Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Faculty Profiles
Kyle P Eagen, PhD

Kyle P Eagen, PhD

Feinberg Fellow

Instructor of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics

Focus of Work

Bio

Kyle Eagen was an undergraduate at Cornell University where he received his bachelor's degree in Biological Sciences with a concentration in Biochemistry while studying the rapid chemical kinetics of neurotransmitter receptors in the lab of George Hess. He moved to California in 2008 for graduate studies at Stanford University. At Stanford, he worked with Roger Kornberg studying chromatin and chromosome structure. After completing his Ph.D. in Biophysics, Dr. Eagen began his independent career ...[Read full text]Kyle Eagen was an undergraduate at Cornell University where he received his bachelor's degree in Biological Sciences with a concentration in Biochemistry while studying the rapid chemical kinetics of neurotransmitter receptors in the lab of George Hess. He moved to California in 2008 for graduate studies at Stanford University. At Stanford, he worked with Roger Kornberg studying chromatin and chromosome structure. After completing his Ph.D. in Biophysics, Dr. Eagen began his independent career in 2017 as the inaugural Feinberg Fellow at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine within the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics.[Shorten text]

Academic Focus

The molecular basis of DNA folding within interphase nuclei and mitotic chromosomes is one of the great mysteries of biology and has fascinated scientists for over a century. An increasing number of human diseases, from congenital malformations to cancer, have been linked to DNA misfolding, hastening the need to resolve this mystery. We combine concepts and approaches from structural biology and biochemistry with methods and analytical tools from molecular biology and genomics to determine the...[Read full text]The molecular basis of DNA folding within interphase nuclei and mitotic chromosomes is one of the great mysteries of biology and has fascinated scientists for over a century. An increasing number of human diseases, from congenital malformations to cancer, have been linked to DNA misfolding, hastening the need to resolve this mystery. We combine concepts and approaches from structural biology and biochemistry with methods and analytical tools from molecular biology and genomics to determine the structural and biochemical basis of chromatin folding and chromosome condensation. Our long-term goal is to contribute fundamental knowledge about the nature of DNA folding and elucidate general principles of chromatin and chromosome organization that will enable insights into human disease processes and serve as a basis for developing targeted, precise therapeutics.[Shorten text]

Keywords


Education and Certification

  • PhD: Stanford University, Biophysics (2017)

Contact

312-503-5012

Searle Building Room 6-525
320 E Superior
Chicago IL 60611

Links

Institutes and Centers