Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Driskill Graduate Program in Life Sciences

Praveen  Thumbikat, PhD

Praveen Thumbikat, PhD

O'Connor Family Research Professor of Urology

Associate Professor of Urology and Pathology

Focus of Work

Bio

The focus of research in my laboratory is to understand the immune basis of prostate disease in humans. We have a particular emphasis on chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), a debilitating medical condition characterized by dysuria and pelvic pain. My laboratory is very interested in understanding the mechanism underlying inflammation of the human prostate and it's impact on prostate diseases. The laboratory utilizes comparative animal models that closely track human pros...[Read full text]The focus of research in my laboratory is to understand the immune basis of prostate disease in humans. We have a particular emphasis on chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), a debilitating medical condition characterized by dysuria and pelvic pain. My laboratory is very interested in understanding the mechanism underlying inflammation of the human prostate and it's impact on prostate diseases. The laboratory utilizes comparative animal models that closely track human prostate disease to examine prostate disease mechanisms and also as tools for translational research. Some specific areas of research interest are as follows -

1. Th1/Th17 mechanisms in chronic pelvic pain: We are interested in understanding the mechanism of T cell mediated pain, the effectors of the pain pathway and measures to modulate Th1/Th17 immune response in animal models and ultimately in humans.

2. Chemokine mechanisms in chronic pelvic pain:We are in the process of identifying the mechanisms that appear to mediate chemokine mediated pelvic pain by focusing both on the prostate as well as on neuronal mechanisms of central sensitization. A further focus of this project is the role of mast cells and mast cell-released intermediates in the pathogenesis of chronic pelvic pain. Identification of biomarkers for CP/CPPS in humans is also an emphasis of this project.

3. Pattern recognition receptors in prostate inflammation: Deficiencies in TLR4 signaling pathways result in increased susceptibility to bacterial infection, and profound defects in innate and adaptive immunity. We are in the process of studying the microbial pathogenesis of prostatic bacterial isolates and dissecting TLR signaling pathways in prostate cells.[Shorten text]

Keywords

Select a keyword to see all related Feinberg faculty via the main faculty profile site.


Education and Certification

  • PhD: University of Minnesota, Comparative and Molecular Biosciences (2004)

Contact

312-503-1050
Laboratory: 312-908-2001

Tarry Building Room 16-755
300 E Superior
Chicago IL 60611