Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Department of Urology

Clinical Trials

As part of an academic medical center, the Department of Urology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (Feinberg) aims to improve the human health through scientific research.

About Clinical Trials
Clinical trials test or study drugs, surgical procedures, medical devices, or interventions with human subjects. They look to determine their safety and effectiveness in relation to treating specific diseases. Clinical trials are part of clinical research and are at the heart of all medical advances.

Department of Urology Clinical Trials
The following searchable list includes all Department of Urology clinical trials currently looking for participants.

Contact Us
Please feel free to contact us with inquiries about any of our ongoing research.

Trials
Chemokine mechanisms in chronic pelvic pain
The purpose of this study is to investigate the types of biomarkers, which are measurable indicators of a health condition, present in patients who suffer from chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Biomarker levels will be determined from patient samples of blood, …
The purpose of this study is to investigate the types of biomarkers, which are measurable indicators of a health condition, present in patients who suffer from chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Biomarker levels will be determined from patient samples of blood, urine, and expressed prostatic secretions.
Patients who report a response of at least 1 on the pain, pressure or discomfort scale for chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) and report pain or discomfort in the Male Genitourinary Pain index. Pain must be present for 3 out of the past 6 months. Must be 18 years of age or older.
Thumbikat, PraveenThumbikat, Praveen
  • Map it 201 E. Huron St.
    Chicago, IL
STU00030121
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For more information on this study please contact us:

Thumbikat, Praveen 1-888-NU-STUDY
Microbiomes of Pelvic Pain
Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC) is characterized by chronic pelvic pain and voiding dysfunction. IC remains an enigma within urology, with no known etiology or widely effective therapies. However, some IC patients suffer bowel co-morbidities, and it …
Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC) is characterized by chronic pelvic pain and voiding dysfunction. IC remains an enigma within urology, with no known etiology or widely effective therapies. However, some IC patients suffer bowel co-morbidities, and it is well established that the GI tract can influence bladder function and sensation via pelvic organ crosstalk. Like other body sites, the gut harbors a rich microflora. Studies characterizing microbial diversity and relative abundance at a particular body site, the “microbiome,” reveal that microbiomes play critical roles in normal cellular and organ function, and thus this importance is emphasized with the Human Microbiome Project (HMP), an NIH Common Fund initiative. Microbiomes are also dynamic and subject to skewing, and these changes are increasingly associated with diseases including Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and obesity. Antibiotic therapies alter microbiomes, often causing temporary dysfunction and sometimes resulting in diseases such as colitis. Since IC patients often have a history of urinary tract infection (UTI), they typically receive multiple courses of antibiotics. This therapeutic history of IC patients may have adverse consequences for two reasons. First, potential skewing of the gut microbiome may alter normal sensory and functional homeostatic mechanisms, contributing to pain and voiding dysfunction. Second, an altered gut microbiome may foster uropathogen reservoir expansion, and our preliminary data demonstrate urinary E. coli isolates can induce chronic pelvic pain persisting long after microbial clearance. Together these lines of reasoning raise the provocative possibility that microbiomes contribute to IC directly by supplying uropathogens or indirectly through organ crosstalk dysfunction. Therefore, is an altered gastrointestinal and/or reproductive tract microbiome associated with IC? Our team marries core NIH and NIDDK missions, digestive diseases and kidney/urologic, to address this novel question with synergistic expertise in clinical diagnosis of IC, quantifying GI and reproductive tract microbiomes, and mechanisms of microbe-induced pelvic pain.
Klumpp, DavidKlumpp, David
STU00055668
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Mohammed, Juned Ali Khan 1-888-NU-STUDY
The Genetics of Prostate Cancer in Active Surveillance
Our study uses saliva samples to detect whether or not active surveillance is the best option for the subject, based on their their genetic makeup and susceptibility to aggressive prostate cancer.
1. Patients diagnosed with prostate cancer
2. Patients with Gleason ≤ 3+3 prostate cancer
3. Patients with fewer than 3 cores involved with cancer. If a patient has 3 or more cores involved with cancer but still meets all pathologic criteria and after discussing risks and benefits does not want definitive treatment, he may still be eligible for active surveillance.
4. Patients with no more than 50% of any 1 core involved with prostate cancer. If a patient has more than 50% of any 1 core involved with prostate cancer but still meets all pathologic criteria and after discussing risks and benefits does not want definitive treatment, he may still be eligible for active surveillance.
5. Patients age > 18. Patients are typically offered AS if they are ≥ 60 years of age. However, if a man meets pathologic criteria and is < 60, he can be entered in AS if, after discussing risks and benefits, does not want definitive treatment.
6. Most patients will have PSA value ≤ 10 ng/ml. However, since PSA is prostate specific and not prostate cancer specific, many patients with elevated PSA levels > 10 ng/ml will not have prostate cancer, and PSA is elevated due to conditions such as BPH or inflammation. If a patient has a PSA value > 10 ng/ml, but still meets all pathologic criteria, he may still be eligible for active surveillance
Kundu, Shilajit DKundu, Shilajit D
  • Map it 201 E. Huron St.
    Chicago, IL
STU00059221
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For more information on this study please contact us:

Kundu, Shilajit D 1-888-NU-STUDY
Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) for Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)
This is an open-labeled, non-randomized feasibility study to evaluate the safety of prostate artery embolization (PAE) for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms attributed to be…
This is an open-labeled, non-randomized feasibility study to evaluate the safety of prostate artery embolization (PAE) for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms attributed to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).
Salem, RiadSalem, Riad
NCT02026908 STU00081296
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Karp, Jennifer 312 926 5289
Epigenetic Markers of Bladder Cancer Progression
The purpose of this study is to better understand the expression of certain genes and genetic changes that occur in bladder tumors.
Male or female patients aged 40-89 identified to have a bladder lesion or mass concerning for urothelial carcinoma based on cystoscopy or imaging who are scheduled to undergo transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT).
Meeks, Joshua JMeeks, Joshua J
STU00088853
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Meeks, Joshua J 1-888-NU-STUDY
MAST CELLS IN MALE CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN AND LOWER URINARY TRACT DYSFUNCTION
The purpose of this study is to figure out if drug treatments using cromolyn sodium and cetirizine hydrochloride lessen painful symptoms in patients suffering from chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS).
Men diagnosed with Category IIIB Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome reporting pain or discomfort in any of the 8 domains of the NIH Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI). Symptoms must have been present for the majority of the time during any 3 months in the previous 6 months.
Thumbikat, PraveenThumbikat, Praveen
  • Map it 201 E. Huron St.
    Chicago, IL
NCT03167216 STU00202831
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For more information on this study please contact us:

Thumbikat, Praveen 312 503 1050