasive testing…
Bladder cancer is the fourth most common in men and sixth overall and while approximately 75% of patients will be diagnosed with superficial cancer, there is a high rate of recurrence. Currently, diagnosis and surveillance require invasive testing – cystoscopy (using a scope to look inside the bladder). While urine tests are used as part of the workup and follow-up, the current urine tests are limited. Our goal is to test a new technique that looks at individual cells to see if we can improve cancer detection. Cells that line the bladder are frequently shed into the urine, and therefore, these can be studied simply by providing a urine sample and without an invasive test. Our hope is that this urine test will be able to improve initial diagnosis and follow-up for patients with bladder cancer This is an investigational technique and is not approved by the USFDA.
Patients age 18-89 with a confirmed pathologic diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.
Meeks, Joshua JMeeks, Joshua J
STU00206508
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Meeks, Joshua J 312 695 8146
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Spina Bifida Database of Northwestern University
The overall goal of this study is to create a database is to determine the current clinical outcomes of our spina bifida patients at Northwestern (such as treatment choice, prognosis, and complications) to help better understand the long-term urologic …
The overall goal of this study is to create a database is to determine the current clinical outcomes of our spina bifida patients at Northwestern (such as treatment choice, prognosis, and complications) to help better understand the long-term urologic needs of this population. We hope that this improved understanding will aid clinicians when determining treatment choice for spina bifida patients as well as improve overall quality of life for patients with this condition.
Patients age 18-89 diagnosed with spina bifida, or spina bifida occulta, or tethered cord.
Kielb, Stephanie JKielb, Stephanie J
STU00207358
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spina bifida

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312 695 8146
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Clinical Database of Peyronie’s Disease at Northwestern University
The goal of this research is to create a database to better understand the clinical characteristics of Peyronie’s disease patients at Northwestern.We hope that the results of this research will allow us to better understand the di…
The goal of this research is to create a database to better understand the clinical characteristics of Peyronie’s disease patients at Northwestern.We hope that the results of this research will allow us to better understand the disease and lead to future research in Peyronie’s disease.
Males 18-89 years of age with Peyronie’s disease
Bennett Jr, NelsonBennett Jr, Nelson
STU00207415
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312 695 6124
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Isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to develop novel therapeutics for cancer and autoimmune diseases
The purpose of this study is to collect blood samples to help find new ways to treat diseases. Our lab develops small particles that have the potential to be useful for the delivery of t…
The purpose of this study is to collect blood samples to help find new ways to treat diseases. Our lab develops small particles that have the potential to be useful for the delivery of therapeutic agents like anticancer drugs to cells or to remove biotoxins from the human body. We would like to test in the laboratory if these particles have any harmful effects on human blood cells. You will not come in contact with these particles, and all experiments will be performed on the blood sample only. You will be asked to provide a blood sample. About 10mls or approximately 2 tablespoons will be drawn.
Healthy, non-pregnant, adult (age 18-75 years) participants

Thaxton, Colby SThaxton, Colby S
STU00207342
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Thaxton, Colby S 312 503 1826
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Clinical Database of male Testosterone Deficiency at Northwestern University
The overall goal of this database is to determine the current clinical outcomes of patients diagnosed with Testosterone Deficiency at Northwestern (such as treatment choice, prognosis, fertility status and treatment outcom…
The overall goal of this database is to determine the current clinical outcomes of patients diagnosed with Testosterone Deficiency at Northwestern (such as treatment choice, prognosis, fertility status and treatment outcomes.
Males age 18-89 years old with two or more early morning testosterone tests with levels below <300ng/dl.
Brannigan, Robert EBrannigan, Robert E
  • Map it 201 East Huron Street Suite 12-160​
    Chicago, IL
STU00207420
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312 526 8146
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