Feb

22

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Francis (Frank) Alonzo, PhD

Bacteriology Faculty Search Candidate

"Investigating How Staphylococcus aureus Evades host Antimicribial Defenses"

Francis (Frank) Alonzo, PhD / Loyola University Medical Center

Description

The survival of Staphylococcus aureus in an infected host is predicated on a range of adaptive pathogenic traits. Two critical bacterial adaptations that promote S. aureus virulence are (1) the ability to evade host immunity and (2) the ability to acquire trace nutrients within disparate environments. This seminar will examine how bacterial synthesis and salvage of a metabolic cofactor permits survival of S. aureus in nutrient restricted tissues and simultaneously blunts innate immune cell activation to promote infection.

Feb

23

Bacteriology Journal Club: Jeremy Ritzert

Jeremy will present a journal article.

Feb

27

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Caitlin Pegg

The Department of Microbiology-Immunology Seminar Series

"Alphaherpesvirus Large Tegument Protein Mediates Intracellular Transport Dynamics During Infection"

Caitlin Pegg, Graduate Student, Lab of Gregrory Smith, PhD /Northwestern University

Description

Mar

01

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Jing Yan, PhD

Bacteriology Faculty Search Candidate

"Building A Home the V.cholerae Way:Biophysics of Bacterial Biofilms"

Jing Yan, PhD / Princeton University

Description

Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities embedded in an extracellular matrix. Bacterial biofilms can cause chronic infections and they clog pipes and filters in industry. Investigations to date have primarily focused on the genetic and regulatory features driving biofilm formation. In this seminar, I will discuss how I have used Vibrio cholerae as a model biofilm former to reveal the biophysical and biomechanical principles underlying biofilm formation. I will present a new technology to image living, growing bacterial biofilms at single-cell resolution. I will use this imaging technique to investigate how cell growth, cell-cell adhesion, and cell-surface adhesion, collectively, determine the global biofilm architecture. I will show how matrix production drives biofilm expansion and excludes cheater cells. Finally, I will discuss efforts to measure the material properties of biofilms. I will show how understanding biofilms as living materials enabled the development of methods for their removal.

Mar

02

Bacteriology Journal Club: Caleb Stubbs

Caleb will present a journal article.

Mar

06

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Owen Pornillos, PhD

The Department of Microbiology-Immunology Seminar Series

“Structural biology of HIV-1 Assembly and Maturation”

Owen Pornillos, PhD /University of Virginia

Description

HIV assembly and maturation proceed through the programmed operation of molecular switches, which trigger both local and global structural rearrangements to produce infectious particles. Our group applies structural biology techniques to understand how the viral capsid initially assembles as a spherical, immature shell and then upon proteolysis re-assembles into a mature, fullerene capsid. We also help to elucidate the mechanisms of action of various experimental inhibitors of HIV assembly and maturation.

Mar

07

Virology Club: Roli Mandhana

"TBD"

Roli Mandhana. Horvath Lab. Northwestern University.

Mar

08

MIcrobiology-Immunology Department: M.-N. Frances Yap, PhD

Bacteriology Faculty Search Candidate

"Bacterial Survivalby RibosoeMethylationand Silencing"

M.-N. Frances Yap / St. Louis University

Description

Ribosome constitutes one-third of the bacterial biomass and serves as a successful target for >50% of the therapeutically important antibiotics. In this presentation, I will discuss the consequences of ribosome methylation and hibernation on antibiotic resistance and translational stress response.

Mar

09

Bacteriology Journal Club: Tim Turner and Jackson Campbell

Tim and Jackson will present their research-in-progress.

Mar

13

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Ian Mohr, PhD

The Department of Microbiology-Immunology Seminar Series

"Control of Host mRNA Translation and its Impact on Herpesvirus Lifestyle Decisions”

Ian Mohr, PhD  / New York University

Description

Two vignettes illustrating the impact of host mRNA translation upon herpesvirus infection biology will be presented. First, the way in which the host translational landscape changes in response to acute cytomegalovirus infection and regulates virus reproduction will be discussed. Next, a role for host mRNA translation in regulating herpes simplex virus latency in neurons will be described. Ongoing host protein synthesis provides a window into host physiology and homeostasis, and stress-induced changes trigger reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus infections.

Mar

15

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Ana Flores-Mireles, PhD

Bacteriology Faculty Search Candidate

"Urinary Catheterization: Microbial Window of Opportunities"

Ana Flores-Mireles, PhD / Washington University Medical School

Description

Urinary catheterization elicits bladder inflammation in both mice and humans, and mechanically disrupts the host defenses allowing pathogen such as Enterococcus faecalis to colonize, persist, and disseminate. Our work has unveiled key interaction factors between the host and pathogen and by blocking this interaction we were able to protect mice against the infection. Identification of these key interactions could lead to the development of antibiotic-sparring treatments, which are desperately needed since several uropathogens are becoming resistant to last-line of defense antibiotics.

 

Mar

16

Bacteriology Journal Club: Kelly Bachta

Kelly will present a journal article.

Mar

20

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Robert Heinzen, PhD

The Department of Microbiology-Immunology Seminar Series

"Adaptations Enabling Intra- and Extracellular Survival of Coxiella burnetii"

Robert Heinzen, PhD / National Institutes of Health, NIAID

Description

Coxiella burnetii causes the zoonotic disease Q fever. The organism can replicate in the harsh confines of a macrophage phagolysosome and survive for years in the environment. Using new genetic tools, we are unraveling mechanisms that subvert host cell functions and promote extracellular viability. Our result provide insight into eucaryotic cell parasitism and extracellular resistance.

 

Mar

23

Bacteriology Journal Club: Mallory Agard

Mallory will present a journal article.

Mar

27

Microbiology-Immunology Department: Demian Cazalla, PhD

The Department of Microbiology-Immunology Seminar Series

"Lessons from Viruses: Novel Roles for Non-coding RNAs in the Regulation of Gene Expression"

Demian Cazalla, PhD / University of Utah

Description

Herpesvirus saimiri is an oncogenic herpesvirus that expresses seven Sm-class non-coding RNAs of unknown function called HSURs. We have found that one of these HSURs (HSUR2) base-pairs with mRNAs and recruits two cellular miRNAs to repress the expression of its target mRNAs. Using this mechanism, this virus can inhibit apoptosis in infected cells. These results reveal a new function for Sm-class RNAs as regulators of gene expression after pre-mRNA processing, and uncover a previously unrecognized strategy used by herpesviruses to rewire cellular pathways to escape apoptosis.

Apr

04

Virology Club: Dr. Oana Maier

"TBD."

Oana Maier, PhD. Smith Lab. Northwestern University.

May

02

Virology Club: Dr. Jonathan Leis

"Broad Based Antiviral Agents that Block the Budding of Enveloped Viruses from Cells"

Jonathan Leis, Ph.D. Northwestern University.

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