The Investiture of Dr. Marianne Green as the Curry Professor

(from left to right) Dr. Barbara Olin Taylor, Dr. Raymond Curry, and Dr. Marianne Green

On August 29, Marianne M. Green, MD, was formally invested as the Raymond H. Curry, MD, Professor of Medical Education. As a faculty physician who provides care at Northwestern Medicine, Dr. Green also serves in the leadership roles of senior associate dean for Medical Education and associate professor of Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine at Feinberg.

“Carrying great prestige within a university, endowed professorships embody the highest honor an institution can bestow on its prominent faculty. They also serve as ongoing, living memorials—tributes to the generosity of those that support them and testimonials to their wisdom in investing in the future of our school,” said Diane B. Wayne, MD, vice dean for Education and chair of the Department of Medical Education, who served as the emcee at the celebration. Dr. Wayne also is the Dr. John Sherman Appleman Professor of Medical Education, as well as professor of Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.

(from left to right) Dr. Patricia Garcia, professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Medical Education; Dr. Marianne Green; Dr. Diane Wayne; and Dr. Sandra Sanguino, associate dean for Student Affairs.

The Raymond H. Curry, MD, Professorship in Medical Education was established in honor of Dr. Curry and his contributions to Feinberg. Dr. Curry served as vice dean for Education at Feinberg and president of the McGaw Medical Center at Northwestern from 1998 to 2014. During his leadership, he helped to establish programs that enhanced medical student grants and scholarships, restructured financial aid procedures and reduced student debt, promoted diversity, and renewed the MD curriculum. The Curry Professorship endowment is intended to recognize Dr. Curry’s involvement in the development of the Augusta Webster, MD, Office of Medical Education and the creation of the Center for Education in Medicine.

In addition, the Curry Professorship endowment is intended to recognize the influence of Augusta Webster, ’34 MD, who was the first woman in the United States to chair a Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. In 1991, Dr. Curry was named the first Augusta Webster Faculty Fellow in Medical Education at Northwestern.

“This professorship is Dr. Webster’s vision come to life, and we are so thrilled that it will recognize Marianne’s many accomplishments,” continued Dr. Wayne. “We are fortunate to have as wonderful a leader as Marianne.”

The Curry Professorship is significant due to its establishment within the field of medical education. Not many endowed positions exist in this area, yet they are important due to the profound impact they have on the study and practice of medicine through generations of medical students and trainees.

An Inspired Career in Medical Education

David L. Coleman, MD, who is the John Wade Professor and Chair of the Department of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, served as Dr. Green’s extoller.

“Celebrating medical education is so important—it is an enduring gift that is hugely important to the future of medicine,” said Dr. Coleman. “Feinberg has made a powerful statement about its values with this professorship, and you have chosen well in Marianne.”

Dr. Coleman, who also serves as physician-in-chief at Boston Medical Center, continued: “Marianne changes organizations, and she changes them for the better. She leads from where she stands, through preparation, thoughtfulness, principles, and passion. She revels in the progress and achievement of all learners.”

Throughout her academic career, Dr. Green has focused on medical education. She began this work in graduate medical education as associate program director for the internal medicine residency program at Northwestern, and then transitioned to medical student education as director of both the primary care clerkship and Northwestern’s Honors Program in Medical Education. She was then appointed associate dean for Medical Education and Competency Achievement, which led to her current position as senior associate dean.

“What we do in medical education is ultimately about patient care and the health of our communities. If we can impact our students, we can improve healthcare,” said Dr. Green. “Each year, it is our job to make 165 medical students think, act, and feel like physicians. We have tremendous power to influence these students. They literally will touch thousands of patients in the future through their work as physicians.”

“Thank you for this professorship—an innovative, enlightened way to promote and enrich medical education,” said Dr. Green. 

(from left to right) Dr. Marianne Green; Ms. Katherine Kurtz, former vice dean for Development at Feinberg; Dr. Eric G. Neilson, Lewis Landsberg Dean and vice president of Medical Affairs at Feinberg; Dr. Rudolf Werner, Dr. Green's father, who is professor emeritus in the Department of Biochemistry at University of Miami School of Medicine; and Mr. Raburn Howland, Ms. Kurtz's partner.

“What we do in medical education is ultimately about patient care and the health of our communities. If we can impact our students, we can improve healthcare. Each year, it is our job to make 165 medical students think, act, and feel like physicians. We have tremendous power to influence these students. ”

- Dr. Marianne Green