Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Honors Program in Medical Education

Mokaram

The benefits of an Undergraduate education are often lost amidst the multitude of pressures and requirements that are characteristics of a traditional medical education. If it weren’t for HPME, I would have been a bio-medical engineer trapped in the mundane mathematical equations and problem sets instead of being free in developing critical communication skills in the classroom, learning to be a leader on campus, and discovering my passion for non-profit work with various Chicago organizations. The emotional, spiritual, and intellectual challenge that HPME provided has instilled in me the ambition and thoughtfulness that is required to be a physician who is endlessly committed to the pursuit of serving the human community.

Upon graduating High School, I thought I had everything figured out. It is only after I left the comforts of home that I realized that there was much to be learned and discovered. My commitment to medicine has never wavered but the reasons for wanting to be a physician have found new resting places. The security and flexibility of HPME allowed me to venture out to areas of interests and study that I would never have considered before or simply would have been afraid to. I decided to pursue Religious Studies as my Undergraduate major, which served as the perfect complement to my pre-medical scientific studies. Being intimately attached to studying what motivates and influences people pushed me to re-inspect the relevance of my own spirituality. The exposure to non-scientific scholarship allowed me to organize speaking events on political, social, and religious issues for the Northwestern student body. This leadership experience with the Muslim-cultural Students Association motivated me to learn more about the American-Muslim community through securing a WCAS summer research grant in order to pursue independent study. The social science research I conducted with the help of the grant gave me an access to the non-profit world through which I found people and passions that I will treasure for a lifetime. Particularly, my work with the Inner-city Muslim Action Network (IMAN) served as a living example of how to positively employ one’s spirituality to serve underprivileged communities. Fortunately, I was able to provide the same chance for others on campus via the establishment of the first-ever college chapter of IMAN at Northwestern. Additionally, through my service in the free health clinic at IMAN, I discovered my passion for Public Health, one that translated into my pursuit of the Masters in Public Health degree at Northwestern.

Today, I find myself continuing the spirit of my Undergraduate years through working as the Youth Coordinator for the Council on American Islamic Relations, a civil rights organization, in addition to being a 1st year MD/MPH student. Even with the challenge of medical school, my passions and commitments still run deep. Honestly, I would have never once thought that this would be the story I would write by choosing HPME. HPME is not responsible for the particular things that I accomplished or achieved but, more importantly, it instrumental in allowing me to dictate the course of my own goals, ambitions, and maturation so I can one day be the physician that I want to be.

Mokaram